Asian Studies

Ying Wang, Chair

Denise Falk, Academic Department Coordinator


112 Ciruti Center
413-538-2885
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/asian

Overview and Contact Information

The Asian studies (transregional) minor allows students to study the diversity of Asia in a comparative framework. Complementing course work at Mount Holyoke are extracurricular activities and study abroad programs that broaden and deepen students’ understanding of Asia.

On campus, our students experience regional culture at many levels, including language tables and clubs, guest lectures, performing and visual arts, film, festivals, and regional cuisine. These activities are often initiated by and benefit greatly from the diverse student population of Mount Holyoke and particularly the large numbers of students from Asian countries or with an Asian background.

Most of our students spend a semester or a summer in study abroad programs. Mount Holyoke College has affiliated programs or exchanges in China at Shanghai University of Finance and Economics, in Beijing in cooperation with the China Studies Institute of Peking University (summer), and University of Hong Kong, China; in Japan at the Associated Kyoto Program (year) and the Japan Women’s University; and in South Korea at the Ewha Womans University and the Sookmyung Women’s University. Students may also participate in one of the many Mount Holyoke College-approved Middle Eastern or South Asian Study abroad programs.

Asian studies minors graduate to pursue careers in fields as varied as education, business, NGOs, journalism, the arts, government service, and graduate study.

See Also

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Asian Studies Committee:

Satyananda Gabriel, Professor of Economics

Rie Hachiyanagi, Professor of Art

Sohail Hashmi, Professor of International Relations on the Alumnae Foundation and Professor of Politics

Kavita Khory, Ruth Lawson Professor of Politics

Susanne Mrozik, Professor of Religion

Naoko Nemoto, Professor of Asian Studies

Joshua Roth, Professor of Anthropology, Teaching Spring Only

Ajay Sinha, Professor of Art History

Ying Wang, Felicia Gressitt Bock Professor of Asian Studies

Elif Babul, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Teaching Spring Only

Calvin Chen, Associate Professor of Politics, Teaching Fall Only

Amina Steinfels, Associate Professor of Religion

Lan Wu, Assistant Professor of History, On Leave 2019-2020

Lisha Xu, Senior Lecturer in Asian Studies

Heba Arafah, Five College Lecturer in Arabic, On Leave 2019-2020

Jinhwa Chang, Lecturer in Japanese

Kyae-Sung Park, Five College Lecturer in Korean

Richard Chu, Five College Associate Professor of History

Mohamed Hassan, Five College Senior Lecturer in Arabic

May George, Five College Lecturer in Middle East Studies

Nahla Khalil, Five College Lecturer in Arabic

Suk Massey, Five College Lecturer in Korean

Chan Young Park, Five College Lecturer in Korean

John Weinert, Five College Lecturer in Arabic

Xiao Zeng, Visiting Instructor in Chinese

Alice Kao, Visiting Lecturer in Asian Studies 

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 16 credits

12 credits of approved Asian studies courses (including all courses that count toward the Asian studies major or minor) at the 200 level or higher, only 8 of which can be in language12
At least 4 credits in approved Asian studies courses at the 300 level.4
Total Credits16

Additional Specifications

  • Courses should be selected from at least two disciplines.
  • No more than one Asian American studies course may be counted toward the Asian studies minor.
  • There is no language requirement for the Asian Studies minor.
  • See also: minors in Arabic, Chinese, and Japanese.

ASIAN Course Offerings

Asian Culture

ASIAN-211 Topics in Asian Studies

ASIAN-211WH Topics in Asian Studies: 'Water and Historical Settlements in India'

Spring. Credits: 4

The objective of the course is to familiarize students with the complex intertwining of political, religious, social and ecological factors that framed the evolution of historic regions in South Asia. By exploring the cultural landscape of Ellora-Khuldabad-Daulatabad in Maharashtra, India, they will be exposed to diverse methodological approaches such as Historical Anthropology, Comparative Religion and Human Geography, and will be encouraged to raise questions regarding the inter- disciplinary perspective through which such sites may be approached. The course will explore the interplay between historic practice and contemporary development paradigms, raising questions about current water scarcity that could impact many similar sites.

Crosslisted as: GEOG-241WH, HIST-239WH, RELIG-225WH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Mubayi

ASIAN-214 Philosophical Foundations of Chinese Thought: the Ancient Period

Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to Chinese thought during the Eastern Zhou Dynasty (roughly 770-256 BCE), a time of remarkable philosophical growth and controversy. We read the works of this era's most influential philosophers, including: Kongzi (Confucius), Mozi, Laozi, Mengzi (Mencius), Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi. Topics discussed include: What makes for a just ruler? What kind of life should we live? What is our relationship to nature? We work to understand each philosopher's responses to these questions, but we also learn to develop our own answers. We take care to place these figures and their works in their historical and cultural context.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-212
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Harold

ASIAN-215 Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204CW, THEAT-234CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English

ASIAN-247 Chinese Women Writers in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Spring. Credits: 4

In the last hundred years, China witnessed the emergence of many talented Chinese women writers. Not only did they take part in every stage of important socio-political changes in modern and contemporary China, they were and still are the avant-garde of literary reform and innovation. Many of their works, in particular, take gender and gender ideology/politics at issue, while deviating from the traditional discourse that marginalized or trivialized women, exploring creative and effective ways of literary dialogue and imagination. This course will cover women writers from both modern (1911-1949) and contemporary (1949-present) times. Some of the representative women writers include: Ding Ling, Xiao Hong, Zhang Ailing, Zong Pu, Yang Jiang, Wang Anyi, Tie Ning, etc.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English. This class may be especially suitable for students who do not identify as native speakers of English.

ASIAN-248 Contemporary Chinese Fiction: From 1949 to the Present

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A study of representative Chinese fictional writings from 1949 to the present focusing on the ways in which issues of individual and national identity, modernity, and gender have been probed and represented by different generations of Chinese writers. A particular emphasis will be placed on the novels and short stories published since the 1980s, in which both traditional ideology and literary styles are seriously questioned and challenged. Readings include works by Nobel Prize winners Gao Xingjian, Mo Yan and other famous writers, such as Zhang Xianliang, Zhang Jie, Wang Anyi, Yu Hua, Su Tong, Han Shaogong,etc.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English. All readings are also English translations of Chinese fictional works.

ASIAN-339 The Medieval Mirror: Freedom, Gender and Resistance in Contemporary Arabic Literature

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Setting their historical novels in the Middle Ages, contemporary Arab writers such as Radwa Ashour, Jurjy Zaydan, Gamal al-Ghitani and Bensalem Himmich have reflected into the past the problems of present Middle-Eastern societies. Writing from Egypt, Lebanon and Morocco, they revisited with nostalgia the extraordinary medieval heritage of the Arab-Islamic world, educating their readers while taking them on journeys to Medieval Andalusia, to the last years of the Baghdad of the caliphs, and to Cairo on eve of the Ottoman conquest. By looking into the medieval mirror, these authors challenged conservative readings of this heritage. In doing so, they contributed to the modernization of their countries and were able to escape censorship, uphold feminist values, and to criticize Western imperialism and oppressive Arab rulers. In this course, we will read their works in valuable English translations, while discussing their extraordinary lives as twentieth-century writers, intellectuals, and activists.

Crosslisted as: CST-349MR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Lovato
Notes: Taught in English. A special Arabic track will be available for upper-intermediate, advanced, and native students of Arabic.

ASIAN-340 Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone

Spring. Credits: 4

A seminar on the eighteenth-century Chinese masterpiece The Story of the Stone and selected literary criticism in response to this work. Discussions will focus on love, gender-crossing, and women's supremacy and the paradoxical treatments of these themes in the novel. We will explore multiple aspects of these themes, including the sociological, philosophical, and literary milieus of eighteenth-century China. We will also examine this novel in its relation to Chinese literary tradition in general and the generic conventions of pre-modern Chinese vernacular fiction in particular.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333HH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
Y. Wang
Advisory: Intended for East Asian Studies majors and Asian Studies minors.
Notes: Taught in English.

Asian Languages

ASIAN-110 First Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 6

This is an intensive course with emphasizing the rapid development of listening and speaking ability and intended for students with no prior knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. Points of focus include pronunciation and tones, basic syntax, high-frequency vocabulary words, conversational flow, and an introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters. Relevant cultural knowledge and activities will be incorporated into the curriculum. The class will initially be conducted in both English and Chinese, with the proportion of Chinese steadily increasing over the first two months, after which the great majority of instruction will be in Chinese. Supplements class work with lab.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
L. Xu
Coreq: ASIAN-110L.
Advisory: Students with previous or equivalent language study should contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-111 First Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 110, First Year Chinese I, with an introduction to Mandarin Chinese and the development of oral proficiency as well as gradual acquisition of reading and writing skills. Supplements class work with lab.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-110 or equivalent. Coreq: ASIAN-111L.
Advisory: Students with previous or equivalent language study should contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-120 First Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 6

Introduces listening, speaking, reading, and writing modern Japanese; hiragana, katakana, and approximately 150 Kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Coreq: ASIAN-120L.
Advisory: Only first-year and sophomore students may pre-register; if space is available, juniors and seniors may be able to register during Add/Drop; students with previous training in Japanese should contact Naoko Nemoto for placement.

ASIAN-121 First Year Japanese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This continues Asian Studies 120, First Year Japanese I. Introduces listening, speaking, reading, and writing modern Japanese; hiragana, katakana, and approximately 150 Kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-120. Coreq: ASIAN-121L.
Advisory: Students with previous training in Japanese should contact Naoko Nemoto, nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-130 First Year Arabic I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic and one dialect. It begins with a study of the Arabic script and sounds using the Alif Baa textbook, and then students will use Al-Kitaab I, 3rd edition (chapters 1-5). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions in Arabic. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises, students will write short paragraphs, and participate in role plays and conversations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
B. Oulbeid
Advisory: Students with previous language study should contact Mohamed El-Sawi Hassan (Amherst College) for placement.

ASIAN-131 First Year Arabic II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of ASIAN-130, First Year Arabic I. It covers chapters 6-13 of Al-Kitaab I, 3rd edition, with a focus on improving students' speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn to read and analyze a range of authentic texts to engage with Arab cultures. In addition, they will write short essays, and participate in role plays, debates, and conversations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
B. Oulbeid
Prereq: ASIAN-130 or equivalent.

ASIAN-160 First Year Korean I

Fall. Credits: 4

First Year Korean I is the first half of an introductory two-semester course. It is designed to provide students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Advisory: Students with previous training in Korean should contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement. Juniors and seniors are not allowed to pre-register. If space is available, they may be able to register during add/drop.

ASIAN-161 First Year Korean II

Spring. Credits: 4

First Year Korean II is the second half of a two-semester introductory course. It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in First Year Korean I and to continue developing students' proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how ethese can be used in context. Students will also develop their ability to communicate about topics related to everyday events and situations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Prereq: ASIAN-160 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-212 Second Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 6

This is an intensive course to consolidate and expand students' competencies in the four fundamental areas of language learning--speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will improve their oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge their vocabulary. Emphasis on facilitating daily-life interactions will be supplemented and expanded by increasing discussion of broader issues in society. Students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of relevant aspects of Chinese culture. This course is conducted mostly in Chinese. Supplements class work with lab.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-111 or equivalent. Coreq: ASIAN-212L.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-213 Second Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 212, Second Year Chinese I. There is equal emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Chinese. Class work is supplemented with audio and video and extensive reading materials.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
L. Xu, X. Zeng
Prereq: ASIAN-212 or equivalent. Coreq: ASIAN-213L.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-222 Second Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 6

This course emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Japanese. Includes approximately 250 kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang
Prereq: ASIAN-121. Coreq: ASIAN-222L.
Advisory: Asian Studies 121 or equivalent (consult Naoko Nemoto for placement)

ASIAN-223 Second Year Japanese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 222, Second Year Japanese I. Emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Japanese. Includes approximately 250 kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang
Prereq: ASIAN-222 or equivalent. Coreq: ASIAN-223L.
Advisory: Contact Naoko Nemoto, nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-229 Analyzing Japanese: Intro to Linguistics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces basic linguistics methodologies to analyze the Japanese language. These methodologies include phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. We will introduce them by comparing Japanese to English and other languages.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-120.

ASIAN-232 Second Year Arabic I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is the continuation of ASIAN-131, First Year Arabic II. Students will further their knowledge of Arabic, focusing on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio, and websites. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. Students will use Al Kitaab, Book 2 (3rd edition), completing Chapter 4 by the end of the semester.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Prereq: ASIAN-131.
Advisory: Asian Studies 131 or equivalent (contact Mohamed El-Sawi Hassan at Amherst College for placement)

ASIAN-233 Second Year Arabic II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is the continuation of ASIAN-232, Second Year Arabic I. Students will further their knowledge of Arabic, focusing on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio, and websites. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. Students will continue using Georgetown Textbook Al Kitaab, Book 2, 3rd edition.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Prereq: ASIAN-232 or equivalent.

ASIAN-262 Second Year Korean I

Fall. Credits: 4

Second Year Korean I is the first half of a two-semester intermediate Korean course. It is designed to provide students with intermediate proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will strengthen students' communicative skills on familiar topics related to everyday events and situations. Students will also develop discourse/pragmatic competence in various social contexts of communication.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-161 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-263 Second Year Korean II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is the second half of intermediate Korean, which consists of two semesters altogether. It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in ASIAN-262, Second Year Korean I, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Prereq: ASIAN-262 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-310 Third Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course helps students to build linguistic and communicative competence in Mandarin Chinese through reading, discussing, and writing about authentic texts. Newspapers, essays, and short stories will be the teaching materials for the course. An interactive approach will be incorporated into the curriculum to improve students' conversational skills. The class will be conducted mostly in Chinese, and class hours will be supplemented by individual work in the Language Resource Center.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao
Prereq: ASIAN-213 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-311 Third Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course continues Asian Studies 310, Third Year Chinese I, in helping students build linguistic and communicative competence in Mandarin Chinese through reading, discussing, and writing about authentic texts. Newspapers, essays, and short stories will be the teaching materials for the course. An interactive approach will be incorporated into the curriculum to improve students' conversational skills. The class will be conducted mostly in Chinese, and class hours will be supplemented by individual work in the Language Resource Center.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao
Prereq: ASIAN-310 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-312 Newspaper Reading and Journalistic Practice in China

Fall. Credits: 4

This course advances students' Chinese reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills by studying journalistic reports on the most pressing issues in China and the U.S. It also introduces the formal expressions, writing styles, and terminology commonly used in Chinese media. In addition, the course intends to help familiarize students with various media channels and agencies, understand the challenges of journalistic practice in the internet age, and enhance students' critical thinking and analytical stills by broadening their perspective and comparing Chinese and English media sources. Conducted mainly in Chinese with the addition of relevant English materials.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
X. Zeng
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-313 Advanced Chinese Reading

ASIAN-313SH Advanced Chinese Reading: 'Reading Chinese Classics: 17th Century Short Stories'

Spring. Credits: 2

In 17th-century China, an effort arose that challenged Neo-Confucian moral values and legitimized human desire. This trend is best reflected in the fictional writings of Feng Menglong, Ling Mengchu, and Li Yu. Daring and earthy, their stories deal with many aspects of mundane life in urbanized communities, portraying social customs with local colors. Under these writers' pen, individual struggles for survival, love, and sexual desire coexist with social vicissitudes caused by war, famine, and politics. This course intends to help students better understand the urban life and human relations of 17th-century China and gain knowledge about the huaben genre and its influence on later pre-modern fictional writings. Course works include readings and writings in Chinese, and translation from Chinese to English.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-312, ASIAN-314, or ASIAN-315. Native Chinese speakers who have taken a 100- or 200-level course on China, contact instructor for permission.
Notes: Taught in Chinese

ASIAN-314 Learning Chinese Through Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will improve students' four communication skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) by studying contemporary Chinese films, including several prize winners/nominees by internationally acclaimed directors such as Zhang Yimou, Li An, and Chen Kaige. The class will watch the films and then use the synopses and selected dialogues from the scripts as reading materials to facilitate both linguistic and cultural learning. Social and cultural issues reflected in the films will be discussed. The class will be conducted mainly in Chinese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-315 Business Culture and Communication in China

Spring. Credits: 4

An advanced speaking- and writing-intensive Chinese course focusing on Chinese business communication and culture. Will further improve students' Chinese proficiency and oral communication by using Chinese as a tool to investigate topics in business and business culture in China. As well as the textbook, the course will make use of a variety of supplementary materials, including some in English. Through lectures and other activities, students will gain experience and comfort in reading and discussing business news, producing analytic and technical forms of business writing, translating business-related documents, and other skills for future work in China.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
X. Zeng
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.
Notes: Taught entirely in Chinese.

ASIAN-316 Introduction to Translation Between  Chinese and English

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This is an introductory course on Chinese-English translation. The course develops the student's ability to think deeply about the texts and to produce natural and accurate translation from Chinese to English and vice versa. Both oral and written translation skills are emphasized; students will conduct translations at different linguistic levels, from expressions to sentences to discourses. The class materials include Metaphors and idioms, economic text, news and reportage, business, governmental, legal documents, film subtitles, fiction, song, and poetry.Students will be assigned a real translation project at the end of the course. Technology will be used to assist learning and publishing of translated texts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-317 Media and Translation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course intends to further advance students' language skills in Chinese through both traditional mass media and the emerging social media. In addition to the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), oral interpretation and written translation (from Chinese to English and vice versa) will be emphasized in class as a way of deeper comprehension and useful skill of communication. While the reading and viewing materials used in this class are written news reports and news videos, the means of mock publication include some interactive social media tools such as blogs and podcasts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-324 Third Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course helps students attain a higher level of proficiency in modern Japanese through the extended use of the language in practical contexts. The class will be conducted mostly in Japanese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-223.
Advisory: Asian Studies 223 or equivalent (contact Naoko Nemoto for placement)

ASIAN-326 Third Year Japanese II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course continues Asian Studies 324, Third Year Japanese I. Emphasizes attaining a higher level of proficiency in modern Japanese through the extended use of the language in practical contexts. The class will be conducted mostly in Japanese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-324.

Independent Study

ASIAN-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ASIAN-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Related Courses Approved for the Asian Studies Minor

Most Asian studies courses offered by other departments at Mount Holyoke are listed below, but students should also consult the catalog entries or websites of other departments, including Art History, History, International Relations, Politics, and Religion. Asian Studies minors may also plan to use the rich resources of the Five College Consortium in selecting their courses (Iistings are available through the Five College Class Schedule or individual college websites). 

Please consult the chair of the Asian Studies Committee for guidelines regarding Asian languages not taught in the Five Colleges.

Anthropology
ANTHR-204Anthropology of Modern Japan4
ANTHR-316MESpecial Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of the Political in the Contemporary Middle East'4
Art History
ARTH-105Arts of Asia4
ARTH-261Arts of China4
ARTH-263Arts of India4
ARTH-271Arts of Islam: Book, Mosque, and Palace4
ARTH-290BCIssues in Art History: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'4
Art Studio
ARTST-269Japanese Papermaking and Aesthetics4
Asian Studies
ASIAN-110First Year Chinese I6
ASIAN-111First Year Chinese II6
ASIAN-120First Year Japanese I6
ASIAN-121First Year Japanese II6
ASIAN-130First Year Arabic I4
ASIAN-131First Year Arabic II4
ASIAN-160First Year Korean I4
ASIAN-161First Year Korean II4
ASIAN-211WHTopics in Asian Studies: 'Water and Historical Settlements in India'4
ASIAN-212Second Year Chinese I6
ASIAN-213Second Year Chinese II6
ASIAN-214Philosophical Foundations of Chinese Thought: the Ancient Period4
ASIAN-215Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater4
ASIAN-222Second Year Japanese I6
ASIAN-223Second Year Japanese II6
ASIAN-229Analyzing Japanese: Intro to Linguistics4
ASIAN-232Second Year Arabic I4
ASIAN-233Second Year Arabic II4
ASIAN-247Chinese Women Writers in the 20th and 21st Centuries4
ASIAN-248Contemporary Chinese Fiction: From 1949 to the Present4
ASIAN-262Second Year Korean I4
ASIAN-263Second Year Korean II4
ASIAN-310Third Year Chinese I4
ASIAN-311Third Year Chinese II4
ASIAN-312Newspaper Reading and Journalistic Practice in China4
ASIAN-313SHAdvanced Chinese Reading: 'Reading Chinese Classics: 17th Century Short Stories'2
ASIAN-314Learning Chinese Through Film4
ASIAN-315Business Culture and Communication in China4
ASIAN-316Introduction to Translation Between  Chinese and English4
ASIAN-317Media and Translation4
ASIAN-324Third Year Japanese I4
ASIAN-326Third Year Japanese II4
ASIAN-339The Medieval Mirror: Freedom, Gender and Resistance in Contemporary Arabic Literature4
ASIAN-340Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone4
Critical Social Thought
CST-249BETopics in Critical Social Thought: 'Buddhist Ethics'4
CST-349BGAdvanced Topics: ''Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu'4
CST-349MRAdvanced Topics: 'The Medieval Mirror: Freedom, Gender and Resistance in Contemporary Arabic Literature'4
Dance
DANCE-143Classical Indian Dance2
English
ENGL-274Introduction to Asian American Literature4
ENGL-334BGAsian American Film and Visual Culture: 'Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu Masters'4
Film Studies
FLMST-270BCNational/Transnational Cinema: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'4
Geography
GEOG-241WHTopics in Geography: 'Water and Historical Settlements in India'4
Gender Studies
GNDST-204CWWomen and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'4
GNDST-206CGWomen and Gender in History: 'Women and Gender in China'4
GNDST-206MCWomen and Gender in History: 'Women and Gender in Modern China'4
GNDST-210SLWomen and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Gender in Islam'4
GNDST-333HHAdvanced Seminar: 'Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone'4
GNDST-333SAAdvanced Seminar: 'Women and Gender in Modern South Asia'4
History
HIST-124History of Modern South Asia, 1700 to the Present4
HIST-137Modern East Asia, 1600-20004
HIST-182MNTopics in History: 'Mao to Now: History of the People's Republic of China'4
HIST-223Religion and Politics in Modern India4
HIST-224The Busy Silk Roads: Cultural Exchange in Pre-modern Eurasia4
HIST-239ENTopics in Asian History: 'Empire, Nation, and the Making of Tribes in South Asia'4
HIST-239MCTopics in Asian History: 'Borderlands and Ethnicity in Modern China'4
HIST-239METopics in Asian History: 'Cities in Modern East Asia'4
HIST-239MRTopics in Asian History: 'The Maritime Silk Roads: China and the World'4
HIST-239WHTopics in Asian History: 'Water and Historical Settlements in India'4
HIST-296CGWomen in History: 'Women and Gender in China'4
HIST-296MCWomen in History: 'Women and Gender in Modern China'4
HIST-301CSColloquium: 'Capitalism in South Asia'4
HIST-301NDColloquium: 'The Indian Ocean World'4
HIST-301SAColloquium: 'Women and Gender in Modern South Asia'4
HIST-331FCTopics in Asian History: 'A Taste of China: History of Food Culture and the Environment'4
HIST-332Environmental History of China4
Jewish Studies
JWST-216Middle East Politics4
Philosophy
PHIL-212Philosophical Foundations of Chinese Thought: The Ancient Period4
Politics
POLIT-208Chinese Politics4
POLIT-216Middle East Politics4
POLIT-224The United States and Iran4
POLIT-226The United States, Israel, and the Arabs4
POLIT-228East Asian Politics4
POLIT-333Just War and Jihad: Comparative Ethics of War and Peace4
POLIT-341Political Islam4
POLIT-342Islamic Political Thought4
POLIT-357War and Peace in South Asia4
POLIT-359Democratization and Civil Society in East Asia4
POLIT-373The Politics of Transformation in China and India4
Religion
RELIG-102Introduction to Islam4
RELIG-163Introduction to Buddhism4
RELIG-201Reading the Qur'an4
RELIG-207Women and Gender in Islam4
RELIG-223Religion and Politics in Modern India4
RELIG-225ANTopics in Religion: 'Arts of India'4
RELIG-225WHTopics in Religion: 'Water and Historical Settlements in India'4
RELIG-241Women and Gender in Buddhism4
RELIG-267Buddhist Ethics4
RELIG-311Sufism: The Mystic Path in Islam4
RELIG-343The Sabbath4
Russian & Eurasian Studies
RES-312Silk Roads: Ancient and Modern Highways Across the Eurasian Continent4
Theatre Arts
THEAT-234CWTopics in Theatre Studies: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'4