Anthropology

Kenneth Tucker, Chair

Michelle Pietras, Academic Department Coordinator


102 Porter Hall
413-538-2283
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/anthropology

Overview and Contact Information

Anthropology at Mount Holyoke College is devoted to the study of human cultural diversity through time and around the world. The approach is cross-cultural, the perspective non-ethnocentric. The analytic tools will help students make sense of the human condition no matter how familiar or foreign it may seem. Our courses are designed to expose students to a variety of cultures and introduce them to the different topics, theories, and methods of the discipline of anthropology.

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Anthropology faculty:

Lynn Morgan, Mary E. Woolley Professor of Anthropology, Teaching Spring Only

Joshua Roth, Professor of Anthropology

Elif Babül, Associate Professor of Anthropology 

Sabra Thorner, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Teaching Spring Only

Matthew Watson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Felicity Aulino, Five College Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Elizabeth Klarich, Five College Assistant Professor of Anthropology

William Girard, Visiting Lecturer in Anthropology

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 32 credits:

ANTHR-105Introduction to Cultural Anthropology4
ANTHR-235Development of Anthropological Thought4
or SOCI-223 Development of Social Thought
ANTHR-275Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology4
ANTHR-350Issues in Contemporary Anthropological Theory4
One area course in anthropology4
Alternatively, the cultural area requirement can be fulfilled through: approved study abroad, or foreign language through two semesters at the intermediate level, or an area course in another discipline 1
4 additional credits in Anthropology 24
8 additional credits at the 300 level8
Total Credits32

Additional Specifications

  •  ANTHR-295 or ANTHR-395 do not count toward the requirements of courses in the major at the 200 and 300 level.

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 20 credits:

ANTHR-105Introduction to Cultural Anthropology4
4 credits at the 300 level 14
12 additional credits above the 100 level12
Total Credits20

Course Offerings

ANTHR-105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Introduces the analysis of cultural diversity, including concepts, methods, and purposes in interpreting social, economic, political, and belief systems found in human societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Babül, W. Girard, P. Mangan, J. Roth, M. Watson, The department
Restrictions: This course is limited to first years, sophomores and juniors

ANTHR-204 Anthropology of Modern Japan

Spring. Credits: 4

Since the mid-nineteenth century, Americans have viewed Japan as the Orient's most exotic and mysterious recess, alternately enticing and frightening in its difference. Intense economic relations and cultural exchange between Japan and the U.S. have not dispelled the image of Japanese society and culture as fundamentally different from our own. In this course, we will strive for greater understanding of shared experiences as well as historical particularities. Issues covered may vary from one semester to another, but frequently focus on work, women, minorities, and popular culture. Films and anthropological works provide ethnographic examples of some key concepts.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth

ANTHR-212 Shopping and Swapping: Cultures of Consumption and Exchange

Fall. Credits: 4

We shop for our food, for our clothes, for our colleges. We purchase cars, manicures, and vacations. It seems that there is little that cannot be bought or sold. But we also give and receive gifts, exchange favors, 'go dutch' in restaurants, and invite friends for potlucks. This course examines exchange systems cross-culturally, in order to understand their cultural significance and social consequences. It explores how our own commodity exchange system, which appears to be no more than an efficient means of distributing goods and services, in fact contains intriguing symbolic dimensions similar to the gift exchange systems of Native North America, Melanesia, and Africa.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216 Special Topics in Anthropology

ANTHR-216AF Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Archaeology of Food'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the study of ancient foodways with a focus on how and why humans across the globe began to domesticate plant and animal resources approximately 10,000 years ago. The first half of the course presents the types of archaeological data and analytical methods used to study the "agricultural revolution" in a variety of regions. The second half explores a number of themes within the archaeology of food that investigate the relationship between agriculture and sedentism, food and gender, the politics of feasting, and methods for integrating archaeological and ethnographic approaches to the study of food.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
E. Klarich
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216AU Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Peoples and Cultures of Indigenous Australia'

Spring. Credits: 4

Indigenous peoples of Australia have long been objects of interest and imagination by outsiders-for their ceremonial practices, social structures, religious forms, aesthetic expressions, and relationships to land. This course will explore how Aboriginal peoples have struggled to reproduce and represent themselves and their lifeways on their own terms -- via visual media (pigment designs on bark, acrylic paintings on canvas); performances (cultural festivals, plays, other forms); archival interventions (photographic, textual, digital); museum exhibition; and various textual genres (autobiography, fiction, poetry). We will examine "traditional" and "contemporary" productions as all part of culture and culture-making in the present, emphasizing that this is ongoing and intercultural work.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216CA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Collecting the Past: Art and Artifacts of the Ancient Americas'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Early European explorers, modern travelers, collectors, curators, and archaeologists have contributed to the development of ancient Latin American collections in museums across the globe. This course traces the history of these collecting practices and uses recent case studies to demonstrate how museums negotiate--successfully and unsuccessfully--the competing interests of scholars, donors, local communities, and international law. Students will learn how archaeologists study a variety of artifact types within museum collections and will have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects using pre-Columbian pottery collections from the Mount Holyoke Art Museum.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Klarich
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One course in archaeology, anthropology, history of Latin America, museum studies, or art history.

ANTHR-216HP Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Feminist Health Politics'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-241HP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 4 credits in gender studies.

ANTHR-216HR Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology and Human Rights: Between Devil's Advocate and Rights Advocacy'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores anthropological approaches to human rights -- a key theme of transnational politics and international law. Anthropologists have contributed to discussions on human rights since the UN Declaration and the field has provided a vibrant platform to analyze ideologies, politics, and practices surrounding human rights. We will survey an array of anthropological studies that approach human rights from the perspective of cultural relativism, contextualization, advocacy, and practice. Students will gain a critical perspective on the seemingly universal rhetoric of human rights by learning how it produces diverse effects in places such as Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Babül
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216LA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Latin America'

Fall. Credits: 4

Latin America has undergone massive political, economic and cultural transformations since the end of the Cold War. Indeed, during the final decades of the twentieth century, much of the region embraced neoliberal governance and free market capitalism. However, by the turn of the millennium, many Latin American governments had made a sharp "turn to the Left," as states began to intervened more directly in the economy, promote alternative imaginings of modernization, and recognize greater rights for Indigenous and Afro-descendent peoples. This course will begin with a focus on these shifts in governance, but largely focuses on the consequences of these changes within people's everyday lives.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216MG Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Migration Through Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The dramatic increase in transnational migrations has prompted new debates over globalization, diversity, and human rights. In these debates, the fate of migrants is defined by competing visions of them as pawns or pioneers, as passive victims or driven agents. This course explores the key role played by film in such representations, comparing and contrasting film to ethnography as a way to relate migrant experiences and understand migration. We look at how documentaries, feature films in local and world cinema, and ethnographies represent decisions to go abroad and the effects of migration on home and host communities. We ask what can be gleaned from these sources, such as: What it is like to be an undocumented migrant or a member of a "second generation"? What we can learn about the conditions of trafficked women or refugees? How do the politics and policies of bordering work. We also explore how geography, citizenship, class, gender, age, ethnicity, race and religion feature in these representations. Students will critically analyze how migrants are represented in film through active class discussions and several written essays.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Keough

ANTHR-216NF Special Topics in Anthropology: 'The Anthropology of Food'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Drawing on a holistic, multidisciplinary perspective, this course considers food as a lens through which issues such as gender, family, community, nationality, religion and class can be more deeply understood. Food and drink are examined not only for the biological needs they fill but also in terms of their spiritual and cultural dimensions. We will explore the journey of food production, preparation, distribution and consumption nationally and internationally. Local, national and global networks are analyzed as we examine the role food plays in creating and mediating socioeconomic and political relationships. Food scarcity, security, sovereignty and sustainability are also considered.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
P. Mangan
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216PY Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Play'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We associate play with childhood, a time of spontaneous and creative activity, in contrast to the boring routine of adult responsibilities. And yet play is more than just fun and games. It is through play that children develop lasting cognitive and social skills. For adults too, there can be serious play -- play that has real consequence -- play that shapes the intimate lives of individuals, as well as entire social formations. In this course, we will explore play cross-culturally, from the Balinese cockfight to American football, from gambling to roll playing. We will design games based on the anthropological readings in order to appreciate the game-like qualities of many domains of life.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216RK Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Risk'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

People in all societies face uncertainty. Dangers, many of our own making, confront us at every turn - in the form of global warming, market collapses, tainted food, epidemics, and accidents at work and on roads. Terrorist attacks and crime have led to the increased control of urban public spaces. Modern institutions and technologies of risk (probability, insurance, audits, sundry regulation) strive to tame chance, to make it manageable, and even potentially profitable, and have contributed to emergent cultures of risk. In this course, we examine these technologies of risk and associated cultural forms, in relation to other means by which people have dealt with uncertainty in the past.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Roth
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-230 Language in Culture and Society

Fall. Credits: 4

Language is integral to human experiences across cultures. Interpersonal communication holds social worlds together, lending them significance. This course examines language as a complex, embodied field of cultural practice and performance. It bridges core concepts within linguistic anthropology and semiotics -- such as relativity, indexicality, performance, and language ideology -- with critical analyses of social fields including race, gender, and sexuality. Illustrative examples are drawn from Western and non-Western societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-235 Development of Anthropological Thought

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will review the key issues and paradigm shifts in the development of anthropology from its foundations in classical thought through its emergence as an independent discipline to its coming-of-age in the 1960s. The readings will include works from the American, British, and Continental traditions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-240 Medical Anthropology

Spring. Credits: 4

Biocultural aspects of disease and healing are examined through case studies of nonindustrialized societies, including the relationship between malaria and sickle cell anemia in West Africa and ritual cannibalism, AIDS, and a degenerative nervous-system disorder (kuru) in highland New Guinea. This course surveys the cultural construction of suffering and healing, the medicalization of human social problems, and inequities in the distribution of disease and therapy.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
F. Aulino
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-245 Global Health and Humanitarianism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines global health disparities and the unequal distribution of disease, focusing on the health consequences of poverty, structural violence, and globalization. In addition, we critically examine the foundations of global humanitarianism and the complexities, constraints, and prospects for working collaboratively across borders to resolve global health problems. Readings will address how global health is constructed and represented, and why humanitarian endeavors (charitable, philanthropic, NGO, religious, etc.) have emerged as the preferred manner of addressing global health problems in the contemporary era.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-246 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Religion counts among anthropology's most central and enduring areas of interest. This course traces a history of anthropological attention to belief and ritual from the nineteenth century to the present. We will read classic and contemporary ethnographic studies of religious systems, covering topics that include spirits and animism, totemism, magic, witchcraft, mythology, taboo, sacrilege, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, religion and modernity, and secularism. The course will scrutinize "religion" itself as a cultural and analytical category, and it will question how an anthropological perspective alters perceptions of the global politics of religion today.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225MG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-247 Anthropology, Experience, and the Mind

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will explore new frontiers in psychological anthropology to ask questions about the foundations of human experience. What are the boundaries between the universal and the constructed, nature and culture, the ordinary and the extraordinary? In what ways is our thinking along such lines conditioned, as scholars and as social actors more generally? And are there means to break habituated ways of knowing to arrive at fresh insight into our own ways of being and that of others? These questions, among others, will be examined through ethnographic writings, science fiction and literary accounts, film, and cross-disciplinary work from physicists and cognitive scientists. Topics will include local theory of mind, notions of the self, karma and nonlinear time, and varying modes of spiritual experience.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
F. Aulino
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-275 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines anthropological fieldwork techniques, including interviewing and participant observation, as well as qualitative approaches to the analysis of cultural data. Topics include cross-cultural field techniques, research design, ethical dilemmas, and the difference between academic and applied research. Research projects are an integral part of this course.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
E. Babül
Restrictions: This course is limited to Anthropology majors.
Coreq: ANTHR-275L.

ANTHR-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ANTHR-306 Anthropology of Reproduction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course covers major issues in the anthropology of reproduction, including the relationship between production and reproduction, the gendered division of labor, the state and reproductive policy, embodied metaphors of procreation and parenthood, fertility control and abortion, crosscultural reproductive ethics, and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. We examine the social construction of reproduction in a variety of cultural contexts.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333AR
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology or Gender Studies.

ANTHR-316 Special Topics in Anthropology

ANTHR-316EG Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Eggs and Embryos: Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts, documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333EG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

ANTHR-316LA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Race and Religion in Latin America'

Spring. Credits: 4

The course will begin with an investigation of the proto-racial and religious categories through which Europeans in the early modern era understood human difference. From there, we will trace how these notions were re-conceptualized in the centuries following the encounter between Europeans, Africans, and the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas. As we examine this history -- including the emergence of slavery, eugenics, mestizaje, and Liberation Theology -- we will pay particular attention to how interwoven racial and religious hierarchies were both constructed and resisted. The final section of the course will concentrate on the contemporary entanglements of race and religion in the region.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316LW Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Ethnographies of Law'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on the anthropological study of the legal field. The class will begin with a survey of some classical texts that underpin the legal thought in the modern era. We will then see how anthropologists contributed to the study of law by conceptualizing it as part of larger socio-political processes and as a field that includes social relations, processes, and practices. The students will learn how some key legal issues such as dispute management, decision making, and reconciliation are actualized in diverse cultural and social settings, to think critically and evaluate legal processes in a multicultural setting and in plural societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. Babül
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316ME Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of the Political in the Contemporary Middle East'

Spring. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on anthropological studies of how power - both in its open and hidden forms - manifests itself and shapes everyday life in the contemporary Middle East. It explores how authority is established and contested in various domains including bureaucracy and the state; sexuality and the family; religion and civil society; markets and the media. We will trace how experiences of colonization, imperialism, modernization, nationalism, capitalism, occupation, war and revolt mold the conditions of living for peoples of the Middle East. We will also examine how specific forms of knowledge production attribute coherence to the region, allowing its imagination as an object of intervention in the name of development and security.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Babül
Prereq: 8 Credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316MU Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology in/of Museums'

Spring. Credits: 4

What is a museum, and how is it relevant to all of our lives? This course considers "the museum" as an object of ethnographic inquiry, examining it as a cultural institution perpetually under negotiation and reconfiguration. We reflect on how museum principles of classification, practices of collection and exhibition, and the uptake of digital technologies are central to what and how we know. We investigate and analyze museums as social actors in anthropological debates on power, representation, materiality, value, authenticity, state-making, Indigenous sovereignty, and the preservation and activation of contemporary cultures. The museum is never simply a repository of artifacts, artworks, histories, or scientific inventions, but also a site of tremendous creativity and a field of complex social relations.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316RK Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Risk'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We live in an age of uncertainty. Dangers, many of our own making, confront us at every turn - in the form of global warming, market collapses, tainted food, epidemics, and accidents at work and on roads. Terrorist attacks and crime have led to the increased control of urban public spaces. Modern institutions and technologies of risk (probability, insurance, audits, sundry regulation) strive to tame chance, to make it manageable, and even potentially profitable, and have contributed to emergent cultures of risk. In this course, we examine these technologies of risk and associated cultural forms, in relation to other means by which people have dealt with uncertainty in the past.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Roth
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316RN Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Race / Nation / Gender: Feminist Studies of Scientific, Medical and 'Patient' Mobility'

Spring. Credits: 4

This seminar explores the potentially novel entanglements of 'race', 'nation' and 'gender' through the increasing transnationalization of scientific and medical practices, the mobility of practitioners and consumers, and the mobilization of scientific and medical knowledge by individuals and communities, as well as governmental and civil society organizations. We will engage with the multiple tensions in feminist research on topics such as diversity, population and medical genomics, and reproductive and medical tourism as the multiple and shifting identities of experts and 'lay' individuals call attention to the power and problematics of scientific, medical and patient 'diasporas'.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333RN
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

ANTHR-316SE Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Secularism'

Fall. Credits: 4

What is secularism? For many of us, the answer is obvious: the world without religious belief, or the separation of church and state, or even the "really real" world. In recent years, scholars in number fields have begun to question these common sense notions about secularism. In this course, we will investigate this rapidly expanding literature and the critical lines of inquiry it has opened up: Under what specific cultural and historic conditions did secularism first emerge? Is secularism experienced today in the same way throughout the world? If not, how do they vary? What ways of being and living does secularism encourage or allow to flourish? Which does it stunt, block, or prohibit?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316SP Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Space, Place, and Way-finding'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What makes a home feel like home? What makes a neighborhood feel alive and vibrant? Architects and urban planners develop elaborate designs meant for specific kinds of human uses, and yet we find that people often use spaces for purposes quite different from those that planners intended. In this course, we will explore the ways in which people dwell in the abstract spaces of planners, turning them into inhabited places. We will also explore the ways that people navigate through and between these spaces that have been compartmentalized into politically and socially bounded units. A variety of theoretical perspectives will be applied in diverse cultural cases to better understand the ways in which peoples inhabit the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology department.

ANTHR-316WC Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Writing Capitalism's Ruins'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

There's a low buzz; we feel nervous. Is this capitalism's end? Have zombie silhouettes hit the horizon yet? Keep checking. Anthropology narrates collective feelings, gives form to the ambience. But what's the ambience of late industrialism; what's it feel like to collapse? As we watch factory buildings crumble, we wonder whether the tap water's clean. The question of how to write the world (anthropologically-speaking) must also be a question of how to survive, thrive, and even flourish. Archaeologists have long explored decadence, collapse, and ruins. Cultural anthropologists now find themselves in the archaeologists' shoes. Drawing from archaeology, cultural anthropology, ecology, and literary theory, this course will be an open-ended, writing-oriented examination of contemporary experiences of ruins and ruination. One area of focus is the effects of capitalism and post-industrialism on people of color and non-English speakers in North America.

Crosslisted as: CST-349WC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-342 Science as Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is science? The progressive discovery of Nature's laws? The process of honing claims about the universe? Is science the act of postulating and testing hypotheses? Or is it tinkering, experimentation? This course offers an advanced introduction to cultural and anthropological studies of science. Through careful readings of work in areas such as the sociology of scientific knowledge, actor-network theory, feminist science studies, and affect theory, we will explore the sciences as complex systems of cultural production. The course will culminate in a series of critical ethnographic studies of how the sciences shape concepts and experiences of race, the body, gender, and sexuality.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

ANTHR-350 Issues in Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the major theoretical frameworks developed and debated by anthropologists of the past two decades. It covers core issues in anthropological epistemology, the relationship of ethnography to social and cultural theory, trends in anthropological analysis, and the place of anthropological theory in broader academic and public discourses.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.