Dance

Rose Flachs, Chair

Cathy Smelcer, Academic Department Coordinator


106 Kendall Sports & Dance Complex
413-538-2310
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/dance

Overview and Contact Information

The Five College Dance Department combines the programs of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. The faculty meets to coordinate curricula, course scheduling, performances, and other services. The Five College Dance Department supports a variety of philosophical approaches to dance and provides an opportunity for students to experience a wide spectrum of performance styles and techniques. Course offerings are coordinated among the campuses to facilitate registration, interchange, and student travel; students may take a dance course on any of the five campuses and receive credit at their home institution.

Please consult the Five College Dance Department website for up-to-date listings, faculty, and guest artists. Each semester, a listing of the current Five College dance courses, with specified times and locations, is available online.

Mount Holyoke Faculty

James Coleman, Professor of Dance; Five College Dance Chair

Charles Flachs, Professor of Dance

Rose Flachs, Professor of Dance

Teresa Freedman, Professor of Dance

Constance Hill, Five College Professor of Dance

Paul Matteson, Five College Assistant Professor of Theater and Dance

Shakia Johnson, Visiting Artist in Dance

Matisse Madden, Visiting Artist in Dance

Marilyn Sylla, Five College Visiting Artist in Dance

Sekou Sylla, Visiting Artist in Dance

Daniel Trenner, Visiting Artist in Dance

Debra Vega, Visiting Artist in Dance

Felice Wolfzahn, Visiting Artist in Dance

Candice Salyers, Visiting Lecturer in Dance

Five College Faculty

Professors Blum (Smith), Hill (FCDD), Lowell (Hampshire), Woodson (Amherst); Assistant Professors Aiken (Smith), Dennis (UMass), Goffe (Hampshire), Hauser (Smith), Tome (Smith), Vacanti (UMass); Musicians Arslanian (UMass), Vargas (Smith); Lecturer Maietta (UMass)

How does the body speak? What physical, cultural, and aesthetic principles inform the embodiment and skillful practice of different dance traditions? How is choreography inspired and developed, and what are the key tools of its craft? A dance student will investigate physical, cultural and aesthetic principles of dance and embody the skillful practice of different dance traditions. The curriculum of core courses and areas of concentration emphasize technical training, performance, creative practice and critical/theoretical understanding. A dance major may choose one of three areas of concentration, pursue dance teacher licensure, or choose to create their own concentration supported by the Five College Curriculum. The major is designed to prepare students for dance careers in choreography and performance; science, somatics, and arts therapies; education and community engagement; and history, theory, and criticism.  

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 48 credits:

Core Courses:
DANCE-151Elementary Composition 4
DANCE-171Studies in Dance History 4
DANCE-241Scientific Foundations of Dance 4
DANCE-272Dance and Culture 4
DANCE-287Rhythmic Analysis 4
DANCE-390Senior Capstone Seminar (2 cr fall and 2 cr spring)4
Six 2-credit dance courses (12 cr) of technique in at least two idioms12
Concentration:
Declare one of the following concentrations and complete 12 credits, including a minimum of 8 credits at the 300 level:12
Choreography and Performance
Dance Science, Somatics, and Arts Therapies
History, Theory, and Criticism
Total Credits48

Other Requirements

  • Program plan. The dance major’s program is designed in consultation with her advisor and approval of the department chair.
  • Concentration. Planning for each concentration may include, but is not limited to, the courses listed below. In some cases, courses from other departments may be substituted for the concentrations and will require the approval of the department chair.
  • Crew. Dance majors must serve on crew for a minimum of two dance concerts.

Choreography and Performance

DANCE-252Intermediate Composition 4
DANCE-309Dance Repertory: Ballet Variations 4
DANCE-387Rhythmic Analysis II: Performance 4
Two 2-credit 300-level technique or repertory courses4
Dance-353 Advanced Composition

Dance Science, Somatics, and Arts Therapies

DANCE-377Advanced Studies 4
HACU-247 at Hampshire College: The Sustainable Self: Resources for Body and Mind4
Dance-285 Laban Movement Analysis4
Kinesiology 311 at UMass Amherst: Anatomy of Human Motion4

History, Theory, and Criticism

DANCE-377Advanced Studies 4
Dance 323 at UMass AmherstDance in the New Millennium4
Dance 368 at UMass AmherstWriting about Dance4
HACU 311 at Hampshire CollegeThe Round Table: Research in Dance4

The dance minor is intended to provide a well-rounded and in-depth introduction to dance as an art form.

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 24 credits:

DANCE-151Elementary Composition 4
DANCE-171Studies in Dance History 4
DANCE-241Scientific Foundations of Dance 4
DANCE-272Dance and Culture 4
A minimum of two courses of dance technique or repertory (DANCE-305)4
An additional 4 credits of dance at the 300 level, either in theory or technique4
Total Credits24

Other Requirements 

  • Approval. All minors must be approved by the department chair.
  • Crew. Dance minors must serve on crew for a minimum of two dance concerts.

Teacher Licensure

Students interested in pursuing licensure in the field of dance can combine the core courses in the dance major and required technique courses with a minor in education. Students need to consult with the dance department chair and faculty for the teacher licensure program.

See further information in the catalog about the minor in education and Teacher Licensure, and consult the Teacher Licensure program website.

Course Offerings

The department is renowned for its extensive studio offerings in ballet technique, contemporary/modern technique, and repertory/performance, as well as its rotating offerings in West African dance, hip hop, tap, jazz, Indian classical dance, tango, contact improvisation, and musical theatre. Theory courses range from Scientific Foundations in Dance to Studies in Dance History, Analysis of Rhythm, and Choreography. All courses are designed to contribute in various ways to the College’s Learning Goals. This range of courses is further augmented by more than 100 theory and studio courses offered annually through the Five College Dance Department.

Dance Theory

DANCE-151 Elementary Composition

Fall. Credits: 4

A study of the principles and elements of choreography. How is movement design and meaning constructed? How do the different dimensions of the medium of dance inform and inspire choreographic choices? Course work will focus on experiential and analytical approaches to these questions through readings, video viewings and guided improvisational and compositional explorations of such issues as sensation, time, rhythm, desire, image, shape, space, and effort quality. Students will experiment with a range of tools and strategies for dance making, including movement phrasing, musical structure , collage, group forms, improvisational scoring, and the design of movement in relation to objects and environments.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Salyers

DANCE-171 Studies in Dance History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to present an overview of dance as a performing art in the twentieth century. Through readings, video and film viewings, guest performances, individual research projects, and classroom discussions, students will explore principles and traditions of twentieth-century concert dance traditions, with special attention to their historical and cultural contexts. Special topics may include European and American ballet, the modern dance movement, contemporary and avant-garde experimentation, African American dance forms, jazz dance, and other cultural dance traditions.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-171
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Flachs

DANCE-205 Repertory: First Year Dance

Fall. Credits: 2

A studio course open to first year students by audition. Students are involved in the creation of a new dance to be performed in November as part of the Mount Holyoke Faculty Dance Concert. Through collaborative compositional assignments, students generate inventive movement material that honors diverse training backgrounds, challenges expressive range, and builds partnering skills.

P. Matteson
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Advisory: Audition at the first class and at the fall FCDD faculty audition.

DANCE-241 Scientific Foundations of Dance

Selected scientific aspects of dance, including anatomical identification and terminology, physiological principles, and conditioning/strengthening methodology. These concepts are discussed and explored experientially in relationship to the movement vocabularies of various dance styles.

DANCE-241AK Scientific Foundations of Dance: 'Anatomy and Kinesiology'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers an in-depth experiential study of the human body's skeletal and muscular systems, with additional information on bone growth and development, joint architecture, injuries and their prevention, and the discovery of personal alignment anomalies. Course work will include lecture, laboratory sessions, assigned readings, exams, the creation of a body map and the development of a personalized therapeutic regime.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. Freedman

DANCE-252 Intermediate Composition

Spring. Credits: 4

Intermediate Composition is structured as a workshop for you to explore and expand your own artistic vision. It will increase your understanding of inspiration and intention as they relate to choreography as well as encourage active consideration of choreographic possibilities for space, time, performer/audience interaction, energetic qualities, use of text, music, and physical and environmental intelligences.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-215CP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Salyers
Prereq: DANCE-151 or equivalent choreographic experience.

DANCE-261 Dance Education

DANCE-261DE Dance Education: 'The Power of Dance: Education and Beyond'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed for students of many fields, including dance, education, and psychology to answer questions such as: How do I access learning and teaching through the medium of the body and movement? How do I teach others how to become change agents through dance? How can I create a program of dance that will challenge and invigorate young people in schools, so that all youth can have access and share their own inspiring movement and culture? How do I work with and master existing educational parameters, standards and frameworks and still stay in touch with the reason I dance, and the reasons people dance and want to dance?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Falk
Notes: There will be field trips, teaching opportunities, advocacy experiences, and readings, discussion, studio work, movement and lecture.

DANCE-272 Dance and Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What are the functions that dance serves in society? How does the dancing body signify cultural values? How is dance a vehicle for the articulation of cultural identities? This course attempts to answer these questions from the perspective of dance anthropology and, on occasion, dance history. We will analyze documentaries and texts that illustrate the diverse manners in which dance ethnographers and historians approach the study of dance as a cultural expression. Balancing breadth and depth, the course focuses on a handful of dance forms from North America, Latin America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-272
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Salyers

DANCE-287 Rhythmic Analysis

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The study of music from a dancer's perspective. Topics include musical notation, construction of rhythm, elements of composition (visual aspects of music and movement), communication between dancer and musician, and music listening.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Jones

DANCE-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Students interested in independent study in dance (Dance 295) must provide convincing reasons for pursuing independent work and be self motivated and directed in their work. Students are responsible for choosing and receiving approval from a faculty advisor, with whom workload expectations, meeting times, and outcomes will be mutually negotiated and set for the semester. Credit load (1-4) will reflect the workload level and outcomes of the proposed study (e.g., a 2-credit independent study requires a minimum of 2-4 hours of outside work each week.

The department
Instructor permission required.

DANCE-305 Dance Repertory

Instructor permission required.

DANCE-305CR Dance Repertory: 'Contemporary Repertory'

Spring. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dancers interested in performing. The work developed will be performed in the Five College Faculty Dance Concert at Amherst College, March 2-4, 2017.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Five College Faculty audition

DANCE-305HP Dance Repertory: 'Hip Hop Repertory'

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dancers interested in performing a work by Jennifer Weber. The work developed will be performed in the Fall Faculty Concert.

The department
Advisory: By audition

DANCE-305RB Dance Repertory: 'Ballet Repertory'

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dance students interested in performing. The work developed will be performed on the fall Faculty Concert.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Advisory: By audition

DANCE-305RM Dance Repertory: 'Modern Repertory'

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dancers interested in performing. The work developed will be performed in the Fall Faculty Concert.

J. Coleman, T. Freedman
Advisory: By audition

DANCE-309 Dance Repertory: Ballet Variations

DANCE-309BV Classical Ballet Variations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed for intermediate- to advanced-level dance students who wish to study classical ballet variations. The course examines the evolution of classical ballet choreography and compares and contrasts the many revivals and remakes of classical full-length productions. Students will learn variations from Swan Lake, Giselle, and Cinderella. Requirements outside of the classroom include viewing videotapes, researching choreography, and attending live performances. Pointe shoes are optional.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Flachs

DANCE-377 Advanced Studies

DANCE-377NM Advanced Studies: 'New Millennium Choreography'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course looks at the vast and diverse cultural and aesthetic landscape of dance performance in the millennium and the new breed of choreographers making cutting-edge works that pursue radically different methods, materials and strategies for provoking new ideas about dance, the body and corporeal aesthetics. Taking in the vast spectrum of new-age performance, we will ask such questions as: How does non-narrative dance focus on the body as an instrument with unlimited possibilities? How do heterosexuality, homosexuality and androgyny constitute a gender spectrum in new works? How do you evaluate dances from culturally specific traditions?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Hill

DANCE-387 Rhythmic Analysis II: Performance

Fall. Credits: 4

A continuation of Dance 287. The focus now shifts specifically to performance and the notation of complex rhythmic structures. Working as an ensemble, the class will create a music/dance suite, using body music, movement, vocal work, and music visualization as our inspiration. Emphasis will be placed on odd and mixed meters and rhythmical accuracy. Students will contribute both movement and musical material. Class time will be run like a professional rehearsal. Outside work will focus on musical research, choreography, and music notation. This suite will be performed at Blanchard Campus Center at a date to be determined.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Jones
Prereq: DANCE-287.

DANCE-390 Senior Capstone Seminar

Fall. Credits: 2

Each dance major will be expected to be involved in a senior project during their final year of study. One should sign up for Dance 390, Senior Seminar for both fall and spring semesters. Senior projects can vary, from choreographic or performance work to research topics.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Salyers
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.

DANCE-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

Students interested in independent study in dance (Dance 395) must provide convincing reasons for pursuing independent work and be self motivated and directed in their work. Students are responsible for choosing and receiving approval from a faculty advisor, with whom workload expectations, meeting times, and outcomes will be mutually negotiated and set for the semester. Credit load (1-4) will reflect the workload level and outcomes of the proposed study (e.g., a 2-credit independent study requires a minimum of 2-4 hours of outside work each week.

The department
Instructor permission required.

Performance Studies

DANCE-113 Beginning Modern

Fall. Credits: 2

An introduction to the basic principles of dance movement: body alignment, coordination, strength and flexibility, basic forms of locomotion. No previous dance experience required.

C. Salyers

DANCE-114 Advanced Beginning Modern

Spring. Credits: 2

Advanced beginning modern technique. The course will concentrate on further developing your exposure to and performance of contemporary dance techniques, including strength, flexibility, and anatomical integration while dancing.

C. Salyers

DANCE-119 Contact Improvisation

Fall. Credits: 2

Contact improvisation is a duet movement form that explores communicating through the language of touch, momentum, and weight. Classes will develop simple solo and duet skills - rolling, falling, balance, counterbalance, jumping, weight sharing, and spirals.

F. Wolfzahn

DANCE-120 Beginning Ballet

Fall. Credits: 2

Students will study the basic movements and fundamentals of classical ballet. The movements are taught in a pure form, at a relaxed pace before proceeding to more complex combinations. Ballet I sets the groundwork for the movements and musicality of the ballet lesson.

R. Flachs

DANCE-121 Advanced Beginning Ballet

Spring. Credits: 2

A continuation of the knowledge gained in Ballet I. The course will emphasize maintaining correct body placement, coordination of the arms and head while using the whole body for dance. Curriculum covered will include the small and big classical poses and an increase in the allegro portion of the class.

R. Flachs

DANCE-127 Renaissance and Baroque Dance I

Fall. Credits: 1

Sixteenth- through eighteenth-century European social dance, contemporary with the eras of Elizabeth I and Shakespeare in England, the Medicis in Italy, Louis XIV in France, and colonial America. The focus will be on learning the dances, supplemented by historical and social background, discussion of the original dance sources, and reconstruction techniques.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-147F
N. Monahin, M. Pash
Notes: 1 PE unit.

DANCE-128 Renaissance and Baroque Dance II

Spring. Credits: 1

Continuation of Renaissance and Baroque Dance I. Sixteenth- through eighteenth-century European social dance, contemporary with the eras of Elizabeth I and Shakespeare in England, the Medicis in Italy, Louis XIV in France, and colonial America. The focus will be on learning the dances, supplemented by historical and social background, discussion of the original dance sources, and reconstruction techniques.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-147F
N. Monahin, M. Pash
Prereq: DANCE-127 or MUSIC-147D.

DANCE-132 Introduction to Hip-Hop

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This class will introduce students to the basic elements of various styles of hip-hop dance including breaking, popping, locking, and contemporary music video style. In addition, students will learn the history of hip-hop-Rs four elements: breaking, MCing, DJing, and graffiti. Each class will start with a warm-up focusing on hip-hop fundamentals, and conclude with a short combination fusing these diverse styles together.

J. Weber

DANCE-141 West African Drumming for Dance

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

Using authentic African drums, students will learn to play the various rhythms that accompany the dances taught in the West African dance class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Sylla
Notes: No PE units. Drums will be provided by the instructor. Drummers are encouraged to play for the Dance 142 class following this class, if they are they are not also enrolled in it.

DANCE-142 West African Dance

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture.

M. Sylla, S. Sylla

DANCE-143 Classical Indian Dance

Spring. Credits: 2

This course introduces the fundamentals of movement used in dance and character expressions in the Indian classical and theatrical dance tradition. By employing body movements, hand gestures, props together with masks, the course explores exchanging identity and taking on the persona of "Gods, Demons and Others" in masked creations of expressive and rhythmic sequences. Students learn the basic patterns of formal and folk dance movements including gestural expression in mimetic interpretations through poetry, music compositions and rhythmic structures.

R. Devi

DANCE-144 Tango

Fall. Credits: 2

Argentine Tango is the sensual and elegant social dance of the city of Buenos Aires, which is experiencing a worldwide revival. Cuban Salsa Rueda is a unique Salsa Game developed in Havana, Cuba. Class will include the steps, the history, and anecdotes about the culture of tango and salsa. We will cover traditional and modern forms. All dancers will learn lead and follow, so you do not need a partner. Wear leather-soled shoes or bring socks.

D. Trenner

DANCE-153 Introduction to Percussive Dance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Explore the joy of making music with your feet! This course will give you a foundation in the technique and style of four diverse percussive dance traditions: Appalachian clogging, rhythm tap, Cape Breton step dancing, and body percussion. The class is designed for beginners, and the steps will be broken down into clear, approachable elements. Community, rhythm, playfulness, and musicality will be emphasized. Tap shoes recommended.

E. Grace

DANCE-212 Intermediate Modern: Partnering Technique

Spring. Credits: 2

This course offers tools to generate trust-oriented, intricate, three-dimensional partnering. As a safe and supportive ensemble, students will enter into physical investigations of weight sharing, body-part manipulations, off-balance support, lifting and being lifted, negative space, resistance, and various ways of harnessing forces of momentum. Duets, trios, and groups will collaboratively create set partner dances using a series of construction/reconstruction steps challenging technical range while honoring idiosyncrasy. There will be repeated opportunities in the last part of class to perform.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
P. Matteson
Advisory: Designed for students with some prior dance experience.

DANCE-215 Intermediate Modern

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Practice in personal skills (mobilizing weight, articulating joints, finding center, increasing range, and incorporating strength) and movement expressivity (phrasing, dynamics, and rhythmic acuity).

T. Freedman

DANCE-216 Intermediate Modern

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

C. Fermin
Notes: Meets with Dance 318.

DANCE-216MA Intermediate Modern 2x/week

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

In Intermediate Modern Dance, you will explore contemporary dance as an art form through the development of technical, improvisation, and performance skills. Course work will include varied, challenging movement experiences, improvisation and performance assignments, performance attendance, and exploration of/reflection on your own movement practices.

C. Salyers

DANCE-216MB Intermediate Modern 1x/week

Spring. Credits: 2

Intermediate and Advanced study in modern technique focuses on body level issues of strength, support, alignment, articulation, initiation and performance issues of rhythmic and spatial clarity, intention, embodiment, intricate coordination's and expanding personal vocabularies. Repertory is studied for the last hour of class.

C. Fermin
Notes: Meets with DANCE-318-02.

DANCE-217 Advanced Modern Improvisation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course will focus on the development of improvisational dance skills and the way these inform choreographic sourcing strategies. Classes will begin with improvisational movement explorations that emphasize shifting between the comfortable/familiar and the new/unknown. Students will then collaboratively build movement choreographies using compositional methods that draw from the improvisations. There will be repeated opportunities in the last part of class to perform this material from different points of view.

P. Matteson
Prereq: A college dance course.

DANCE-222 Intermediate Ballet

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is designed for the intermediate-level dancer. It will include a logical and efficient development of exercises culminating with varied allegro combinations. The class will provide the student the opportunity to acquire endurance and learn artistic expression. The importance of musicality within the technique will be a fundamental aspect of the class.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs

DANCE-223 Intermediate Ballet

Spring. Credits: 2

Continues to perfect the classical ballet technique, concentrating on small and big poses at the barre, pirouettes and adagio work in the big poses in the center, and jumps in the small and big poses in the allegro section of the class. More complex grand allegro will be presented.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs

DANCE-227 Ballet IV: Pointe

Fall. Credits: 1

This course will focus on intermediate-to-advanced pointe technique. Class will begin with a condensed barre and center, devoting the last hour to pointe work. Concentration will be placed on strengthening the foot and ankle and the development of artistry within the technique.

M. Madden
Advisory: Intermediate pointe technique level required

DANCE-232 Intermediate Hip-Hop

Fall. Credits: 1

Journey through time and experience the evolution of hip-hop from its old-school social dance roots to the contemporary phenomenon of commercial choreography that hip-hop has become. Using film and text in addition to studio work, this class will create a framework from which to understand and participate in the global culture of hip-hop dance.

S. Johnson
Notes: Audition at first class.

DANCE-233 Intermediate Jazz

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Emphasis on extended movement phrases, complex musicality, and development of jazz dance style.

The department

DANCE-237 Intermediate Tap

Spring. Credits: 2

Tap II expands the movement vocabulary and technical skills of the beginner. Students increase rhythmic accuracy, coordination, and speed by practicing tap rudiments and double-time patterns. The class also includes satisfying time steps and breaks, traveling combinations, and some creative improvisation to deepen the dancer's connection to music. Students will learn at least one complete dance from the traditional tap dance repertory. Video/youtube performances by tap masters, past and present will be shown in class or assigned for out-of-class viewing.

S. Arslanian

DANCE-238 Intermediate Level Musical Theater Jazz & Tap

Fall. Credits: 2

This class is for the intermediate to advanced-level dance student. It is designed to challenge and further develop jazz & tap technique and performance quality, while also teaching students about individual styles of well-known musical theater choreographers. Students will need flat dance shoes,character shoes and tap shoes, and at least an intermediate level of dance technique. Some prior tap experience is a must. There will be a potential audition process to be in this class, therefore students should have a back-up class chosen in case they are not ready for an intermediate-level class.

D. Vega
Advisory: intermediate-level dance ability

DANCE-318 Advanced Modern

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Intermediate and Advanced study in modern technique focuses on body level issues of strength, support, alignment, articulation, initiation, and performance issues of rhythmic and spatial clarity, intention, embodiment, intricate coordinations, and expanding personal vocabularies. Repertory is studied for the last hour of class.

C. Fermin, P. Matteson, C. Salyers
Advisory: Students must pass the Advanced Placement Audition to take this course.
Notes: Meets with DANCE-216MB.

DANCE-324 Advanced Ballet

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is the study of advanced classical ballet technique. The class focuses on the artistry and musicality of movement incorporating turns, adagio, allegro, batterie, and grand allegro.

R. Flachs
Advisory: advanced placement

DANCE-325 Advanced Ballet

Spring. Credits: 2

Course is for advanced dancers and will stress complex classical ballet technique combinations, concentrating on turns at the barre, turns in the big poses in the centre, and batterie in the allegro. Artistry, presentation, and musicality of dance will be incorporated, with the grande allegro serving as the focus of the class. The last half hour will be devoted to advanced pointe technique.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Advisory: Advanced placement