German Studies

Karen Remmler, Chair

Dominique Rampton, Academic Department Coordinator


103 Ciruti Center
413-538-2294
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/german

Overview and Contact Information

The Department of German Studies offers a program that promotes an understanding of the connections between language and its larger cultural contexts worldwide. We prepare students for diverse career paths in today’s globalized world by integrating curricular innovation, experiential opportunities, and learning abroad. Our seminars at all levels facilitate transcultural competence, so that our graduates gain a deeper grasp of their own languages and cultures and a much more substantive level of self-awareness of their own traditions and values.

Language learning in our program emphasizes at all levels the interrelationship between target language and culture and native language and culture; self and community; curriculum and career. We also consistently explore the global interconnections between German and European cultures. We provide opportunities for students to integrate their interest in other subjects with material in our upper-intermediate and advanced-level courses. Furthermore, we encourage our students to seek experiential learning by participating in our exchange with the University of Leipzig, as well as the Berlin School of Economics and Law, and to combine study with internship experience.

Following the credo of Mary Lyon, the department has a proud tradition of connecting its rigorous curricular program with career exploration opportunities for students. We have built an alumnae network to provide current students with assistance when searching for internships or employment either in the U.S. or internationally. Many of these alumnae continued their studies in German and other fields at the most renowned graduate and professional schools in the United States and abroad. Finally, we provide students with support as they apply for internship(s) in German-speaking countries in such fields as science, business, politics, journalism, film, and the arts—to name but a few—as well as study and research and opportunities, including teaching fellowships abroad.

German studies majors graduating from Mount Holyoke College have used the analytical, cultural, and linguistic competence they acquired to pursue a wide range of careers in banking, business, education, government, international affairs, journalism, law, medicine, publishing, radio and television broadcasting, and the sciences.

All department members have Ph.D. training in interdisciplinary German studies and participate in a wide range of interdisciplinary programs. Our courses, therefore, contribute to such programs as critical social thought, gender studies, Jewish studies, and the department of film, media, theater. We strongly recommend that students take courses in other fields related to German and European cultures.

Our entire curriculum, then, supports the study of the German language within its European and global cultural and historical contexts and is adapted to the individual student’s learning style. To facilitate such learning, the department has proved a pioneer in creatively employing the use of technology throughout its curriculum, from elementary courses to advanced seminars. In addition, all our courses focus on developing critical reading, speaking, and writing skills and global competencies in line with the overall learning goals of Mount Holyoke College.

Class time focuses on interpersonal communication among students and with the instructor, and among students and German or near-native peer assistants. From the beginning, students learn strategies for understanding German speakers in a variety of contexts, on many levels, and in diverse situations. When selecting course content materials, we focus on our students’ goals in studying German. In weekly conversation sessions, German or near-native peer assistants provide opportunities for small-group informal conversations. 

Most courses are conducted in German, except first-year seminars, GRMST-205, and GRMST-231. However, students in these courses may receive credit toward the German studies major or minor by enrolling in a related independent study (GRMST-295).

The major in German studies, therefore, integrates learning inside and outside the classroom, the development of language skills with the study of the social, economic, and cultural developments in the German-speaking countries, in the past and present and within a larger transnational context.

The department also encourages students who are studying German or have an interest in Germany to apply to live in the German Language Living Learning Community in order to practice or improve their German while deepening their knowledge of the history and culture of the German-speaking countries. In addition, students have opportunities to interact with German faculty, take part in discussions with guest lecturers, and may also co-host events with the German Club.

Study and Internships Abroad in German-Speaking Countries

A junior year or semester, as well as summer programs and internships in Germany, is open to both majors and non-majors. To be appropriately prepared for study in Germany, students who wish to participate are required to have studied  German continuously, at least one course taught in German each semester, during their first and second years. Majors spending their junior year in a German-speaking country with a program approved by the department and the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives normally satisfy some of the minimum requirements of their major while abroad. By completing appropriate course work, including written work, students majoring in German may transfer the equivalent of one course per semester at the 300 level and additional credits at the 200 level. Minors spending the junior year in a German-speaking country with a program approved by the department and the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives may bring back the equivalent of one course at the 300 level and one course at the 200 level. Upon their return, students are required to participate in at least one course per semester in the department so that faculty can evaluate them based on work done in the senior year when writing recommendations for graduate school or employment opportunities.

The department has an exchange program with the University of Leipzig. In addition, the department participates in the College’s exchange with the Berlin School of Economics and Law. The department encourages students to apply for DAAD scholarships to help finance study abroad in Germany and DAAD RISE internships (for students in STEM fields). The chair and other faculty will assist each student with selecting an individually appropriate opportunities. See the department’s study abroad webpage for more details. Our students frequently spend time abroad, either in their junior year or in the summer. They also take advantage of diverse internship opportunities at German investment banks or brokerage firms, science laboratories, hospitals, newspapers, intercultural agencies, schools, radio and television stations, museums, libraries, archives, and other places of professional interest to them.

Our graduating seniors have consistently been awarded such highly regarded national and international graduate fellowships as DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service), Fulbright, PAD (Pädagogischer Austauschdienst), Congress/Bundestag Fellowship for Young Professionals, Bundestag Internship Program (Internationale Parlaments- Praktika Internship Programm), CDS Emigré Parliamentary/Cultural Vistas Internships, and internships with the European Union.

Learning Goals

Elementary (Completion of Sequence of GRMST-101 and 102, or GRMST-103)

  • Communicate in German on a range of everyday situations. 
  • Produce responses to questions (oral & written) using vocabulary and structures as presented in the lesson plans and texts read. 
  • Understand and produce a variety of text types (personal letters, emails); write (and rewrite) shorter creative essays (Schreibaufgaben) as well as at least 4 progressively longer essays. 
  • Comprehend German grammar requiring some review and more contextualized analysis and discussion on the next level (GRMST-201). 
  • Read and summarize the content of German texts, both orally and in writing, written specifically for German learners, and/or authentic texts written for children or young people in Germany.

Intermediate (GRMST-201)

  • Have a sound understanding of the diversity of contemporary life in the German-speaking world with some in-depth knowledge on specific topics. 
  • Possess global comprehension of authentic materials (including texts, films, videos on YouTube, etc.) and some fine-point knowledge analysis. 
  • Produce spoken and written discourse from description to narration, to formulation of arguments and/or hypotheses, while incorporating an increasing variety of style and complexity. 
  • Improve writing and speaking abilities in German through extensive writing and re-writing of assignments as well as recordings and analysis of oral presentations. 
  • Read at least one (possibly two) longer works written in German.

Advanced Intermediate (Two 200-level classes above GRMST-201)

  • Will know how to work with authentic materials and use acquired knowledge to discuss and understand related issues. 
  • Produce medium-length analytical essays, a final paper (Hausarbeit) similar to those written by students at a German university and narratives based on first-hand experience, fiction, non-fiction, visual texts, and media. 
  • Engage in class discussions, debate, and group interactions in German with relative ease using appropriate vocabulary and produce a basic German university-style Referat. 
  • Analyze visual and printed texts. understand historical perspectives within German cultures that existed prior to the 20th and 21st centuries. 
  • Produce a basic German-style Hausarbeit and acquire a basic knowledge of how to research a topic.

Advanced level (300-level courses)

  • Formulate, develop, present, and document original research questions, their thesis, and arguments made in oral presentations, written abstracts, and group projects in relatively precise German. 
  • Write, with revision(s), an analytical study of at least 12 pages (15-20 pages for the senior seminar) including footnotes and bibliography. 
  • Present analysis of course material, discussion questions, and individual research projects orally (20-minute presentations). 
  • Understand major debates, trajectories, and directions in the field of German studies. Integrate this study with at least one other discipline (e.g., international relations or European studies) and other transnational contexts. 
  • Express analytical ideas, formulate opinions, and discuss topics with relative ease in German.

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Department of German Studies:

Karen Remmler, Mary Lyon Professor of Humanities

Catherine McNally, Visiting Lecturer in German Studies

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 32 credits:

20 credits beyond GRMST-115 drawn from these or other upper-level courses:20
Intermediate German
Decentering Europe: An Introduction to Critical European Studies 1
Lesen, Schreiben, Sprechen 1
German Culture and Histories
Topics in German Studies 2,3
Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context 2
Three additional courses (12 credits), taught in German, at the 300 level including: 312
Advanced Seminar in Transnational and Transdisciplinary German Studies
Total Credits32

Additional Specifications

  • A maximum of 8 credits toward the major may include courses taught in English, such as GRMST-231 or, with permission of the department, other cross-listed topics courses at the 200 or 300 level.

  • As culture is constructed and expressed through language, students are expected to conduct their work in the department and as much work as possible outside the department, in the German language. The major in German studies is intended to provide a focused concentration in the language and culture of the German-speaking countries within transnational European contexts. Students achieve an advanced level of translingual and transcultural competence.

  • Students’ trajectory towards completing the requirements for the German major is based on their level of language proficiency when they enter Mount Holyoke. Individual course selection is to be coordinated with the chair or departmental advisor. 

  • In conjunction with their advisors, students plan an individualized program of study suited to their interests and backgrounds. To ensure breadth of background and context, we strongly encourage students to include at least one pre-twentieth century course and to complement their German Studies major with a second major, minor, Nexus, or Five College certificate. Students may focus on a specific topic, period, or century. Courses focusing on German and/or European culture and taught in other departments or programs may be selected from such fields as anthropology, art, critical social thought, economics, environmental studies, film studies, gender studies, history, history of science, international relations, Jewish studies, music, politics, philosophy, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and theatre arts.

The minor in German studies is intended to provide a focused introduction to the language and culture of German-speaking countries within a larger transnational context. Students achieve a basic level of trans-lingual and transcultural competence.

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 16 credits:

GRMST-205Decentering Europe: An Introduction to Critical European Studies4
At least one 4-credit course at the 300 level in the Department of German Studies4
Two additional 4-credit courses in German Studies beyond GRMST-115:8
The first must be taught in German beyond the 100 level.
The second may include any of the following: 1
GRMST-201, 221, 223 (4 credits, taught in German) 2
GRMST-215 (2 credits, taught in German) 3
GRMST-230, 231 (4 credits, taught in English)
Or an additional course at the 300-level
Total Credits16

Teacher Licensure

Students interested in pursuing licensure in the field of German studies can combine their course work with a minor in education. In some instances, coursework in the major coincides with coursework required for licensure; in other cases, it does not. For more information, please consult your advisor, the chair of the German studies department, information in the catalog on the minor in education and teacher licensure, or the program's website.

Licensure also requires a formal application as well as passing scores on the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in both the literacy component and the subject matter component. Copies of the test objectives for the MTEL are available in the Department of Psychology and Education.

Additional information about the Licensure Program, including application materials, can be found on the Teacher Licensure Program website.

Course Advice

GRMST-231 topics satisfy the Humanities distribution requirement. It may also be possible to count these topics toward the German major or minor with permission of the department.

Courses that satisfy the College language requirement only are designated as such. Other courses can satisfy either the language requirement or fulfill a Humanities distribution requirement.

Advice for New Students

First-Year Seminars offered by German Studies faculty and GRMST-231 are writing-intensive courses taught in English. Both courses are open to first-year students.

Placement in German Courses

The Department of German Studies will review the course selection of all entering students, taking into consideration school and AP records together with the results of the placement exam and answers to the questionnaire at http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/german/german-placement-exam.

All students with prior knowledge of German who plan to elect German in either semester must complete this questionnaire carefully. Final course placement will be based on the following considerations: the student’s specific training in German, the results of the student’s online placement exam, and scheduling possibilities. Students should take the online placement exam prior to registration, if possible.

Students in Groups II–IV, as described below, are required to complete the online questionnaire. Students may choose their courses according to the following guidelines, but all students are encouraged to consult with the chair of the department during the summer or upon arrival on campus. Email: kremmler@mtholyoke.edu

  • Group I: Students with no previous training in German, or with the equivalent of one year of study at the secondary school level, should elect GRMST-101 in the fall, or GRMST-103 in the spring. GRMST-101 and GRMST-102 constitute a yearlong Elementary German course; GRMST-103 is an intensive course that covers two semesters (one year) in one semester.
  • Group II: Students who have studied German for more than one year but for fewer than four years, or who feel they need a comprehensive review of grammar, should elect  GRMST-201. Students entering in the spring who have studied German for one or two years may choose GRMST-102 in consultation with the chair.
  • Group III: Students with three or four years of study in German should ordinarily elect GRMST-221. Students with four or more years of German or extensive experience living in a German-speaking country or speaking German should ordinarily elect GRMST-223 based on the results of the placement exam.
  • Group IV: Other students with previous training in German should consult with the department chair (kremmler@mtholyoke.edu) during the summer or in September for individual placement or enroll in GRMST-223.

All students contemplating spending all or part of their junior year in Germany should elect German in the first semester of their first year, since two continuous years of German in college are normally required for junior year programs in Germany.

Course Offerings

German Studies Courses

GRMST-101 Elementary German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of video and other online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
C. McNally
Coreq: GRMST-101L.
Notes: Requires conversation session (50 minutes). Labs will begin the week after classes start.

GRMST-102 Elementary German

Spring. Credits: 4

Continuation of the elementary German course; practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
C. McNally
Prereq: GRMST-101, or see department for placement. Coreq: GRMST-102L.
Advisory: It is recommended that students have taken GRMST-101, or the equivalent. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.
Notes: Requires conversation session (50 minutes). Labs will begin the week after classes start.

GRMST-103 Intensive Elementary German

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 8

Two semesters in one. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Coreq: GRMST-103L.

GRMST-201 Intermediate German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course emphasizes further development of contextual reading, writing, and speaking skills in German. Focus on strategies that help students learn vocabulary and use grammatical structures in appropriate ways. Discussion of a variety of texts and genres, as well as exploration of topics such as immigration and social justice. Frequent writing assignments and speaking opportunities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. McNally
Coreq: GRMST-201L.
Advisory: It is recommended that students have taken GRMST-101 and GRMST-102, or GRMST-103, or the equivalent. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.

GRMST-205 Decentering Europe: An Introduction to Critical European Studies

Spring. Credits: 4

Europe embodies crossroads of multiple cultures, memories, migrations, and political demarcations. Taking a critical view of conventional paradigms of European nation states and "master" narratives, we study shifting European cultures and identities through multiple perspectives across time and space. What remains of the ancient and modern regimes? How have global movements, historical upheavals, and shifting boundaries within and adjacent to European borders, from early empires to contemporary global networks, affected the transformation of lives? Where is Europe heading today? Faculty from across the disciplines will join us to discuss Europe as a subject of global imagination and networks.

Crosslisted as: CST-249DE, HIST-255DE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

GRMST-215 Lesen, Schreiben, Sprechen

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Intensive practice in reading, writing, and speaking German. Students will write short essays on topics of their choosing, in addition to application letters and a sample resumé for an internship or job in Germany. We will focus also on developing reading strategies and on improving students' ability to converse colloquially, idiomatically, and formally in German. Readings on popular culture, music, as well as current political, social, cultural, historical, and economic issues in the German-speaking world, reflecting student interest and academic focus. Students engage in a variety of speaking activities such as presentations, role-playing and simulations, pair work, and group discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Advisory: GRMST-201 or equivalent recommended,
Notes: Students in GRMST-221 or GRMST-223 are strongly encouraged to enroll in GRMST-215 for additional language practice and review.

GRMST-221 German Culture and Histories

Topics in German Studies provide students with an intensive study of major themes, issues, and paradigm shifts in German cultural studies.

GRMST-221DE German Culture and Histories: 'Decolonial Approaches to German Culture'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course revisits German cultural production (textual and visual representation) through the lens of decolonial practices. We explore how modes of power, transnational exchange, cultural upheaval, and constructions of identity from the mid-18th century to the present are represented in German-speaking realms, both real and imaginary. What role does colonialism play in shaping early and present-day German national identities? How do particular historical movements, events, and narratives create multifaceted constructions of race, gender, and ethnicities? We will address these questions and others through case studies of pivotal moments in German history.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Advisory: Recommended German 201 or higher. Students who have not taken a German language course at Mount Holyoke are required to take the German Language Placement Exam.
Notes: Taught in German. Can be taken for 300-level credit with permission of instructor.

GRMST-221SH German Culture and Histories: 'Stories and Histories'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines historical, cultural, and political developments that continue to frame debates about the twentieth century, World War II, the former GDR, and German unification. Thematic focus helps students develop accuracy, fluency, and complexity of expression. Reading, writing, and speaking are consistently integrated. Special emphasis is placed on text organization toward expanding students' language abilities, with a gradual movement from personal forms of expression to written and public discourse.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Advisory: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German recommended. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-221TC German Culture and Histories: 'Turn of the 20th Century German Life and Culture'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines historical, cultural, and political developments from 1870-71 to 1933. Topics to be discussed will include the unification of Germany into a politically integrated nation state, German industrialization, Expressionism, early German film, and Hitler's rise to power. Thematic focus helps students develop accuracy, fluency, and complexity of expression. Reading, writing, and speaking are consistently integrated. Special emphasis placed on text organization toward expanding students' language abilities, with a gradual movement from personal forms of expression to written and public discourses.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: GRMST-201 or equivalent placement.
Advisory: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German recommended. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.

GRMST-221TH German Culture and Histories: 'Black, Jewish and Muslim Cultures in Germany'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines historical, cultural, and political developments that continue to frame debates about the twentieth century, World War II, the former GDR, German unification, and contemporary German identities. As much as German culture is riddled with extreme examples of persecution and nationalism, the presence of those deemed non-German, such as Black Africans, African Americans, Jews, and Muslims, shape cultural expression and cultural exchange. Drawing from critical race theory, critical ethnic studies, and gender studies, we consider work by non-Germans as well as the representation of others in German canonical and popular cultural production. Thematic focus helps students develop accuracy, fluency, and complexity of expression. Reading, writing, and speaking in German are consistently integrated. Special emphasis is placed on text organization toward expanding students' language abilities, with a gradual movement from personal forms of expression to written and public discourse.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Advisory: GRMST-201, or previous German Studies course, or placement.
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-223 Topics in German Studies

Topics in German Studies provide students with an intensive study of major themes, issues, and paradigm shifts in German cultural studies.

GRMST-223BR Topics in German Studies: 'Berlin: Cultural Memories, Identities, Spaces'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Berlin provides a testing ground for understanding how space shapes memory and identity. Historic sites within the built environment of Berlin mark historical upheaval and reconciliation and the transformation of the periphery into productive sites of commerce and cultural exchange. Multiple historic and contemporary sites will serve as a point of departure to explore the emergence of multidimensional identities in today's Europe. We explore the history, design, function, construction, and, in some cases, destruction, of major historical sites in Berlin, such as the Berlin Wall, the Reichstag, the Museum Island, the Holocaust Memorial, and others through case studies, archival research, and visual media. Students have the option of creating media projects and of drawing from other academic and professional interests.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Prereq: GRMST-201 or GRMST-221.
Advisory: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German recommended. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.
Notes: Taught in German. May be taken for 300-level credit with permission of instructor.

GRMST-223MG Topics in German Studies: 'Migration, Identity, and Place in German Cultures'

Spring. Credits: 4

In 2015, Germany opened its borders to over a million asylum-seekers. The ensuing debates about German national belonging, identity, and rights often overlook the contributions of immigrants, refugees, and displaced persons throughout Europe since the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648). Indeed, migrants continue to shape European and German cultures today. Through close-readings and analyses of visual images, narratives, and films produced by or about the experiences of migrants and refugees from the 18th century to the present, this seminar traces how immigrant cultures shape contemporary German culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Advisory: Students with the equivalent of GRMST-201 or higher are welcome to enroll.
Notes: Taught in German. The course may also be taken for 300-level credit with permission of instructor.

GRMST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GRMST-311 Advanced German Composition and Conversation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class offers intensive work in oral and written expression in German. Frequent papers and other exercises aimed at revising grammatical structures, improving students' writing in German, and broadening their comprehension of content and style. Oral reports, class discussion, and team exercises. Students will also have the option of completing an ongoing project of interest to them such as creating a YouTube channel or developing independent videos.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: One four-credit course above GRMST-201.
Advisory: German. Incoming students who have not taken German at Mount Holyoke should take the placement exam to determine proper course level.
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-325 Advanced Seminar in Transnational and Transdisciplinary German Studies

Fall. Credits: 4

What constitutes contemporary German culture within global perspectives? How might we apply critical race theory, critical social theory, ethnic studies, and queer studies, in order to interpret trajectories of German cultures, histories, and memories? Building on interdisciplinary close-readings of German-speaking cultural production ranging from novels to documentary film, students develop a research topic that spans the humanities, sciences, and/or social sciences. Students may build on previous scholarly work in German studies and other disciplines, community-based learning, internships, and/or learning abroad to consider major concepts, issues, or problems in an original manner.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Prereq: Open to all students who have completed the equivalent of GRMST-223, have been placed into a 300-level course based on the placement exam, or with permission of the instructor.
Notes: Taught in German. Required seminar for German majors and highly recommended for minors.

GRMST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context 

GRMST-231 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

An introduction to critical analysis of narrative and visual texts, cultural representation and production. Courses are taught in English.

GRMST-231HC Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Remembering the Holocaust in Global Perspectives'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores the impact of different cultural forms of remembering the Holocaust within a global perspective. At the same time that the European Holocaust continues to be remembered, subsequent genocides and related mass violence around the globe are being remembered through multiple forms of memorialization, such as art, film, memorials, and narratives that mirror particular material and virtual forms of remembering the Holocaust. We explore how the interrelationship between Holocaust remembrance and other atrocities drives discussions about subsequent genocides, current antisemitism and racism, and forms of remembering violence.

Crosslisted as: JWST-225HC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Notes: Taught in English. Optional 2-credit group discussion in German (GRMST-295) for students who wish to hone their German speaking and research skills.

GRMST-231NT Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Black, Jewish, and Muslim Cultures in Germany: Intersectionalities of Othering'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

As much as German culture is riddled with extreme examples of persecution and nationalism, the presence of those deemed non-German, such as Black Africans, African Americans, Jews, and Muslims, shaped cultural expression and cultural exchange. In this seminar we explore the expression of otherness as portrayed in literature, film, and art from the eighteenth through twenty-first Centuries. Drawing from critical race theory, critical ethnic studies, and gender studies, we consider work by non-Germans as well as the representation of others in German canonical and popular cultural production.

Crosslisted as: JWST-225NT, CST-249NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Notes: Taught in English. Optional 2-credit group discussion in German (GRMST-295) for students who wish to hone their German speaking and research skills.