Politics

Andrew Reiter, Chair

Linda Chesky Fernandes, Academic Department Coordinator


109A Skinner Hall
413-538-2381
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/politics

Overview and Contact Information

The word “politics” in ordinary conversations may refer to struggles for power or justice among antagonistic individuals or groups; the types of regimes by which people are governed; the ties that bind subjects to rulers or citizens to states; the election of representatives, passage of laws, and voicing of public opinion in democratic societies; and international relations among different polities, whether they be empires, multinational federations, or nation-states. The phrase “international politics” encompasses the waging of war and conducting of peace, the pursuit of national interests in competition with other states, norms of interaction among sovereign states, projects of humanitarian intervention, and collective efforts to enhance state security, global order, and human rights.

The study of such a complex subject has traditionally been divided into four overlapping fields:

  • Political theory tackles the contested meanings of freedom, equality, power, justice, community, and individuality, as well as the clashing ideological perspectives by which different people make sense of political life. It also explores the ideas of influential political theorists from Plato to Thomas Hobbes to Hannah Arendt.
  • American politics studies the history and current organization of political institutions at the national, state, and local level in the United States. It also examines conflicts in America over private rights and material interests; racial, class, and gender inequality; and public goods, including the good of American citizenship itself.
  • Comparative politics covers the spectrum of political histories, systems of government, public policies, political parties, and social movements across the world. It examines, for example, parliamentary systems, ethnic conflict, authoritarian regimes, immigration policy, and nationalist movements from Asia to Europe to the Americas to Africa and the Middle East.
  • International politics investigates U.S. foreign policy, international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, and the International Criminal Court; the politics of population migrations; war, terrorism, and international security; and the political dilemmas sparked by economic globalization and such border-crossing problems as resource depletion and environmental decay.

The Department of Politics at Mount Holyoke College offers students courses within all four fields as well as courses that cross the lines between them.

See Also

Learning Goals

Students in the Politics major should:

  • Understand political systems at the local, national, and international levels, and how they relate to one another.
  • Acquire the vocabulary with which to analyze historical and contemporary political thought and developments.
  • Demonstrate the ability to investigate political questions and to write and speak cogently about their findings.
  • Critically assess texts, speeches, and other forms of political communication, and the academic political science literature.
  • Understand what it means to be a thoughtful and active citizen, engaging in debates about justice and power.

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Department of Politics:

Sohail Hashmi, Professor of International Relations on the Alumnae Foundation and Professor of Politics

Kavita Khory, Ruth Lawson Professor of Politics; Carol Hoffmann Collins Director of the McCulloch Center for Global Initiatives

Elizabeth Markovits, Professor of Politics; Associate Dean of Faculty

Preston Smith II, Class of 1926 Professor of Politics

Jon Western, Carol Hoffmann Collins '63 Professor of International Studies and Five College Professor of International Relations

Calvin Chen, Associate Professor of Politics

Andy Reiter, Associate Professor of Politics and International Relations

Ali Aslam, Assistant Professor of Politics, On Leave 2021-2022

Cora Fernandez Anderson, Assistant Professor of Politics

Adam Hilton, Assistant Professor of Politics

Christopher Mitchell, Assistant Professor of International Relations and Politics, Teaching Spring Only

Anna Daily, Visiting Lecturer in Politics

Susanne Mueller-Redwood, Visiting Lecturer in Politics

Bryan Nakayama, Visiting Lecturer in International Relations and Politics

Robert Darrow, Visiting Instructor in Politics

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 32 credits:

Subfield Requirements
One course must be taken in each of the four subfields, ordinarily to be selected from the list below: 116
American politics:
American Politics
Constitutional Law: The Federal System
Civil Liberties
American Political Thought
Comparative politics:
Comparative Politics
Chinese Politics
Contemporary Russian Politics
Middle East Politics
East Asian Politics
Introduction to Latin American Politics
African Politics
International politics:
World Politics
Introduction to International Political Economy
International Law and Organization
American Foreign Policy
Political theory:
Introduction to Political Ideas
Introduction to Feminist Theory
American Political Thought
300-level Course Work Requirements
Three courses (12 credits) at the 300 level: 2,312
Two of which (8 credits) must be taken at Mount Holyoke College
The remaining course (4 credits) may be completed at another institution, subject to departmental approval
4 additional credits in politics at the 200 or 300 level4
Total Credits32

Additional Specifications

  • With the permission of the department chair, a class transferred in from another institution that is less than 4 credits may fulfill one of the subfield requirements. All students, however, need 32 credits overall to complete the major.

Requirements for the Minor

At least 16 credits:

12 credits in politics at the 200 level or above12
At least 4 credits in politics at the 300 level4
Courses must span at least two of the department’s four subfields: 1
American Politics
Comparative Politics
International Politics
Political Theory
Total Credits16

Additional Specifications

  • Students must obtain the approval of the department chair at the time they register for their next-to-last semester.

Teacher Licensure

Students interested in pursuing licensure in the field of politics can combine their course work in politics with a minor in education. In some instances course work in the major coincides with course work required for licensure; in other cases, it does not. For specific course requirements for licensure within the major of politics, please consult your advisor or the chair of the politics department. Further information about the minor in education and the Teacher Licensure program is available in other sections of the catalog, and consult Professor Lawrence in the psychology and education department.

Licensure also requires a formal application as well as passing scores on the Massachusetts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) in both the literacy component and the subject matter component. Copies of the test objectives for the MTEL are available in the politics department and in the Department of Psychology and Education.

Additional information about the Licensure Program, including application materials, can be found on the Teacher Licensure Program website.

Course Offerings

POLIT-104 American Politics

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Offers an overview of the American political system and the theories of those who both celebrate and criticize it. Focuses on the institutions of American politics, including the Constitution, the presidency, Congress, the courts, parties, elections, interest groups, and movements seeking political change. Also includes a theoretical focus: a critical examination of the varieties of liberalism, conservatism, pluralism, and democracy that inform the practice of American politics.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Hilton, R. Darrow, P. Smith

POLIT-106 Comparative Politics

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to comparative political analysis, one of the four subfields of political science. The primary objective is to help students understand how the 'modern' world, one characterized by the rise of industrialized nation-states, took form and what shape it might take in the post-Cold War era. We will examine how the challenges of economic development, social transformation, and nation-building sparked the emergence of alternatives to 'modernity' characterized by diverse configurations of political institutions and social forces. We will also assess how globalization and the re-emergence of local identities may be redefining our understanding of 'modernity.'

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Chen, R. Darrow, C. Fernandez Anderson, The department

POLIT-116 World Politics

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a survey of contending approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world politics. Examines key concepts--including balance of power, imperialism, collective security, deterrence, and interdependence--with historical examples ranging from the Peloponnesian War to the post-cold war world. Analyzes the emerging world order.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi, K. Khory, C. Mitchell, S. Mueller-Redwood, B. Nakayama, A. Reiter

POLIT-118 Introduction to Political Ideas

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the study of political thought, focusing on such concepts as freedom, power, equality, justice, and democracy. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a theoretical vocabulary with which to analyze both the history of political thought and contemporary politics. This course is writing-intensive; students will have the opportunity to rigorously analyze texts and hone their ability to write confidently and effectively.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Aslam, A. Daily, E. Markovits

POLIT-208 Chinese Politics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the politics of contemporary China. Beginning with an assessment of the origins of the Chinese Revolution, the course then examines core institutions and events in the People's Republic, including the Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, post-Mao reforms, and the Tiananmen Incident. In addition, the course analyzes the changing nature of state-society relations, the emergence of new social and political identities, and China's role in the international arena.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Chen
Advisory: Politics 106 recommended.

POLIT-209 Contemporary Russian Politics

Fall. Credits: 4

Russia was transformed by communist revolution into a global superpower that challenged the dominant ideologies of liberalism and nationalism. It became a powerful alternative to capitalism. In 1991, this imperial state collapsed and underwent an economic, political, and cultural revolution. What explains the Soviet Union's success for 70 years and its demise in 1991? What sort of country is Russia as it enters the twenty-first century? Is it a democracy? How has Russia's transformation affected ordinary people and Russia's relationship to the West?

Crosslisted as: RES-240
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Jones

POLIT-212 Modern Political Thought

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Through readings authored by cannonical thinkers such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Nietzsche, Burke, but also more contemporary thinkers reflecting on the emergence and practices of modern state power and discourses, we will trace the development of key political concepts such as sovereignty, the "science" of politics, natural rights, rationality, and tradition, in order to weigh the promise and peril of each idea.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Aslam
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

POLIT-216 Middle East Politics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduction to the peoples and politics of the Middle East. Begins with the historical situation of the region in the early twentieth century and challenges to the Ottoman Empire. Traces how the clash of nationalisms and imperialisms shaped the emergence of independent states before and after World War II, the rise of Pan-Arab and Zionist ideologies, the subsequent Arab-Israeli conflicts, the intra-Arab disputes, and the superpower rivalry and its influence on regional politics.

Crosslisted as: JWST-216
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-218 Israel/Palestine: Fact/Fiction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar traces the evolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through autobiography, novels, and film. It focuses on the birth of Israel and the creation of a Palestinian diaspora, the toll war and terrorism have taken on both sides, and the mental and physical barriers that separate Israelis and Palestinians today.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi

POLIT-224 The United States and Iran

Spring. Credits: 4

Explores America's relationship with Iran from the end of World War II to the present. Examines America's close ties to the Shah and the political, social, and economic causes of the Iranian revolution, with emphasis on the role of Shi'ite Islam. Concludes with analysis of politics and society in the Islamic Republic under Khomeini and his successors.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-226 The United States, Israel, and the Arabs

Fall. Credits: 4

Surveys the constants and variables in U.S. foreign policy toward Israel and the Arabs since the end of World War II to the present. Analysis of domestic determinants of U.S. policy, including lobbies, ideology, and the international system. Consideration of U.S. policy in the Arab-Israeli conflict, intra-Arab disputes, and the Gulf War.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-228 East Asian Politics

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the dramatic rise of East Asia in the post-World War II period in comparative perspective. The focus will be on understanding the process and consequences of rapid development in Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and China. Assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the 'East Asian model of development' and explores how different developmental experiences and policies affect state-society relations, social and political identities, and prospects for peace and cooperation throughout the region.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Chen
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: POLIT-106 recommended

POLIT-230 Resistance and Revolution

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the dynamics and causes of protest, rebellion, and revolution. Topics include the three 'great' revolutions - the French, Russian, and Chinese - as well as such social science theories as moral economy, rational choice, resource mobilization, political culture, and relative deprivation. Attention will be devoted to peasant protest and elite responses to resistance movements. The objectives of the class are to familiarize students with alternative explanations of revolutionary change and to provide students with an opportunity to link general theories to specific case studies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Chen
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.
Advisory: POLIT-106 recommended.

POLIT-232 Introduction to International Political Economy

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the theory and practice of the politics of international trade and economics, focusing on the spread of global trade, global financial flows, causes and effects of globalization and migration, and the intersection of trade and environmental issues. Major themes include tensions between the developed and developing world, various development strategies, and the impact of a rising China on both the developed North American and European economies and developing economies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Mitchell
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-233 Introduction to Feminist Theory

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the overlapping dualities of the feminine and the masculine, the private and the public, the home and the world. We examine different forms of power over the body; the ways gender and sexual identities reinforce or challenge the established order; and the cultural determinants of 'women's emancipation.' We emphasize the politics of feminism, dealing with themes that include culture, democracy, and the particularly political role of theory and on theoretical attempts to grasp the complex ties and tensions between sex, gender, and power.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Daily, E. Markovits
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

POLIT-234 Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama

Spring. Credits: 4

Black Metropolis refers to the more than half a million black people jammed into a South Side ghetto in Chicago at mid-twentieth century that featured an entrenched black political machine, a prosperous black middle class, and a thriving black cultural scene in the midst of massive poverty and systemic inequality. This course will follow the political, economic, and cultural developments of what scholars considered to be the typical urban community in postwar United States. We will examine such topics as Martin Luther King's failed desegregation campaign; Harold Washington, first black mayor; William Julius Wilson's urban underclass thesis; and the rise of Barack Obama.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-234
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
P. Smith

POLIT-235 Constitutional Law: The Federal System

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the impact of U.S. constitutional law on the legitimacy of different assertions of governmental power. Topics include judicial review; congressional control of court jurisdiction; federal regulation of the economy; and the relative powers and authority of the president, Congress, and the courts in national emergencies, foreign relations, war, and covert action, including torture and assassination. Case method.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Hilton
Prereq: POLIT-104.

POLIT-236 Civil Liberties

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course addresses the federal Constitution and civil liberties. Topics include the authority of the courts to read new rights into the Constitution; equal protection of the laws and affirmative action for racial minorities, women, gays, and non-citizens. Also, freedoms of expression, association, and the press. Emphasis on the appropriateness of different methods of interpreting law. Case method.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Prereq: POLIT-104.

POLIT-243 Introduction to Latin American Politics

Fall. Credits: 4

Why has Latin America struggled to achieve democratic stability? Why is it the region of the world with the highest economic inequality? How have the periodic political and economic crises allowed for creative experimentation with policy alternatives to create a more equal and sustainable social order? This course examines the political and economic evolution and transformation of Latin America from the time of the European conquest until these very days, with a particular focus on the 20th century. It will also analyze how these general trends took specific shapes in each of the 7 countries studied: Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Chile, Venezuela and Bolivia.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Fernandez Anderson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Politics 106 (Comparative Politics) is recommended.

POLIT-246 American Political Thought

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores limited government, popular sovereignty, representative institutions, checks and balances, republicanism, liberty, equality, democracy, pluralism, liberalism, and conservatism, and how these concepts have developed during three centuries of American politics and in contrast to European thought. The focus is not on the writings of the 'great thinkers' but on the 'habits of thought' of the American people and on ideas implicit in laws and institutions that affect the allocation of authority and power within the constitutional order.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Daily
Prereq: POLIT-104, or HIST-270, or HIST-170 and HIST-171.

POLIT-247 International Law and Organization

Spring. Credits: 4

This course presents international norms and institutions for regulating conflict, including promoting economic well-being, protecting human rights, exploring and using outer space, and controlling exploitation and pollution of the oceans. The course considers international agreements, problems of lawmaking, interpretation, and compliance; nationality and the status of foreigners and their investments; the principle of self-determination; and interests of postcolonial states as they impinge on the international legal order.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Reiter
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

POLIT-248 Topics in Politics

POLIT-248GR Topics in Politics: 'Grassroots Democracy'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The central focus of this course is to explore theory and organizing practices of grassroots democracy. Each week the seminar will move back and forth between historical and theoretical reflection and reflection upon the experience of organizing communities. The course is motivated by citizens acting together to generate responses to the most challenging questions and issues of the present.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Aslam

POLIT-248PM Topics in Politics: 'Parties and Movements in American Politics'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the relationship between political parties and social movements in the United States. Through a historical examination of abolitionist, labor, civil rights, and other movements, we will analyze how formal electoral politics intersects with the more fluid politics of protest and direct action. We will look at how parties have grown out of, allied with, co-opted or eschewed movements for social change. Students will develop a clear analytical sense of the conditions that facilitate successful movement-party dynamics, concluding with critical assessments concerning the impact of the Tea Party, Occupy Wall Street, and Black Lives Matter.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Hilton
Prereq: POLIT-104.

POLIT-248TE Topics in Politics: 'Science, Technology and Public Policy'

Spring. Credits: 4

As numerous controversies have made clear -- from Galileo's heresy trial to contemporary disputes over vaccination -- the purportedly neutral and objective results of scientific inquiry are in practice hotly contested and profoundly political. Students in this course will critically examine science and technology as social practices, in the hope of becoming more responsible users of these powerful tools. Course topics include how scientific and technical knowledge are produced and disseminated, how scientific and technical experts contribute to the policymaking process, and how research and innovation are governed through legislation, regulation, institutions, social norms and movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
R. Darrow

POLIT-249 African Politics

Fall. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a historically informed comparative study of African politics. The course views Africa as a distinct region with a vital role in the international system, reviewing major theories designed to explain patterns of African politics and the variations between and within African states. The course is motivated by the need to understand the legacies of colonialism, the relative weakness of the African state, and the variation of political and economic development in the continent. Finally, the course examines some aspects of social change and political reforms in post-independence Africa, such as democratization, international relations, and the role of civil society.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
The department

POLIT-252 Urban Politics

Fall. Credits: 4

This course draws on both historical and contemporary sources to address critical issues and problems facing cities. Topics are organized around the following questions: How have cities come to take their shape and character over time? How are economic and social inequalities mapped onto the urban landscape? How are differences of race, class, and gender negotiated through urban institutions and community struggles?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
P. Smith
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Introductory course in American history or social sciences.

POLIT-255 Gender and Power in Global Contexts

POLIT-255PA Gender and Power in Global Contexts: 'The Politics of Abortion in the Americas'

Spring. Credits: 4

The Americas have been characterized by the strictness of their laws in the criminalization of abortion. In some countries abortion is criminalized even when the woman's life is at risk. What role have women's movements played in advancing abortion rights? What has mattered most for a movement's success, its internal characteristics or external forces? Has the way the movement framed its demands mattered? How has the political influence of the Catholic and Evangelical churches influenced policies in this area? We will answer these questions by exploring examples from across the region through primary and secondary sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Fernandez Anderson

POLIT-267 The Politics of Finance and Financial Crises

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The development and operation of stable and effective banks and financial markets has a tremendous impact on the economy and political stability of rich and poor countries alike. A stable financial system may be a necessity for economic growth and a financial crisis can wipe out decades of growth in weeks. This course will critically examine the debates around regulation of finance and management of financial crises in both the advanced capitalist states and emerging markets. It will examine specifically the Latin American debt crisis, the East Asian financial crisis, the 2007-2009 trans-Atlantic financial crisis, and the European debt crisis.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Mitchell
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

POLIT-269 Social Movements: Theory and Praxis

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Why do people mobilize? When do they do so? Why and how do they create movements? Are social movements successful paths towards social change? If so, under which conditions? This course will review the main theories of social movements and use them to analyze cases from around the world. Some of the cases we will take upon are the Arab Spring, the American civil rights movement, women and indigenous movements in Latin America, the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, and the environmental movement in Europe.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. Fernandez Anderson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: POLIT-106 (Comparative Politics) is recommended.

POLIT-270 American Foreign Policy

Fall. Credits: 4

In this examination of American foreign policy since 1898, topics include the emergence of the United States as a global power, its role in World War I and II, its conduct and interests in the cold war, and its possible objectives in a post-cold war world. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between domestic interests and foreign policy, the role of nuclear weapons in determining policy, and the special difficulties in implementing a democratic foreign policy.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
B. Nakayama
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-278 U.S. Elections

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Elections are at the core of both the vitality and fragility of American democracy. Free and responsive government is hard to imagine without elections, yet U.S. elections suffer from relatively low turnout, increasing polarization, invisible money, racial and gender inequality, partisan gerrymandering, and new forms of voter disenfranchisement. This course offers students an overview of American elections by placing the November elections in historical and comparative perspective and following their development in real time. Students will also gain on-the-ground experience working in the local community as voter registrants and get-out-the-vote activists in the run-up to the November elections. By then end of the semester, students will have developed an in-depth understanding of the workings of American electoral institutions and behavior as well as transferrable skills for organizing and mobilizing political action.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Hilton
Prereq: POLIT-104.

POLIT-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

POLIT-300 Democracy and Its Challengers: Populism, Nationalism, and Autocracy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

After the collapse of the USSR, liberal democracy was triumphant, and history was "dead." But the new states in Central and Eastern Europe, and the revived democracies in Africa and South America soon revealed the difficulty of building and preserving liberal democracy. The challenges of populism, xenophobia, inequality, and judicial and electoral manipulation, reemerged in both Western Europe and the USA. Based on case studies from Europe, the Americas, and Africa, we will focus on the vulnerabilities of democracy, and on the sources of illiberalism's success among both European and non-European states. What explains the decline of democracy, and what measures can democratic systems take to defend themselves?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Prereq: Two 200-level courses in Politics, International Relations, History, Sociology, or Economics.

POLIT-305 International Society

Spring. Credits: 4

An intensive reading course in theories of international society: the idea that states and peoples are or should be linked to each other through a web of shared values and institutions. It focuses on the work of Hedley Bull, Immanuel Kant, and John Rawls. How did these three men understand international society? What are or should be the values and institutions that give rise to it and support it? What implications do their visions of international society have for war and peace, state sovereignty, religion, democracy, capitalism, distributive justice, human rights, and international law? What responses and criticisms have their arguments engendered?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-312 Silk Roads: Ancient and Modern Highways across the Eurasian Continent

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The silk roads were ancient transportation and trade links that wound their way across the Eurasian continent, or by sea through the South China Sea and Indian Ocean, to Europe. They carried silk, glass, jade, and moved religions and literatures across continents. Today, the new silk roads carry oil, gas, drugs, capitalism, and immigrants seeking better lives. We will investigate the parallels between the ancient and modern silk roads and the contemporary strategic, cultural, and economic significance of these new highways, which link China, Central Asia, the Middle East, South Asia, and Europe.

Crosslisted as: RES-312
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics, International Relations, History, or Russian and Eurasian studies.

POLIT-314 Political Violence: Causes and Solutions

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an examination of political violence. Throughout the semester, the course covers the various manifestations of political violence, focusing on diverse topics such as genocide, ethnic conflict, interstate war, terrorism, and civil war. The course explores the debates in the field of political science regarding the nature and causal factors behind these types of violence. The course also examines how to end violence, how to maintain peace, and how societies should attempt to heal from periods of violence.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Reiter
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-315 The United States and the Promotion of Democracy and Human Rights

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines American foreign policy concerning the promotion of democracy and human rights abroad. The course begins by examining how and why these policies are developed within the U.S. political, economic, institutional, and geostrategic context. Through the use of case studies, we will then evaluate how these policies have influenced events in Latin America, East Asia, Eastern Europe, and sub-Saharan and southern Africa.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Western
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-319 War: What Is It Good For?

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A multidisciplinary exploration of the ways humans have understood, represented, experienced, and justified war over time and across cultures. Using art, literature, and film in addition to social scientific research, this course considers the many different meanings war has in human societies. It analyzes possible causes of war, including innate human drives, gender differences, socialization, regimes, and ideological and resource competition in a condition of international anarchy. It probes how war is experienced by soldiers and civilians. Finally, it examines justifications for war from a range of ethical perspectives.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

POLIT-323 Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course presents the rise (and sometimes collapse) of modern states in the Middle East; the nature of legitimacy, modernization, state-civil society relations, and political culture and economy; and the role of religion with specific reference to Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics including POLIT-106 or POLIT-216.

POLIT-324 Comparative Politics of N. Africa

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course applies theories of comparative politics to the countries of North Africa. It explores the similarities and differences in the political development of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya since the end of World War II. Specific topics include political culture, state-building, legitimacy, democratization, and political economy.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics including POLIT-106 or POLIT-216.

POLIT-327 Transitional Justice

Fall. Credits: 4

As societies emerge from authoritarian rule or civil war, they face the daunting task of engaging past human rights violations. States have a myriad of options at their disposal, ranging from granting blanket amnesties to hosting complex trials and truth commissions. In making these decisions, new leaders face pressures from former authoritarian actors, victims' groups, and international organizations. This course analyzes the problems facing societies with past human rights violations, the numerous options they have at their disposal to engage these abuses, and the political, legal, economic, and moral ramifications of each choice. Most importantly, it asks--does transitional justice work?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Reiter
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-333 Just War and Jihad: Comparative Ethics of War and Peace

Fall. Credits: 4

Why do we moralize about war? When is war justified, if ever? What restraints should soldiers accept? This course examines these issues within the context of Western and Islamic thought. Study of the origins and evolution of both traditions is combined with consideration of important topics of current concern, such as intervention, weapons of mass destruction, and women and war.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-341 Political Islam

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course covers Islamic responses to European imperialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly the emergence of Islamic modernism; the growth of Islamic movements in the Arab world and South Asia and their responses to secular nationalism and socialism; and a survey of the ends to which religion is applied in three types of regimes: patrimonial Saudi Arabia, revolutionary Iran, and military-authoritarian Pakistan.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-342 Islamic Political Thought

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines Islamic political thought from the origins of Islam to the present. It considers how Muslim thinkers over the past 14 centuries have understood such fundamental political concepts as the state, leadership, and law. The seminar also includes modern Muslim reflections on political concepts of Western origin, such as democracy, nationalism, and civil society.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116 and 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-343 Law and Religion

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the relationship between law and religion through a comparative study of eight countries: the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Israel, and India. It focuses on the role of religion in the constitutional law of these countries, both in the text of constitutional documents and in judicial interpretation of these texts. Starting with an analysis of the religion clauses in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the seminar explores questions relating to the separation of religion and state, religious liberty, and the proper role of courts in negotiating societal disputes over religion.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-350 Revolutions

Fall. Credits: 4

By the 1980s, after the failure of Marxist revolutions, scholars and politicians declared that "history" and with it, the age of revolution was over. From now on, they said, all states will move toward the model of market capitalism. But the last decade of the 20th century and the first fifteen years of the 21st century have shown that history, and with it, revolution, is far from over. We will look at the American and Russian revolutions, at Nazism, the Iranian revolution of 1979, Eastern Europe in 1989, the 'colored revolutions,' and the Arab Spring. Revolutions are still with us, and we will study why.

Crosslisted as: RES-350
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Jones
Prereq: 8 credits in politics, international relations, or Russian and Eurasian studies.

POLIT-354 Social Housing

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines public housing policy in the United States from the 1930s to the present. It will examine the historical, social, and political factors in the development of social housing in the U.S. In particular it will focus on the role of class, ethnicity, race, and immigration on the evolution of social housing policy. It investigates the more recent impact of neoliberalism on the nation's ability to provide affordable housing to its citizens. Students will engage in community-based research on affordable housing in communities in the Pioneer Valley.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
P. Smith
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: POLIT-104 or POLIT-252 or 8 credits in Politics.
Notes: This course will be linked with Professor Vanessa Rosa's Latinas/os/x and Housing course (LATST-349MC). Students from both courses will share a classroom for speakers and films.

POLIT-355 Race and Housing

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the role of race in the construction of housing markets and policies in United States. It will consider housing markets and policies in the larger context of postwar American Political Development. We will also examine how African Americans, Latinx, Asian Americans, and whites embraced, accommodated, and protested segregated housing markets and discriminatory policies. Topics discuss include racial and class segregation, fair housing, public housing, urban redevelopment, and gentrification.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
P. Smith
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics including POLIT-104, POLIT-234, or POLIT-252.

POLIT-357 War and Peace in South Asia

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Rising inequality, political instability, and radicalism mark South Asia -- a region of contested histories, ideologies, and territories. We will explore the history and causes of enduring conflicts such as Kashmir and the wars in Afghanistan, separatist movements in Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka, and potential conflicts over scarce water and energy resources. We will conclude with analysis of the role of external powers in South Asia, for example, China and the U.S., and assess the prospects for peace in the region.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
K. Khory
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from Politics.

POLIT-359 Democratization and Civil Society in East Asia

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the dramatic emergence of democratic institutions and civil society in East Asia. The primary aim of the class is to help students understand and analyze the process of democratic unfolding in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. We will also evaluate China's recent, albeit limited experiments with democratic practices. We will begin by contrasting Western perspectives of democracy with both traditional and more contemporary Asian understandings of democracy. We will then focus on the actual processes of democratic consolidation in each of the cases, especially the developments that precipitated political crisis and ultimately, political change.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Chen
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

POLIT-363 Political Economy of the European Union

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the political, economic, and cultural forces driving debates around the creation, expansion, and reform of the European Union. It examines the economic and political logic for integration, as well as the cultural and economic challenges pushing against integration, and provides an in-depth look at the specific challenges facing the EU.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Mitchell
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics/International Relations.

POLIT-365 Ethics and International Relations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Do ethical considerations matter in international relations? Should they? These questions are examined from the perspective of Western writers on these specific issues: just war, intervention, human rights, weapons of mass destruction, and distributive justice. The course also considers challenges to the international system posed by the critiques and responses of non-Western states and peoples.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

POLIT-366 Global Migration

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines voluntary and forced migrations from local, regional and global perspectives. It focuses on contemporary population movements and their historical antecedents, paying particular attention to colonial legacies and the immigration policies of European states and the U.S. We will debate the costs and benefits of migration, the ethical and normative implications of asylum policies and the treatment of refugees, and rights and obligations of citizenship. The course concludes with an analysis of the global compact for migration and the institutional and legal frameworks for protecting migrant rights and refugees.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Khory
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 Credits from Politics

POLIT-377 American Political Development

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

When and why does politics change in the United States? How do past transformations shape later political and policy choices? This course combines historical, institutional, and comparative perspectives to examine the growth and development of American political institutions and the evolution of state-society relations in the U.S. Key themes include: the distinctive or "exceptional" status of American politics compared to other advanced democracies; the role of culture and ideas in shaping American institutions and civic identities over time; and the ways in which race and gender have figured historically in the articulation of state power.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Hilton
Prereq: POLIT-104.

POLIT-383 Art and Politics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course will investigate the relationship between art, community, and power. Drawing on a wide range of political theory and literature, this writing-intensive seminar will focus on the ways that art has both informed and been informed by political and economic life, and the ways in which art can serve as a form of political activism. Although the course will cover a variety of time periods and art forms, we will pay particular attention to such contemporary political issues as racialized oppression, climate change, and feminist activism.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
E. Markovits
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Advisory: Previous coursework in political theory or philosophy is recommended (especially POLIT-118).

POLIT-384 Ending War and Securing the Peace: Conflict Mediation and Resolution in the 21st Century

Spring. Credits: 4

How do we end political violence and achieve peace? This course focuses on the context for negotiation and bargaining strategies, including what types of actors are involved in negotiations, the contours of the mediation environment, the timing of intervention and talks, the use of leverage to get warring parties to the table, and the transformation of processes across multiple stages from initial mediation to implementation to enforcement. The course also examines several peacemaking strategies in depth, including resource sharing, territorial autonomy and partitions, elections and powersharing agreements, refugee crisis management,and demobilization and reintegration programs.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Reiter
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-385 International Security

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on the recasting of global security concerns after the end of the cold war. It pays special attention to the problems of economic and ecological security; the relationship between security and democracy; humanitarian intervention; nuclear proliferation; and terrorism. The course concludes with analysis of specific initiatives for achieving both common and comprehensive security.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Khory
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from Politics including POLIT-116.

POLIT-387 Advanced Topics in Political Theory

POLIT-387BW Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Black Women Activists'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate the contributions of Black Women Activists to the Black Radical Tradition. Beginning with abolitionists Sojourner Truth and Harriet Tubman and anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells, students will study the lines of continuity that link this generation to later figures in the Labor and Civil Rights movements, such as Ella Baker, as well as Black Feminists including the Combahee River Collective, poet Audre Lorde, and the leadership of the current Movement for Black Lives. Students will study the practices of these activists against the backdrop of the larger struggles for Black liberation.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Aslam
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387CP Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Agency, Solidarity, and Action: Theories of Coalitional Politics'

Fall. Credits: 4

What are political coalitions? Why do coalitions form? What is their value? What tactics do they employ and why? What causes them to fall apart? These are the guiding questions of this seminar in contemporary political theory. We will explore theories of political coalitions -- sometimes called alliances -- and the core normative and analytic concepts that guide them such as agency, solidarity, and action. We will take a look at coalitions as constructed through shared identities, ideologies, and interests, paying special attention to issues of gender, race, class, and (dis)ability. And, we will try to understand not just why coalitions come together, but also, why they fall apart -- as well as what we might do about it.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Daily
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.
Advisory: Previous experience in political theory strongly encouraged (for example, Political Ideas or Feminist Theory).

POLIT-387CY Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Cyberpolitics'

Spring. Credits: 4

For many, the "cyber-revolution" has fundamentally altered all aspects of human existence through the creation of a new space of interaction: cyberspace. This course asks whether and to what extent cyberspace has revolutionized the nature of international politics. Are traditional understandings of sovereignty, deterrence, and diplomacy bunk? Rather than engaging in speculation, this course will cover the history of the development of both cyberspace and the beliefs that it will revolutionize politics. By examining the distance between speculation and reality this course will provide a grounded understanding of the effects of the "cyber-revolution" on international politics.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Nakayama
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387EP Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Environmental Political Thought'

Fall. Credits: 4

The planetary systems on which human civilizations depend are increasingly under threat, forcing contemporary societies to reckon with their societies' impacts on the Earth's biosphere. "Politics as usual" has become a recipe for ecological suicide. Building sustainable societies will be this generation's defining challenge. Students in this course will examine how political thinkers throughout history have characterized humanity's place in the natural world, and how those ideas shape political beliefs, institutions and practices today. They will apply theoretical techniques to design innovative solutions to pressing environmental problems and controversies, learning how to translate ideas into actions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Darrow
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387EV Advanced Topics in Politics: 'U.S. Environmental Politics and Policy'

Spring. Credits: 4

Environmental concerns are no longer a niche "special interest" in American politics. Today multiplying and intensifying ecological crises are getting harder to ignore, and the need for action is urgent. Deciding how to respond to and govern a climate-changed world is now one of the defining political challenges of our time. This course examines the history of environmental debates in the United States, the diverse range of actors and organizations participating in these debates, current laws and institutions regulating Americans' relationships with their environments at both the federal and state levels, and the processes for making and implementing public policy for the environment.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Darrow
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387PA Advanced Topics in Politics: 'The Politics of Authoritarianism'

Fall. Credits: 4

Authoritarianism, the most common form of government for much of history, is on the rise again today. Yet authoritarian states differ widely in their policies, institutions, and durability. How do we recognize whether a country is a dictatorship? When do dictators use repression, and why do they sometimes hold elections? When do dictatorships break down? How should all this influence our thinking about democracy? Drawing from examples around the world, we will analyze ways in which authoritarian governments exercise and maintain power, including issues relating to legislatures, clientelism, and patronage. We will also examine how authoritarianism impacts economic and foreign policy.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Mueller-Redwood
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387PD Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Other Political Dreams'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines dreams of other politics, trying to recognize what is distinctive in a diverse set of traditions beyond their resistance to liberal-democracy's entwinement with contemporary capitalism. Spanning anarchism, Afro-pessimism and Afro-futurism, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement, we will examine political actions and thought that do not identify themselves as democratic and even define themselves as anti-democratic in order to name politics they aspire towards. Special attention will be given the picture of collective belonging and action that emerges in these works along with the techniques of figuring these visions and of gathering community around them.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Aslam
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387PE Advanced Topics in Politics: 'The 1%'

Spring. Credits: 4

In recent years, scholarship on American politics has challenged the idea that our government has upheld and expanded basic democratic principles since the fall of Jim Crow. This scholarship notes a growing wealth gap since the 1970s and 1980s that has given rise to a "New Gilded Age." Along with this rising wealth gap, the United States has also endured rising incarceration rates, a shrinking middle class, an eroding public sphere, and charges that plutocracy -- or governance by the rich -- has overtaken American democracy. In this course we will explore, investigate, and challenge several arguments and assumptions at the heart of these critiques of contemporary US politics. Students will read and discuss cutting edge scholarship and journalism exploring the inequality debates, including inquiries into the complex interrelations of race, gender, and class.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Hilton
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics including POLIT-104.

POLIT-387PH Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Politics of Health'

Spring. Credits: 4

We center "health" as a critical concept in political theory and practice. "Health" has emerged as a social value of many Western democracies, especially with advancements in medical science, and often refers to a healthy society or debate. Health can be a moral good or a resource to pursue and receive state support for. But health can also be elusive for many people and its meaning can shift based on experience. Nevertheless, health can inform who we think of as a citizen, leader, parent, adult, or even person. We will examine the concept of "health" in all of these and other variants and its impact on democratic societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Daily
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387PT Advanced Topics in Politics: 'Planetary Politics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Climate change has turned the stability and functioning of Earth systems into an object of active political contestation raising questions about the future of the nation-state as the primary unit of international politics inaugurating an age of "planetary politics." The course will explore the meaning of "planetary politics" -- the politics of the planet Earth as a shared system -- from a variety of angles including climate change, nuclear catastrophe, pandemics, space warfare, and extra-planetary threats such as meteorites and extra-terrestrial contact. We will explore these topics through genres including theoretical, empirical, and fictional media to understand the future of politics.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Nakayama
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-387SP Advanced Topics in Political Theory: 'U.S. Foreign Policy in Space'

Fall. Credits: 4

Once the crown jewel of U.S. Cold War public diplomacy, NASA has fallen into decline due to faltering public interest and budget. At the same time, there has been a "space rush" as private corporations have sought to normalize civilian space travel. This seminar explores the dynamics of the United States' foreign policy in space -- how it was developed and with what effects. By engaging with archival materials and scholarship this course will answer the following questions (among others): Why hasn't space been weaponized? What role does technological prestige play in public diplomacy? What are the roots and future of the commercial space industry?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Nakayama
Prereq: 8 credits from Politics or International Relations.

POLIT-391 Pivotal Political Ideas

POLIT-391RE Pivotal Political Ideas: 'Reparations and the Politics of Repair'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine arguments for reparations for slavery with an eye towards understanding what withholding and extending reparations have meant for American democracy and citizenship. We will contextualize arguments for reparations within a larger conversation about repairing democratic norms, institutions, and social conditions within recent democratic theory. Together we will investigate what historical and ongoing injustices and inequalities reparations are meant to repair, how reparations would address those harms, and how arguments for reparations have mobilized social activists on both sides of the question. Our readings will span history, legal studies, politics, literature and the arts and arguments for reparations to be paid by the American state down to institutions such as corporations, universities, and other jurisdictions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Aslam
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics.

POLIT-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Courses Meeting Politics Subfield Requirements for the Major

American Politics

Politics
POLIT-104American Politics4
POLIT-234Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama4
POLIT-235Constitutional Law: The Federal System4
POLIT-236Civil Liberties4
POLIT-246American Political Thought4
POLIT-248PMTopics in Politics: 'Parties and Movements in American Politics'4
POLIT-252Urban Politics4
POLIT-278U.S. Elections4
POLIT-315The United States and the Promotion of Democracy and Human Rights4
POLIT-343Law and Religion4
POLIT-354Social Housing4
POLIT-355Race and Housing4
POLIT-377American Political Development4
POLIT-387EVAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'U.S. Environmental Politics and Policy'4
POLIT-387PEAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'The 1%'4

Comparative Politics

Politics
POLIT-106Comparative Politics4
POLIT-208Chinese Politics4
POLIT-209Contemporary Russian Politics4
POLIT-228East Asian Politics4
POLIT-230Resistance and Revolution4
POLIT-243Introduction to Latin American Politics4
POLIT-249African Politics4
POLIT-255PAGender and Power in Global Contexts: 'The Politics of Abortion in the Americas'4
POLIT-267The Politics of Finance and Financial Crises4
POLIT-269Social Movements: Theory and Praxis4
POLIT-300Democracy and Its Challengers: Populism, Nationalism, and Autocracy4
POLIT-314Political Violence: Causes and Solutions4
POLIT-323Comparative Politics of the Middle East4
POLIT-324Comparative Politics of N. Africa4
POLIT-327Transitional Justice4
POLIT-341Political Islam4
POLIT-343Law and Religion4
POLIT-350Revolutions4
POLIT-359Democratization and Civil Society in East Asia4
POLIT-363Political Economy of the European Union4
POLIT-387PAAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'The Politics of Authoritarianism'4
Russian & Eurasian Studies
RES-240Contemporary Russian Politics: From Lenin to Putin4

International Politics

Politics
POLIT-116World Politics4
POLIT-216Middle East Politics4
POLIT-224The United States and Iran4
POLIT-226The United States, Israel, and the Arabs4
POLIT-232Introduction to International Political Economy4
POLIT-247International Law and Organization4
POLIT-267The Politics of Finance and Financial Crises4
POLIT-270American Foreign Policy4
POLIT-305International Society4
POLIT-312Silk Roads: Ancient and Modern Highways across the Eurasian Continent4
POLIT-314Political Violence: Causes and Solutions4
POLIT-319War: What Is It Good For?4
POLIT-327Transitional Justice4
POLIT-333Just War and Jihad: Comparative Ethics of War and Peace4
POLIT-357War and Peace in South Asia4
POLIT-363Political Economy of the European Union4
POLIT-365Ethics and International Relations4
POLIT-366Global Migration4
POLIT-384Ending War and Securing the Peace: Conflict Mediation and Resolution in the 21st Century4
POLIT-385International Security4
POLIT-387CYAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Cyberpolitics'4
POLIT-387PTAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Planetary Politics'4
POLIT-387SPAdvanced Topics in Political Theory: 'U.S. Foreign Policy in Space'4
Russian & Eurasian Studies
RES-350Revolutions4

Political Theory

Gender Studies
GNDST-221QFFeminist and Queer Theory: 'Feminist and Queer Theory'4
Politics
POLIT-118Introduction to Political Ideas4
POLIT-212Modern Political Thought4
POLIT-233Introduction to Feminist Theory4
POLIT-246American Political Thought4
POLIT-248GRTopics in Politics: 'Grassroots Democracy'4
POLIT-248TETopics in Politics: 'Science, Technology and Public Policy'4
POLIT-305International Society4
POLIT-333Just War and Jihad: Comparative Ethics of War and Peace4
POLIT-342Islamic Political Thought4
POLIT-365Ethics and International Relations4
POLIT-383Art and Politics4
POLIT-387BWAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Black Women Activists'4
POLIT-387CPAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Agency, Solidarity, and Action: Theories of Coalitional Politics'4
POLIT-387EPAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Environmental Political Thought'4
POLIT-387PDAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Other Political Dreams'4
POLIT-387PHAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Politics of Health'4
POLIT-391REPivotal Political Ideas: 'Reparations and the Politics of Repair'4