Psychology and Education

Katherine Binder, Chair

Sandra M. Lawrence, Director, Secondary/Middle Teacher Licensure Program

Sarah Frenette, Interim Director, Early Childhood/Elementary Teacher Licensure Program and Five College Teacher Licensure Coordinator

Cheryl McGraw, Academic Department Coordinator


303 Reese Psychology and Education Building
413-538-2338
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/psychology/psyched

Overview and Contact Information

The Psychology and Education department offers two options within the Psychology and Education major and a minor in Education. Within the major, Option I requires a minimum of 60 credits and leads toward teacher licensure in early childhood education (PreK–2) or elementary education (1–6); Option II requires a minimum of 48 credits and does not lead toward licensure. No major is offered in education alone. The minor in education (with teacher licensure) provides students with another route to completing the course work necessary for applying to Mount Holyoke’s teacher licensure programs.

Students considering pursuing teacher licensure while an undergraduate at Mount Holyoke must contact the Five College Teacher Licensure Coordinator for an appointment (preferably by the middle of the sophomore year), to review their options, the licensure requirements, and application procedures for acceptance into the licensure program of their choice. Candidates for all Mount Holyoke’s teacher education programs must complete a sequence of courses in the Psychology and Education Department prior to the spring semester of their senior year. The spring semester of the senior year is devoted almost entirely to the practicum, which is a full-time student teaching assignment in an area school.

Several options are available to complete the teacher licensure course sequence in relation to a student's major or minor:

  • Students who wish to work towards an early childhood or elementary license have a choice of majors. Students can major in psychology and education or, with careful selection of courses, any liberal arts major which the College offers. The latter often elect to complete the education minor, as the minor in education (with teacher licensure) provides students with the course work necessary for applying to Mount Holyoke’s teacher licensure programs.
  • Students pursuing a license in middle or secondary school subjects, or certification in the arts typically major in that subject area, with careful selection of courses to meet all licensure requirements.

More information is available within teacher licensure. Students are also encouraged to contact the teacher licensure website and the Teacher Licensure Coordinator for further information.

For those who have already completed a bachelor's degree, the Master of Arts in Teaching program, through the Professional and Graduate Education division, offers an alternative route towards licensure.

See Also

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Department of Psychology and Education:

Sandra Lawrence, Professor of Psychology and Education

Becky Packard, Professor of Psychology and Education; Director of the Weissman Center

Jennifer Jacoby, Assistant Professor of Education

Lenore Reilly, Assistant Professor of Education; Senior Advisor to the President/Secretary of the Board of Trustees

Jennifer Daigle-Matos, Visiting Lecturer in Psychology & Education

Amy Grillo, Visiting Lecturer in Psychology & Education

Michael Flynn, Visiting Instructor in Psychology & Education

Requirements for the Major in Psychology and Education

Two options are offered within the psychology and education major:

  • Option I: requires a minimum of 60 credits and leads toward teacher licensure in early childhood education (PreK–2) or elementary education (1–6)
  • Option II: requires a minimum of 44 credits and does not lead toward licensure

Option I: Leading to Teacher Licensure in Early Childhood or Elementary Education

A minimum of 60 credits (including the student teaching practicum in the senior year):

A 100-level psychology course4
PSYCH-201Statistics 4
PSYCH-200Research Methods in Psychology 4
PSYCH-230Developmental Psychology 4
PSYCH-233Educational Psychology 4
A choice of either:4
Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society
Foundations of Multicultural Education
EDUC-263Teaching English Language Learners 4
One course at the 200 or 300 level in Area D (perception, cognition, and language) or Area E (biological bases of behavior) of the psychology curriculum4
At least one course at the 200 or 300 level in psychology in Area A (social psychology) or Area B (personality and abnormal psychology) or Areas D or E (whichever area was not selected to complete the Area D or E requirement above)4
One Psychology laboratory at the 300 level, if not completed in meeting the Area requirements above 1,20-4
EDUC-300The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Literacy in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools 4
EDUC-320Observing and Assisting in Inclusive Classrooms (junior or senior year)2
EDUC-325The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Math/Science/Technology Instruction and Curriculum 4
EDUC-322Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood and Elementary Education 4
EDUC-323Student Teaching in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools 10
Total Credits60-64
1

All lab courses have the word "Lab" or "Laboratory" as the first word of the course title. 

2

 EDUC-395 for lab credit may be substituted for the 300-level Psychology lab. If choosing the EDUC-395 for lab credit option, the project must include analysis of data (e.g., quantitative, qualitative, archival, biographical), using any empirical method (e.g., experiment, case study, interview) and must be presented orally to the department at the end of the semester. This option requires a minimum of 4 credits of EDUC-395.

Other Requirements

  • Distribution/General Education Courses. In addition, applicants for the elementary license (1–6) should plan their distribution courses so that they will fulfill general education requirements in math, humanities, and social sciences consistent with field of knowledge requirements designated by the Massachusetts State Department of Elementary and Secondary Education as appropriate for the elementary license. See the appropriate program director or the teacher licensure coordinator for assistance in selecting this course work.
  • Lab in Early Social and Personality Development. Applicants for the early childhood license (PreK-2) must enroll in PSYCH-331. This course can be used to fulfill the requirement for a Psychology lab at the 300 level.

Additional Specifications

  • Students who pursue this interdisciplinary major automatically fulfill the College’s “outside the major” requirement.

Option II: Not Leading to Teacher Licensure

A minimum of 44 credits:

A 100-level psychology course4
PSYCH-201Statistics 4
PSYCH-200Research Methods in Psychology 4
PSYCH-230Developmental Psychology 4
PSYCH-233Educational Psychology 4
A choice of either:4
Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society
Foundations of Multicultural Education
One additional course at the 200 or 300 level in Area D (perception, cognition, and language) or Area E (biological bases of behavior) of the psychology curriculum4
At least one course at the 200 or 300 level in psychology in Area A (social psychology) or Area B (personality and abnormal psychology) or Areas D or E (whichever area was not selected to complete the Area D or E requirement above)4
One Psychology laboratory course at the 300 level 1, 24
8 additional credits in psychology above the 100 level. These credits must be at the 300 level, unless 12 other 300-level credits were completed in meeting Area requirements 38
Total Credits44
1

 All lab courses have the word "Lab" or "Laboratory" as the first word of the course title.

2

If choosing EDUC-395 for lab credit, the project must include analysis of data (e.g. quantitative, qualitative, biographical), using any empirical method (e.g. experiment, case study, interview) and must be presented orally to the department at the end of the semester.  This option requires a minimum of 4 credits of EDUC-395.

3

300-level courses can be completed outside the psychology and education department if they are in a related field.

Additional Specifications

  • Students who pursue this interdisciplinary major automatically fulfill the College’s “outside the major” requirement.

Requirements for the Minor in Education

The minor in education (with teacher licensure) provides students with the course work necessary for applying to Mount Holyoke’s teacher licensure programs. Further information about teacher licensure programs and procedures for admittance into one of the programs is found within Teacher Licensure.

Students who elect the interdisciplinary major in psychology and education (Option I) complete the same course sequence requirements as the education minor, but through completion of the psychology and education major.

Other students may elect the education minor, whose course sequence depends on the student's academic plans.

Requirements for the Education Minor Specific to the Early Childhood and Elementary Teaching License With a Major in Any Discipline Other than Psychology and Education

For students pursuing early childhood or elementary licensure with a major in any discipline other than psychology and education the requirements are:

A minimum of 44 credits:

PSYCH-230Developmental Psychology 4
PSYCH-233Educational Psychology 4
EDUC-205Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society 4
or EDUC-220 Foundations of Multicultural Education
EDUC-263Teaching English Language Learners 4
EDUC-300The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Literacy in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools 4
EDUC-320Observing and Assisting in Inclusive Classrooms 2
EDUC-325The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Math/Science/Technology Instruction and Curriculum 4
EDUC-322Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood and Elementary Education 4
EDUC-323Student Teaching in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools 10
An additional course as required for your level:4
EDUST-265 is required for elementary applicants 1
PSYCH-331 for early childhood (PreK–2) applicants
Total Credits44
1

 A course in children's literature for educators is highly recommended for early childhood applicants

Required Courses for the Education Minor Specific to Teaching Licenses in Middle or Secondary Education, Foreign Language, Dance, Music, Theatre, or Visual Art

Students pursuing middle or secondary (as well as foreign language, dance, music, theatre, or visual art) licensure must take a minimum of 40 credits:

PSYCH-230Developmental Psychology 4
PSYCH-233Educational Psychology 4
EDUC-205Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society 4
or EDUC-220 Foundations of Multicultural Education
EDUC-263Teaching English Language Learners 4
EDUC-320Observing and Assisting in Inclusive Classrooms 2
EDUC-330The Process of Teaching and Learning in Secondary and Middle Schools 4
EDUC-331Student Teaching in Secondary and Middle Schools 10
EDUC-333Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Middle and Secondary Education 4
A subject-specific methods of teaching course at one of the Five Colleges4
Total Credits40

Additional Specifications

  • A course in differences in learning is highly recommended.

Teacher Licensure Programs

Information about the teacher licensure programs at the baccalaureate level, procedures for admittance into one of the programs, and the requirements for course work follow.

Currently, Mount Holyoke College is approved by the state of Massachusetts to offer “initial” licensure programs at the baccalaureate level in the following areas:

Early childhood education (PreK–2)
Elementary education (1–6)
Teacher of middle school (5-8) in English, history, biology, earth science, political science/political philosophy, and mathematics
Teacher of secondary school (8-12) in English, history, biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, political science/political philosophy, and mathematics
Teacher of foreign language (5-12) in Spanish, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Latin & classical humanities
Teacher of dance (all levels)
Teacher of music (all levels)
Teacher of theater (all levels)
Teacher of visual art (PreK–8) and (5–12)

At the graduate level, the College also admits qualified students who have completed their bachelor of arts degrees, to study for the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. The Master of Arts in Teaching program is offered through the division of Professional and Graduate Education.

Procedures and Policies for Teacher Licensure

Procedures

Students who wish to pursue teacher licensure at Mount Holyoke must complete the following:

  1. attend an initial advising session with Sarah Frenette, Five College Teacher Licensure Coordinator and interim director of the Early Childhood/Elementary Teacher Licensure Program, by the middle of the sophomore year in order to identify course work in the major and in the arts and sciences necessary for licensure,
  2. enroll in a sequence of courses in the psychology and education department constituting the education minor or built into Option I within the psychology and education major,
  3. attend follow-up advising sessions with Sarah Frenette (early childhood or elementary) or Sandra Lawrence (middle and secondary, foreign language, dance, music, theatre, and visual art programs) as well as advisors in the major to assist with course selection necessary for teacher licensure, and,
  4. complete the application process for the practicum year.

Part of the application process includes passing all components of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) before the spring practicum.

Relationship of the Licensure Course Sequence to the Student's Major

Students pursuing a license in middle or secondary school subjects, or certification in the arts typically major in that subject area, with careful of selection of courses to meet all licensure requirements.

Students who wish to work towards an early childhood or elementary license have a choice of majors. Students can major in psychology and education or, with careful selection of courses, any liberal arts major which the College offers. The latter often elect to complete the education minor, as the minor in education (with teacher licensure) provides students with the course work necessary for applying to Mount Holyoke’s teacher licensure programs.

Specific advice to students pursuing licensure in specific areas of study can be found with other information about that area of study.

Application to the Practicum Semester

Candidates for teacher licensure at all levels must apply to participate in the practicum semester between December 1 and January 7 of their junior year. In addition to completing an application form and having an interview with the program director, students must submit a resume, transcript, a copy of their current degree audit, evidence of passing the appropriate components of the MTEL for the license sought, two faculty recommendations, and a written essay. The transcript must reflect a cumulative GPA of 2.85 or higher. Following completion of prerequisite courses offered in their chosen major and in the Department of Psychology and Education and acceptance into the practicum semester, students are eligible to enroll in a student teaching practicum offered in the spring semester of their senior year.

Teacher Incentive Semester (TIS)

The Teacher Incentive Semester provides an opportunity for those students who wish to pursue a teaching license but were unable to complete their final teacher licensure program requirements within the usual number of semesters expected for the bachelor’s degree. The Teacher Incentive Semester is offered in the spring semester only and consists of the practicum course and the practicum seminar. To be eligible for TIS, the student must both, before the TIS semester:

  1. have completed all graduation requirements including those of the major, minor, College distributions, and 128 credits;
  2. have exceeded the funding limitation standards of the College (i.e., at least eight semesters for first-year fall entrants or seven semesters for first-year spring entrants. Transfer and Frances Perkins students should consult with Student Financial Services to determine the applicable limitation standard.).

Courses of study as well as procedures for application to a specific teacher licensure program and practicum are the same as those for students who complete the practicum without TIS eligibility. (See “Application to the Practicum Semester” above.) Students accepted into a teacher licensure program and TIS will be charged one credit for the TIS semester.

There is no financial aid eligibility during the TIS semester.

Obtaining a Teaching License from the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

To become eligible for licensure in the state of Massachusetts through Mount Holyoke’s curriculum, graduates must:

  1. successfully complete the requirements of a Mount Holyoke teacher licensure program,
  2. pass all the appropriate components of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), and
  3. submit licensure application materials and fees to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Once candidates obtain licensure in Massachusetts, they are eligible for licensure in many other states through reciprocity agreements arranged by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Course Offerings

EDUC-205 Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

When do we bring up race and racism in a classroom? What do teachers need to interrupt racism and other types of oppression? How do societal issues affect schools and communities? This course examines the historical, social, and legal underpinnings of social constructions and how perspectives on race have influenced lives within school communities. Topics included will be white privilege and accountability, achievement and opportunity gaps, and the impact of antiracist pedagogies on multiple levels. Intersectionality of race and other identities will also be addressed. Essays, response papers, field experiences, and final project are required.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Daigle-Matos
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: Prepracticum required.

EDUC-220 Foundations of Multicultural Education

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers a study of the historical, theoretical, and philosophical perspectives that are the underpinnings of multiculturalism in education. Through selected readings, class discussion, and oral presentations, the course will examine the epistemological elements of race, class, culture, and gender in the classroom.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: a 100-level course in psychology.

EDUC-233 Educational Psychology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

What do we learn? How do we learn? Why do we learn? In this course, we will study issues of learning, teaching, and motivation that are central to educational psychology. We will explore the shifting paradigms within educational psychology, multiple subject matter areas, (dis)continuities between classroom and home cultures, students' prior experiences, teachers as learners, ethnic and gender identity in the classroom, and learning in out-of-school settings. Requires a prepracticum in a community-based setting.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-233
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
A. Grillo
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: Prepracticum required. Many of the available placements for this course are in after-school settings (one afternoon per week)

EDUC-258 Developing Mathematical Ideas K-8

Instructor permission required.

EDUC-263 Teaching English Language Learners

Fall. Credits: 4

This course addresses core competencies outlined in the Massachusetts Department of Education's English Language Learner certificate requirement. Readings in language acquisition theory, language learning and teaching, effective lesson design and assessment, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol, and knowledge of intercultural learners are covered. Students will have experience developing and adapting lessons and curriculum to address the needs of students in their pre-practicum settings.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
J. Jacoby
Advisory: Permission of instructor. Preference is given to students enrolled in the teacher licensure program

EDUC-267 Children's Literature for Educators

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces various genres of children's literature, including literature for adolescents; explores equity and social justice issues; and examines approaches to using literature in the preK-12 curriculum with an emphasis on social-emotional learning and making literature accessible to all learners. Students will read a variety of texts across genres and discuss ways to integrate literature into curriculum and learning as they expand their knowledge and appreciation of children's literature. Literature will be examined from multiple perspectives.

Crosslisted as: X.EDUC-465
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
C. Swift
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Only available to undergraduates who have been accepted into the teacher licensure track in the Psychology and Education Department.

EDUC-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EDUC-300 The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Literacy in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools

Spring. Credits: 4

Through a balanced and integrated approach students will learn to develop literacy in early childhood/elementary schools. Class members will learn about emergent literacy, diagnosing language needs, integrating phonics skills in a literature-based program, the teaching of process writing, children's fiction and nonfiction literature, and the use of portfolios for assessment. Course required for spring semester practicum students. Course evaluation is based on written and oral work done individually and in groups. Requires a prepracticum.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Jacoby
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Limited to students accepted to the practicum year program
Notes: Prepracticum required.

EDUC-320 Observing and Assisting in Inclusive Classrooms

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Students are expected to complete a supervised field experience full-time every day during January Intersession in an inclusive classroom in a school setting. Placements can be located within or outside of the Five College area. In addition to the field experience component, students attend three course meetings (detailed below). Reading and writing assignments focus on a survey of learning disabilities, descriptions of special education programs, understanding Individuals with Disabilities Education Act policies and placement options, interpreting Individualized Education Program plans, and planning curriculum for inclusive classrooms.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: One of the following: PSYCH-230, PSYCH-233, EDUC-205, or EDUST-215.
Advisory: Permission to participate in prepracticum experience for credit is contingent upon attendance at the meetings in November. Consult Ms. Frenette in October for exact dates of the November course meetings.
Notes: This course is required of all students pursuing teacher licensure. Graded on a credit/no credit basis. Three mandatory meetings (2 hours each): two in November and one in Feb. Prepracticum: five days a week for three weeks in January.

EDUC-322 Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood and Elementary Education

Spring. Credits: 4

This weekly seminar provides students with opportunities to examine curriculum development models, develop an integrated curriculum unit utilizing state and national content area standards, review researched based models of classroom management, and engage in dialogue with practicing teachers regarding numerous aspects of teaching and student learning. Additional topics covered include the arts in education, physical education, legal obligations of teachers, and home-school communication. As is the case in all pre-licensure programs, there is continued emphasis on addressing the needs of students with disabilities and English Language Learners.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Limited to students accepted into the practicum year program

EDUC-323 Student Teaching in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools

Spring. Credits: 10

Students participate in full-time student teaching in early childhood and elementary classrooms for 12 weeks. During this semester-long field-based placement, students hone classroom management skills, implement an extended integrated curriculum unit, deliver lessons in all content areas, and develop a wide range of assessment skills. The practicum culminates in two weeks of Lead Teaching, during which the student is responsible for managing all aspects of the classroom program. Students work with classroom teachers and college supervisors to address Professional Teaching Standards as required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Pre-service Performance Assessment Program.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Frenette
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EDUC-300, EDUC-320, and EDUC-325.
Notes: 5 days a week for 12 weeks full-time student teaching in school site (includes Mount Holyoke College's spring break); limited to students accepted to the practicum year program.

EDUC-324 Observing and Assisting in Early Childhood and Elementary Settings

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 2

Discussions and fieldwork provide the student with an opportunity to understand the classroom as a learning community. The tutorial includes several meetings focusing on the student's participant observations and assigned readings. Fieldwork includes a minimum of 20 hours on site, individually scheduled in early childhood (pre K-2) or elementary (1-6) settings. Assessment includes in-progress reports and a final project related to fieldwork. Course graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Notes: 1 credit (20 hours of prepracticum); 2 credits (40 hours or more of prepracticum).

EDUC-325 The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Math/Science/Technology Instruction and Curriculum

Fall. Credits: 4

Students will learn about inquiry-based science/math curriculum and use of technology in PreK-6 classroom. They will construct more extensive understandings of science/math instruction by developing lessons that implement the Massachusetts Frameworks incorporating the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. They will teach a minimum of three lessons to students in their pre-practicum setting. Emphasis will be on learning diverse management and instructional practices, such as the use of manipulatives, problem solving, cooperative learning, and project-based learning. Students will also become more adept at developing effective approaches to using assessment to guide instruction.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
M. Flynn
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Pre-practicum required. Limited to students accepted in the practicum year program.
Notes: Pre-practicum required

EDUC-330 The Process of Teaching and Learning in Secondary and Middle Schools

Fall. Credits: 4

This course addresses the question: what does teaching for understanding look like, and how can we plan for it? Informed by current research and effective teaching practice, students learn to plan and implement curricular units and lessons that engage adolescents, strengthen their literacy skills, and further their understanding of content. Topics include establishing a supportive classroom environment, designing equitable learning situations for students from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds as well as students with special needs, using digital media to enhance learning, and examining the connections between pedagogy and classroom management.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
S. Lawrence
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Students wishing to gain experience for Teach for America (and other teacher residency programs), the Fulbright Scholars program, Science Buddies, etc. may enroll with permission of instructor.
Notes: Requires a field-experience in an educational setting. Required for all teacher candidates accepted into the middle and secondary teacher licensure programs.

EDUC-331 Student Teaching in Secondary and Middle Schools

Spring. Credits: 10

Students participate in full-time student teaching in middle or secondary classrooms for 12 weeks. During this semester-long field-based placement, students hone classroom management skills, design and implement curriculum, and develop a wide range of assessment skills. Students work with classroom teachers and college supervisors to address Professional Teaching Standards as required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Pre-service Performance Assessment Program

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Lawrence
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EDUC-320 and EDUC-330.
Notes: 5 days a week for 12 weeks; full-time student teaching in school sites (includes Mount Holyoke College's/Amherst College's spring break); students must apply for and be accepted into the practicum semester a year prior to the practicum.

EDUC-332 Observing and Assisting in Secondary and Middle School Educational Programs

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 2

This is a fieldwork-based independent study course. During the fall and spring semesters it involves 20 to 40 hours of individually scheduled fieldwork in a secondary or middle-school classroom or educational program. Students keep a reflective journal, read relevant articles and essays, meet regularly with the instructor, and write a final report.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
S. Lawrence
Instructor permission required.
Notes: This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis.

EDUC-333 Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Middle and Secondary Education

Spring. Credits: 4

This weekly seminar provides students with opportunities to design and discuss case studies involving adolescents in middle and secondary school settings, review researched-based models of instruction, and classroom management, and engage in dialogue with professionals regarding numerous aspects of teaching and student learning. Additional topics covered include reviewing the legal obligations of teachers, addressing the needs of students with disabilities, English language learners, and developing effective communication between home and school.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Lawrence
Instructor permission required.

EDUC-351 Topics in Education

EDUC-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.