Africana Studies

Lucas Wilson, Chair

Holly Sharac, Academic Department Coordinator


312 Skinner Hall
413-538-2377
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/africanamerican

Overview and Contact Information

As a field of inquiry, Africana studies, describes and analyzes the origins and experiences of people of African descent wherever they live or have lived. This field is informed by the intellectual traditions of African American, African, and African Diasporic studies. While it has a renewed focus on the connections and movements of African-descended people from different sites of Africa and the diaspora, it also values in depth study of black people in discrete local, regional and national contexts. This field is inherently comparative, international, and interdisciplinary in approach, embracing the range of fields in the humanities and social sciences and including the performing arts.

The major prepares students for a number of careers: government, politics, international affairs, law, education, journalism, public health, religious studies, literature and the arts, and business management, to name only a few.

See Also

Faculty

This area of study is administered by the Africana Studies Committee:

Satyananda Gabriel, Professor of Economics

Samba Gadjigo, Professor of French

Holly Hanson, Professor of History, Teaching Spring Only

Dorothy Knight-Mosby, Professor of Spanish; Associate Dean of Faculty

Lynda Morgan, Professor of History

Olabode Omojola, Five College Professor of Music

Preston Smith II, Professor of Politics, Teaching Spring Only

Donald Weber, Lucia, Ruth and Elizabeth MacGregor Professor of English

Patricia Banks, Associate Professor of Sociology

Amber Douglas, Associate Professor of Psychology and Education; Director of Student Success Initiatives

Lucas Wilson, Associate Professor of Africana Studies and Economics

Kimberly Brown, Assistant Professor of English and Africana Studies

Bernard Forjwuor, Mount Holyoke Fellow; Visiting Lecturer of Politics

Requirements for the Major

A minimum of 40 credits:

AFCNA-200Foundations of Africana Studies 4
CBL requirement: Select at least one of the following courses:4
Black Migrations
Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society
History of Global Inequality
Education and Development in Africa: History and Ethnographic Research Methods
Women in History: 'African Women: Food and Power'
At least 16 credits at the 300 level, in at least two different disciplines, of which only 4 credits may be AFCNA-395 116
Additional courses in Africana Studies 116
Total Credits40
1

Courses to be counted for the major are drawn from departmental offerings with the approval of the program. Students may also count courses taken at the other Five College institutions, subject to approval by the chair.

Other Requirements

  • Concentration statement. Students who major in Africana studies will construct their own concentrations with the guidance and advice of a faculty advisor who is affiliated with the program. The concentration statement must be approved by the program. The concentration statement will include a description of the concentration, which disciplines it draws on, a discussion of its intellectual merits and an explanation by the student why she has constructed her concentration in the particular ways she has. The student needs to list courses pertinent to her concentration, as well as any relevant experiential learning opportunities including Community-Based Learning (CBL) classes, community service, and internships.

Additional Specifications

  • When declaring a major, each student chooses an advisor from the committee. In addition, she must have the approval of the program chair.

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 20 credits:

AFCNA-200Foundations of Africana Studies 4
12 credits credits at the 200 level or higher12
4 credits at the 300 level 14
Total Credits20
1

AFCNA-395 may not be counted towards the minimum 4 credits at the 300 level.

Course Offerings

AFCNA-200 Foundations of Africana Studies

Spring. Credits: 4

This reading- and writing-intensive course draws upon the intellectual traditions of African American, African, and African diasporic studies in order to explore the connections and disjunctures among people of African descent. While the course pays attention to national, regional, and historical contexts, it asks this question: what do African descended people have in common and when and how are their experiences and interests different?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Wilson

AFCNA-206 African Cities: Development Dreams and Nightmares in the Twentieth Century

Spring. Credits: 4

African cities demonstrate the failure of models of development with the aim and ideal of industrialization. This course examines the empty promises of modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film, and city archives. Beginning with Timbuktu and Cairo, the course explores the emergence and decline of trade entrepots, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and polities. Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, Kampala, Kinshasa, Harare, Johannesburg, Lagos, Accra, and Dakar are among the cities studied. Designed for those seeking only an introduction to development as well as those with further ambitions, it assumes no previous knowledge of Africa.

Crosslisted as: HIST-206
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Hanson

AFCNA-208 Introduction to Twentieth-Century Critical Race Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the discursive relationship between race and law in contemporary U.S. society. Readings examine the ways in which racial bodies are constituted in the cultural and political economy of American society. The main objective is to explore the rules and social practices that govern the relationship of race to gender, nationality, sexuality, and class in U.S. courts and other cultural institutions. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Kimberle Crenshaw, Derrick Bell, and Richard Delgado, among others.

Crosslisted as: CST-253
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Critical Social Thought 248, 249,or 250 recommended but not required

AFCNA-234 Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama

Spring. Credits: 4

Black Metropolis" refers to the more than half a million black people jammed into a South Side ghetto in Chicago at mid-twentieth century that featured an entrenched black political machine, a prosperous black middle class, and a thriving black cultural scene in the midst of massive poverty and systemic inequality. This course will follow the political, economic, and cultural developments of what scholars considered to be the typical urban community in postwar United States. We will examine such topics as Martin Luther King's failed desegregation campaign; Harold Washington, first black mayor; William Julius Wilson's urban underclass thesis; and the rise of Barack Obama.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-234
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
P. Smith

AFCNA-238 Black Political Thought

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will focus on the writings of Black political thinkers in the Americas, Africa and Europe. Through critical examination of the conditions against, and contexts within, which the discourses of these thinkers are situated, this course hopes to arrive at some understanding of the principles, goals and strategies developed to contest and redefine the notions of citizenship (vis-a-vis the imperatives of race/racism and the global colonial formation), humanity, development, democracy, and freedom.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-238
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Forjwuor

AFCNA-241 Topics in Africana Studies

AFCNA-241AF Topics in Africana Studies: 'Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility'

Spring. Credits: 4

Exploration of the history of Afro-Latin American populations since Independence within and outside the nation-state. We will question why and how to study those whose governments define them not as peoples of African descent but as part of a mixed-race majority of Hispanic cultural heritage, who themselves may often have supported this policy, and who may have had compelling reasons to avoid official scrutiny. Readings include early twentieth-century Latin American racialist theorizing; research using census, economic, criminal, and marriage records; autobiographical works, and analysis of race in textual and musical representations of peoples, regions, and nations.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-260, HIST-287AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

AFCNA-241CV Topics in Africana Studies: 'The Culture of Civil Rights'

Spring. Credits: 4

Students will examine the cultural history of African American political resistance from the early to middle twentieth century. We will study the various art forms that people of African descent have employed to assert their humanity, preserve their identity, and critique oppression of race, class, gender, and sexuality. Fiction, poetry, film, music, theater, memoir, aesthetics, and athletics are the creative devices that we will explore. We will mine the complex cultures of the seminal places and organizations recognized as having played crucial roles in the long black freedom struggle. We will also probe the political contributions and legacies of leading African American cultural figures.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Brown

AFCNA-241FW Topics in Africana Studies: 'African American Women and United States History'

Spring. Credits: 4

How is our understanding of U.S. history transformed when we place African American women at the center of the story? This course will examine the exclusion of African American women from dominant historical narratives and the challenge to those narratives presented by African American women's history through an investigation of selected topics in the field.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-206FW, HIST-280AA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Renda

AFCNA-241HS Topics in Africana Studies: 'African American History, Precolonial to Emancipation'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the cultural, social, political, and economic history of African Americans through the Civil War. Topics covered include the African background to the African American experience, the Atlantic slave trade, introduction and development of slavery, master-slave relationships, the establishment of black communities, slave revolts, the political economy of slavery, women in slavery, the experiences of free blacks, the crisis of the nineteenth century, and the effect of the Civil War.

Crosslisted as: HIST-281
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

AFCNA-251 Contemporary African American Literature II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine African American literature and culture in the postwar period as American identities are coalescing around the concept of the US as a world power. Specifically, our task during the semester will be to discuss the myriad ways black authors and artists attempt to interrogate the structure of racial hegemony by creating poetry and prose meant to expand notions of culture and form. We will also examine music, visual art, and advertisements from this era to have a greater sense of the black experience through various cultural representations. Writers will include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Michael S. Harper and bell hooks.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-251
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. Brown

AFCNA-282 African American History from Emancipation to Obama

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the social, cultural, political, and economic history of African Americans from emancipation and Reconstruction through the present. Emphasis will fall on postwar southern social and economic developments, the rise of segregation, northern migrations, black class stratification, nationalism, the twentieth-century civil rights movement, and current trends in African American political, social, and economic life.

Crosslisted as: HIST-282
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

AFCNA-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

AFCNA-301 The Abolition Movement

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the maturation of North American slave regimes after the American Revolution and the diverse activities of people who worked to abolish slavery. The assorted motives of white opponents of slavery and the actions of both free and enslaved African Americans to achieve freedom will be highlighted. We will analyze the mechanics of biracial coalition building and assess the historical legacy of these activists for subsequent social movements.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301AB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

AFCNA-302 Urban Policy

Spring. Credits: 4

Gentrification, unemployment, crime, failing schools, disinvestment, mass incarceration--what comes to mind when you think of the inner city? In response to a constrained fiscal environment, cities have increasingly adopted neoliberal policy approaches to address seemingly intractable urban problems. The seminar will study current research to assess the political and economic impact of this neoliberal policy regime on housing, education, and public safety.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-302
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
P. Smith
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

AFCNA-308 Luminous Darkness: African American Social Thought After DuBois

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Examines the causes of and proposed solutions to 'the Negro problem' in post-Civil War American public policy. Focuses on the life, work, and legacies of DuBois. Drawing on domestic and diasporic fictional and nonfictional depictions of black life in the 'DuBoisian century' the course considers different responses to his 1903 question, 'How does it feel to be a problem?' Examining theories, arguments, movements and policies targeting blacks and their environment allows us to criticize black modernity, assess the changing role of black intellectuals in society, evaluate 'race theory' and consider dominant and marginal attempts to analyze and overcome the 'color line' in America.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Africana Studies.

AFCNA-321 Politics of Decolonization

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar is a critical exploration of the various processes, accounts and theories of colonialism and decolonization in Africa and the Americas. The aim is to chart alternative paths to rethinking the meaning and impact of these terms. Focusing on the various colonial/imperial tools employed to subjugate, exploit and dominate colonized subjects, we will examine how liberal discourses/structures that are assumed to embody the terms of freedom and sovereignty have now become extensions of the colonial they were initially employed to overcome. The main objective of this course is to explore various approaches to redefining decolonization, noting the changing meaning of colonialism.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-321
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Forjwuor

AFCNA-339 The Visual Culture of Protest

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines social protests from the perspective of the visual. Examining cultural productions from 1948-2015 we will focus on the geographical specificity of planned and spontaneous protests that have mobilized people into action. We will use a black studies framework to engage the possibilities present in resisting disparate power structures of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region. Artists, musicians, activists, writers, and grassroots organizers of social movements have been ever cognizant of the role of the visual in subverting power structures. We will use this opportunity to place visual culture at the center of a conversation concerning resistance, human rights, political agency, citizenship, and freedom.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-339, CST-339
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-199/ENGL-200 or AFCNA-200.

AFCNA-341 Topics in Africana Studies

AFCNA-341NE Topics in Africana Studies: 'Imperial Neoliberalism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a critical exercise taught at the intersection of two seemingly incommensurable terms, imperialism and neoliberalism. Charting the genealogies of these terms, we will explore the lines of entanglements that hold these two concepts together as mutually reinforcing projects. In part the course will address how self-governance and self-determination under liberal democratic regimes work to accomplish the neoliberal objectives, hence curtailing the legitimacy of the sovereign will as an essential democratic value. This course will also focus on ways neoliberal mandates legitimize the expansion of imperial extractive capacity beyond what physical territorial aggrandizement limited.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-307, CST-349NE
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
B. Forjwuor
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in politics.

AFCNA-341PW Topics in Africana Studies: 'Power and Exchange in the African Past'

Spring. Credits: 4

Did African nations become poorer in the 20th century because development initiatives were badly executed? inherently exploitative? ill-timed? Looking beyond the caricatures of evil colonial officers, lazy peasants, or greedy elites, who do we see engaged in productive activity and what are they doing? What concepts and categories illumine our understanding of their actions? How does a careful exploration of the nature of exchange and production in Africa revise our perception of the global economy in the present? We will explore three centuries of exchange in Africa and elsewhere: students may focus their research on the history of a market in any part of the world.

Crosslisted as: HIST-341PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Hanson
Prereq: 8 credits of history or other significant preparatory coursework relevant to the topic.

AFCNA-341SP Topics in Africana Studies: 'African Americans and Sports'

Spring. Credits: 4

Students will explore the critical role that athletics and black sports figures have played in debates about racial uplift, citizenship, civil rights, gender norms, and sexuality from the late nineteenth century through the present. Our task will be to examine amateur, collegiate, and professional sports as sites where social markers of race, class, gender, and sexuality have been constructed. The class will investigate the black experience in sports for its intrinsic connections to the history of advancement, exclusion, and identity formation for people of African descent in the United States.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Brown
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

AFCNA-341TM Topics in Africana Studies: 'Toni Morrison'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the work and the centralized black world of the last American Nobel laureate in literature, Toni Morrison. Morrison is the author of eleven novels and multiple other works, including nonfiction and criticism. In a career that has spanned over forty years and has informed countless artists and writers, Morrison's expansive cultural reach can hardly be measured accurately. In this course we will endeavor to critically analyze the arc and the import of many of Morrison's writings. Readings include: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Jazz, Playing in the Dark, Paradise, and A Mercy.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-350TM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.

AFCNA-351 Sex, Race, and the Visual

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines categories of race, gender, sex, and sexuality through the lens of the visual. Using contemporary literature, photography, performance art, film, and theories of the visual, our task is to investigate the import and utility of embodiment. How do race, gender, and sexuality function in the artistic imaginary? What can we glean from cultural productions that engage the viewer/reader in ways that challenge ideas about conformity, fluidity, belonging, and self-reflection? More than a linear literary or theoretical trajectory, this course will provide a template for all the mechanisms of the visual -- psychological and ocular, interpretive, rhetorical and performative.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-351
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-200.

AFCNA-356 Black Migrations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar is a comparative examination of the migration of African-descended people within and to the United States. It looks at in succession the original African diaspora through the Atlantic slave trade; the Great Migration of African Americans from the South; the immigration to the U.S. of African-descended people from the West Indies; and last, the movement of Africans from the continent to the United States since 1965 when immigration laws became more inclusive. We will evaluate the process of African Americanization for each new migratory group in all of its cultural and political ramifications. Course material includes articles, books, films, novels, and guest speakers.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-356
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
P. Smith
Prereq: AFCNA-200 or POLIT-200.

AFCNA-369 Black Radicalism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The struggles and ideas of transatlantic black radicals have changed the ways we think and study--through the formation of Africana/African-American/Black-Studies--and the ways in which we express thoughts and ideas--through culture and politics. In this seminar, we will study the interdisciplinary history of black radicalism in the 20th century--in the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa. This interdisciplinary history is animated by a central debate over the role of black internationalism, if any, in domestic black radical thought and action, in the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-369
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
P. Smith
Prereq: AFCNA-200 or POLIT-200.
Notes: There will be a number of shared classes/discussions with the Africana Studies Senior Seminar at Williams College, both in person and through video-conference, who will be sharing the same syllabus. We will make a class visit to Williams, and we will host a visit from the Williams seminar. The shared meetings will be organized around speakers, presentations, and local activists.

AFCNA-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Courses in Other Departments Counting toward the Major and Minor in Africana Studies

Africana Studies
AFCNA-200Foundations of Africana Studies 4
AFCNA-206African Cities: Development Dreams and Nightmares in the Twentieth Century 4
AFCNA-208Introduction to Twentieth-Century Critical Race Theory 4
AFCNA-234Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama 4
AFCNA-238Black Political Thought 4
AFCNA-241AFTopics in Africana Studies: 'Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility' 4
AFCNA-241CVTopics in Africana Studies: 'The Culture of Civil Rights' 4
AFCNA-241FWTopics in Africana Studies: 'African American Women and United States History' 4
AFCNA-241HSTopics in Africana Studies: 'African American History, Precolonial to Emancipation' 4
AFCNA-251Contemporary African American Literature II 4
AFCNA-282African American History from Emancipation to Obama 4
AFCNA-301The Abolition Movement 4
AFCNA-302Urban Policy 4
AFCNA-308Luminous Darkness: African American Social Thought After DuBois 4
AFCNA-321Politics of Decolonization 4
AFCNA-339The Visual Culture of Protest 4
AFCNA-341NETopics in Africana Studies: 'Imperial Neoliberalism' 4
AFCNA-341PWTopics in Africana Studies: 'Power and Exchange in the African Past' 4
AFCNA-341SPTopics in Africana Studies: 'African Americans and Sports' 4
AFCNA-341TMTopics in Africana Studies: 'Toni Morrison' 4
AFCNA-351Sex, Race, and the Visual 4
AFCNA-356Black Migrations 4
AFCNA-369Black Radicalism 4
Anthropology
ANTHR-216HRSpecial Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology and Human Rights: Between Devil's Advocate and Rights Advocacy' 4
Critical Social Thought
CST-253Critical Race Theory 4
CST-339The Visual Culture of Protest 4
Dance
DANCE-132Introduction to Hip-Hop 1
DANCE-141West African Drumming for Dance 1
DANCE-142West African Dance 2
DANCE-232Intermediate Hip-Hop 1
Economics
ECON-225Economics of Health Care and Health Service Organizations 4
Education
EDUC-205Racism and Inequality in Schools and Society 4
English
ENGL-251Contemporary African American Literature II 4
ENGL-339The Visual Culture of Protest 4
ENGL-345RWStudies in American Literature: 'Richard Wright: Career and Influence' 4
ENGL-350TMTopics in African American Literature: 'Toni Morrison' 4
ENGL-351Sex, Race, and the Visual 4
Environmental Studies
ENVST-210Political Ecology 4
French
FREN-219Intermediate Level Courses in Culture and Literature: Introduction to the French-Speaking World 4
FREN-341FSCourses in Francophone Studies: 'Women and Writing in French-Speaking Africa' 4
FREN-341PACourses in Francophone Studies: 'Paris dans l'Imaginaire Africain' 4
FREN-341SECourses in Francophone Studies: 'Topic: Ousmane Sembene: The Work of a Militant Artist' 4
Geography
GEOG-217The African Environments 4
GEOG-313Third World Development 4
GEOG-319Africa: Problems and Prospects 4
GEOG-325Conflict and Displacement in Africa 4
Gender Studies
GNDST-206AFWomen and Gender in the Study of History: 'African Women: Food and Power' 4
GNDST-206FWWomen and Gender in the Study of History: 'African American Women and United States History' 4
History
HIST-180Introduction to Latin American Cultures 4
HIST-206African Cities: Development Dreams and Nightmares in the Twentieth Century 4
HIST-214History of Global Inequality 4
HIST-274Blacks in the North, Revolution to Reconstruction 4
HIST-280AATopics in North American History: 'African American Women and United States History' 4
HIST-281African American History, Precolonial to Emancipation 4
HIST-282African American History from Emancipation to Obama 4
HIST-287AFTopics in Latin American Studies: 'Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility' 4
HIST-291Education and Development in Africa: History and Ethnographic Research Methods 4
HIST-296AFWomen in History: 'African Women: Food and Power' 4
HIST-301ABColloquium: 'The Abolition Movement' 4
HIST-301EMColloquium: 'The Age of Emancipation' 4
HIST-341PWTopics in African History: 'Power and Exchange in the African Past' 4
Latin American Studies
LATAM-170Readings in Caribbean Literature 4
LATAM-180Introduction to Latin American Cultures 4
LATAM-260Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility 4
LATAM-277Caribbean Women Writers 4
Latina/o Studies
LATST-250RPSpecial Topics in Latina/o Studies: 'Race, Racism, and Power' 4
LATST-350RTSpecial Topics in Latina/o Studies: 'Critical Race Theory in Education' 4
Music
MUSIC-161Beginning West African Drumming Ensemble 1
MUSIC-226World Music 4
MUSIC-228African Folk Opera in Theory and Practice 4
MUSIC-229African Popular Music 4
MUSIC-261Intermediate West African Drumming Ensemble 1
Philosophy
PHIL-248Philosophical Issues in Race and Racism 4
Politics
POLIT-234Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama 4
POLIT-238Black Political Thought 4
POLIT-302Urban Policy 4
POLIT-313The Politics of Poverty 4
POLIT-321Politics of Decolonization 4
POLIT-356Black Migrations 4
POLIT-369Black Radicalism 4
POLIT-387AFAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'Same-Sex Politics in Africa' 4
Psychology
PSYCH-213Psychology of Racism 4
Religion
RELIG-216Whose Social Justice is it Anyway? Spirituality, Religion, and Civic Engagement 4
RELIG-230Spirituals and the Blues 4
Sociology
SOCI-214Race in America: Let's Talk 4
SOCI-316BLSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Black Cultural Production and Consumption' 4
SOCI-324Class in the Black Community 4