Gender Studies (GNDST)

GNDST-101 Introduction to Gender Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed to introduce students to social, cultural, historical, and political perspectives on gender and its construction. Through discussion and writing, we will explore the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality in multiple settings and contexts. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to a variety of questions, we will consider the distinctions between sex and gender, women's economic status, the making of masculinity, sexual violence, queer movements, racism, and the challenges of feminist activism across nations, and possibilities for change. We will also examine the development of feminist theory, including its promises and challenges.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Hwang, J. Luce, V. Zebadúa-Yáñez

GNDST-133 Introductory Topics in Feminist and Queer Studies

GNDST-201 Methods and Practices in Feminist Scholarship

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a class about doing research as a feminist. We will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist? What makes it research? What are the proper objects of feminist research? Who can do feminist research? What can feminist research do? Are there feminist ways of doing research? Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter? Some of the key issues and themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling. The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-204 Women and Gender in the Study of Culture

GNDST-204CP Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Trap Doors and Glittering Closets: Queer/Trans* of Color Politics of Recognition, Legibility, Visibility and Aesthetics'

Spring. Credits: 4

In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.

Crosslisted as: CST-249CP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

GNDST-204CW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-215, THEAT-234CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang

GNDST-204EM Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EM, CST-249EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

GNDST-204GV Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Gendered Violence in Spain'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This survey course will review the complex interaction of gender and violence as a personal and institutional issue in Spain from Medieval times to the present. What are the ideological and sociocultural constructs that sustain and perpetuate violence against women? What are the forms of resistance women have put into play? Among the texts, we will study short stories by Lucanor (thirteenth century) and María de Zayas (seventeenth century), song by Bebé and movie by Boya&iacuten (twentieth century), contemporary news (twenty-first century), and laws (from the thirteenth century to the present).

Crosslisted as: SPAN-230GV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Romero-Díaz
Prereq: SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

GNDST-204QT Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Queer and Trans Writing'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-219QT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 and 4 credits in Gender Studies

GNDST-204RP Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Race, Racism, and Power'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250RP, CST-249RP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
V. Rosa
Restrictions: This course is limited to sophomores and juniors.

GNDST-204SW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Sexuality and Women's Writing'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An examination of how U.S. women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first century represent sexuality in prose. Topics to include: lesbian, queer, homoerotic, and transgender possibilities; literary strategies for encoding sexuality, including modernist experiment and uses of genre; thematic interdependencies between sexuality and race; historical contexts, including the 'inversion' model of homosexuality and the Stonewall rebellion. Authors studied may include Barnes, Bechdel, Cather, Chopin, Feinberg, Highsmith, Jackson, Larsen, McCullers, Moraga, Nestle, Stein, and Truong; supplemental critical readings may include Butler, Lorde, Rich, and Sedgwick.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-286
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

GNDST-204TJ Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Transforming Justice and Practicing Truth to Power: Critical Methodologies and Methods in Community Participatory Action Research and Accountability'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center on questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

Crosslisted as: CST-249TJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

GNDST-204TR Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate knowledge/cultural production produced by trans* communities, particularly those multiply impacted by categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, citizenship and location. To understand the critical feminist genealogy/insurgency in which transgender studies/activism have become a field/site of political discourse, we will explore the overlaps and tensions between women/queer/trans* of color activism and theory. Using experimental and multimedia archives of affect, grief, desire, love, liberation and identitarian contradictions, we will ask how counter genealogies as process can transform how we relate to and inhabit power, futurity and memory.

Crosslisted as: CST-249TR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits from Gender Studies.

GNDST-204WH Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Worthy Hearts and Saucy Wits'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Eighteenth-century England witnessed the birth of the novel, a genre that in its formative years was both lauded for its originality and condemned as intellectually and morally dangerous, especially for young women. We will trace the numerous prose genres that influenced early novelists, including conduct manuals, epistolary writing, conversion narratives, travelogues, romance, and the gothic. In doing so, we will concomitantly examine the novel's immense formal experimentation alongside debates about developing notions of gender and class as well as the feeling, thinking individual. Authors may include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, Burney, and others.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-239WH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

GNDST-206 Women and Gender in History

GNDST-206AW Women and Gender in History: 'African Women's Work'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The power to produce food and reproduce society gave women significant public voice in African societies in the past. But over 200 years they lost that public voice and control over subsistence. Why, when women are still producing food and people, is the social and political voice of women so much less significant than it was before? We explore African womens' work of governing, production, and social reproduction across the tumultuous changes of the 20th century. The class seeks to provide an achievable yet challenging set of learning experiences for those who have no prior experience studying Africa, but also for those who have substantial previous engagement with African issues.

Crosslisted as: HIST-296AW, AFCNA-241AW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

GNDST-206CG Women and Gender in History: 'Women and Gender in China'

Spring. Credits: 4

This 200-level seminar introduces students to gender relations in the history of China. It offers students a broad historical narrative of women's lives from early China through the imperial period, and concludes with the power dynamics of gender relations in modern China in the twentieth century. The course is organized chronologically with thematic focus on the politics of marriage and reproduction; the state's shifting perspectives on women's social roles; and how women interpreted and responded to the changing cultural landscape.

Crosslisted as: HIST-296CG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Wu
Notes: All readings are in English.

GNDST-206FW Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'African American Women and United States History'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How is our understanding of U.S. history transformed when we place African American women at the center of the story? This course will examine the exclusion of African American women from dominant historical narratives and the challenge to those narratives presented by African American women's history through an investigation of selected topics in the field.

Crosslisted as: HIST-280AA, AFCNA-241FW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Renda

GNDST-206US Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'U.S. Women's History since 1890'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1880s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's social and cultural activism.

Crosslisted as: HIST-276
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda

GNDST-210 Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion

GNDST-210BD Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Buddhism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the contested roles and representations of Buddhist women in different historical and cultural contexts. Using a variety of ethnographic, historical, and textual sources, the course investigates both the challenges and opportunities Buddhist women have found in their religious texts, institutions, and communities.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-241
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Mrozik

GNDST-210JD Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Gender in Judaism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines gender as a key category in Jewish thought and practice. We will examine different theoretical models of gender, concepts of gender in a range of Jewish sources, and feminist Jewish responses to those sources.

Crosslisted as: JWST-234, RELIG-234
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Benjamin

GNDST-210NR Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women in New Topics in Religion: 'Women in New Religious Movements'

Spring. Credits: 4

Many new religious movements have advocated for women occupying unlikely roles of service and leadership. This course analyzes the intersection of religious alterity and gender equity. Primarily focusing on twentieth and twenty-first century new religions, the course considers how select women have shaped and transformed the structures of religions on the margins.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225NR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Coleman-Tobias

GNDST-210PH Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Philosophy'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to see how careful philosophical thought can help us with pressing issues that women face. We approach this topic through a distinctly feminist lens, as opposed to a traditional philosophical, queer theoretic, or gender studies lens. We will draw on a variety of philosophical resources, ranging from liberal and feminist political theory, to speech act theory. Possible questions we will consider include: What is objectification? What is consent? Is pornography degrading? How does sexism and bias lead to bad science?

Crosslisted as: PHIL-249
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

GNDST-210SL Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Gender in Islam'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine a range of ways in which Islam has constructed women--and women have constructed Islam. We will study concepts of gender as they are reflected in classical Islamic texts, as well as different aspects of the social, economic, political, and ritual lives of women in various Islamic societies.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-207
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Steinfels

GNDST-212 Women and Gender in Social Sciences

GNDST-212HR Women and Gender in Social Sciences: 'Human Rights Lab: Transnational Perspectives on LGBTQI and Women's Rights'

Spring. Credits: 4

The course will study the contemporary state of LGBTQI and Women's Rights worldwide and the strategies available to further them. At once a seminar and a practice-based workshop, students will learn about international human rights law, human rights monitoring and accountability mechanisms, and gender justice policies. Students will simulate writing UN reports, International NGO reports, country-based NGO reports, and undertake research on LGBTQI and women's rights violations. The focus topics will be gender-based violence, humanitarian policy, transitional justice, and economic empowerment. Several practitioners will join the course throughout the semester.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
V. Zebadúa Yáñez
Prereq: Introduction to Gender Studies or a social sciences introductory course (politics, sociology, anthropology, international relations, critical social thought, etc.).

GNDST-212HS Women and Gender in Social Sciences: 'Psychology of Human Sexuality'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the psychological study of human sexuality. We will take a psychobiosocial perspective in this course, covering topics such as reproductive anatomy and physiology, sexual response, sexually transmitted infections, contraceptive choices, pregnancy and birth, attraction and dating, love, sexual and relational communication, and consent. The goals of the course are to have students develop a strong understanding of human sexual biology, identity, behavior, and health, to understand how each of these areas is impacted by social context, and to engage with current research in the field.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-217
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
C. Flanders
Prereq: PSYCH-100.

GNDST-221 Feminist and Queer Theory

GNDST-221QF Feminist and Queer Theory: 'Feminist and Queer Theory'

Fall. Credits: 4

We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-241 Women and Gender in Science

GNDST-241HP Women and Gender in Science: 'Feminist Health Politics'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-216HP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 4 credits in gender studies.

GNDST-250 Gender and Power in Global Contexts

GNDST-290 Field Placement

Spring. Credits: 4

This course presents an opportunity for students to apply gender theory to practice and synthesize their work in gender studies. Connections between the academy and the community, scholarship and social action will be emphasized. Students will arrange for a placement at a non-profit organization, business, or institution that incorporates a gender focus. A weekly seminar with other students provides a structured reflection forum to analyze experience and methods.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive
C. Gundermann
Prereq: GNDST-101 and either GNDST-201 or GNDST-221.

GNDST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GNDST-333 Advanced Seminar

GNDST-333AD Advanced Seminar: 'Abolitionist Dreams & Everyday Resistance: Freedom Memoirs, Struggles, and Decolonizing Justice'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar will offer close theoretical readings of a variety of anti-colonial, abolitionist, anti-imperialist, insurgent and feminist-of-color memoir, autobiographical and social justice texts. We will read works from Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Assata Shakur, Patrisse Cullors, Grace Lee Boggs, Audre Lorde, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarsinna, Leila Khaled, Fannie Lou Hamer, Sarah Ahmed, Lee Maracle, Kai Cheng Thom, Angela Davis, Sojourner Truth, adrienne maree brown, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Mary Brave Bird, Jamaica Kincaid, Gabby Rivera and Haunani-Kay Trask. We will center the interlinking and capacious concepts of liberation, revolution, freedom, justice and decolonization.

Crosslisted as: CST-349AD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought at the 200 level or above.

GNDST-333AR Advanced Seminar: 'Anthropology of Reproduction'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course covers major issues in the anthropology of reproduction, including the relationship between production and reproduction, the gendered division of labor, the state and reproductive policy, embodied metaphors of procreation and parenthood, fertility control and abortion, crosscultural reproductive ethics, and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. We examine the social construction of reproduction in a variety of cultural contexts.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-306
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology or Gender Studies.

GNDST-333AX Advanced Topics: 'Making Waves: Gender and Sexuality in Asian America'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls--the U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian-American contexts: immigration, labor, racial stereotyping, militarization, citizenship, and so-called "terrorism." Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions about Asian Americans as regressive, repressed, or hyper-sexual, as well as examine the powerful counter-imaginaries offered within Asian American literature and culture.

Crosslisted as: CST-349AX
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Kim
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-333BD Advanced Seminar: 'Rethinking the Sexual Body'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary feminist study of sexuality. Its primary goal is to provide a forum for students to consider histories of sexuality and race in the U.S. both in terms of theoretical frameworks within gender studies, and in terms of a range of sites where those theoretical approaches become material, are negotiated, or are shifted. The course is a fully interdisciplinary innovation. It will emphasize links rather than differences between theory and practice and between cultural, material, and historical approaches to the body, gender, and sexuality. Throughout the course we will consider contemporary sexual politics in light of the co-constitutive histories of racial and sexual formations in science and culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Willey
Prereq: Coursework in feminist, queer, critical race, and/or critical ethnic studies.

GNDST-333BT Advanced Seminar: 'The Body Toxic: Narratives of Race, Disability, and Illness'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the intersections of race, disability, illness, and health using literature and culture as primary sites of engagement. Looking to writers like Audre Lorde, Anna Deavere Smith, Mia Mingus, Harriet Jacobs, and Indra Sinha, it asks how structures of racial, environmental, and economic inequity transform the category of disability, which critics have primarily defined in terms of whiteness. It also considers alternate conceptions of health--models that do not align with mandates of productivity or normative embodiment--offered by the texts under consideration, and asks what political/ social liberation might look like when able-bodiedness is no longer privileged.

Crosslisted as: CST-349BT
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Kim

GNDST-333CF Advanced Seminar: 'Survived, Punished and (Un)Deserving: Feminist Participatory Action Research Against Carceral Feminisms'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will consider the critical intervention of #SurvivedAndPunished, and the idea of "survivor defense as abolitionist praxis." Using principles and case studies from feminist and critical race action research, we will investigate the concepts of transformative justice, carceral feminism and anti-violence alongside the binaries of deserving/undeserving and good-victim/non-victim criminal. How does this relate to the corrective notions of rehabilitation, redemption and restitution? What does the criminalization of survivors of violence (i.e., gendered, racial, intimate partner, sexual and state violence) tell us about our limited views of justice and collective healing from harm?

Crosslisted as: CST-349CF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought at the 200 level or above.

GNDST-333DH Advanced Seminar: 'Desperate Housewives in 19th- through early 20th-century American Literature'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will explore visual and literary images of nineteenth through early 20th-century marriage and motherhood. Discussion of Virginia's Woolf's 'A Room of One's Own' and Barbara Welter's essay 'The Cult of True Womanhood' will serve as the springboard for our focus on representations of women in the home. We will incorporate a visit to the art museum, and will analyze film adaptations of some of the texts we read. The course will focus primarily on American literature, film, and art, with the exception of Ibsen's A Doll's House; selected written texts will include works by writers such as Hawthorne, James, Stowe, Gilman, Freeman, Chopin, Hurston, and Wharton.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-373DH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.

GNDST-333EF Advanced Seminar: 'Women Writers: Early Feminisms'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines a variety of "literary" expressions of women in Early Modern Spain and Colonial Latin America (e.g. Teresa de Avila, Catalina de Erauso, María de Zayas and sor Juana Inés de la Cruz). Attention will be paid to the formal means by which women writers emulated, appropriated, or subverted male-authored models, and how with her words and actions, they challenged modes of thinking and threatened patriarchal ideologies. A significant part of the class will deal with the ways in which contemporary feminist theories can be used to complement, interpret, and flesh out ideas expressed by these women in the past.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-330EF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Romero-Díaz
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Advisory: Online application required, see http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/gender/300level.html
Notes: Taught in Spanish

GNDST-333EG Advanced Seminar: 'Eggs and Embryos: Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts,documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316EG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

GNDST-333EM Advanced Seminar: 'Flesh and Blood: Naturecultural Embodiments'

Spring. Credits: 4

What does it mean to be (in?) a body? Who counts as whole, broken or food? How do discipline, punishment, use, reproduction, and illness come into play? What are agency, animacy, knowledge, consciousness in relation to embodiment? Western rationality has produced and disciplined a coherent, bounded, defended, racialized, and gendered bodily Self through medicine, psychiatry, nutrition, education, sexology, thanatology, obstetrics, and other disciplines. We will explore this production and its continual undoing, through topics such as medical diagnosis, disability, death and burial cultures, infection, diet, breastfeeding and dairy, chronic illness, depression, queerness, and hormone replacement.

Crosslisted as: CST-349EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: GNDST-101 and GNDST-221 or GNDST-201, or CST-200 or CST-248, or 8 credits in Anthropology, Sociology, History, Environmental Studies or Geography.

GNDST-333FC Advanced Seminar: 'Latin American Cinema: Beyond the Farm and the Factory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How do labor relationships and the social construction of what work means affect our lives as well as our communities? How do they contribute to shape our identities? In which ways can our gender, sexual orientation, race, social class or migratory status define our working possibilities? How do the concepts of marginality and informality emerge to identify the precarious Latin American labor conditions? Through Latin American films, students will problematize the idea of service, worker, industry, classic and non-classic work, sexual and affective work, and child labor, among others.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-374
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Pitetta

GNDST-333FM Advanced Seminar: 'Latina Feminism(s)'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Central to seminar discussions and student learning is a substantial community-based learning requirement that will facilitate a deeper engagement and analysis of the relationship between the concepts we explore in the course. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350FM, CST-349FM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
V. Rosa
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

GNDST-333GG Advanced Seminar: 'Race, Gender, and Empire: Cultural Histories of the United States and the World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Recent cultural histories of imperialism--European as well as U.S.--have illuminated the workings of race and gender at the heart of imperial encounters. This course will examine the United States' relationship to imperialism through the lens of such cultural histories. How has the encounter between Europe and America been remembered in the United States? How has the cultural construction of 'America' and its 'others' called into play racial and gender identities? How have the legacies of slavery been entwined with U.S. imperial ambitions at different times? And what can we learn from transnational approaches to 'the intimacies of empire?'

Crosslisted as: HIST-301RG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in History, or 4 credits in History and 8 credits in Gender Studies, or permission of the instructor by application to the History department.

GNDST-333GS Advanced Seminar: 'Gender and Sexual Minority Health'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a critical overview and investigation of health as it relates to the experiences of gender and sexual minority people. We will begin with exploring theoretical understandings of health and marginalization, and use those as frameworks to examine various domains of health. Areas of interest will include mental health, sexual and reproductive health, substance use, disability, and issues related to body size and image. We will end by looking at other structural issues that affect gender and sexual minority health, such as access to care, health education, and health policy.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-319GS
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
C. Flanders
Prereq: PSYCH-200 or PSYCH-204 or GNDST-201.

GNDST-333HH Advanced Seminar: 'Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone'

Spring. Credits: 4

A seminar on the eighteenth-century Chinese masterpiece The Story of the Stone and selected literary criticism in response to this work. Discussions will focus on love, gender-crossing, and women's supremacy and the paradoxical treatments of these themes in the novel. We will explore multiple aspects of these themes, including the sociopolitical, philosophical, and literary milieus of eighteenth-century China. We will also examine this novel in its relation to Chinese literary tradition in general and the generic conventions of premodern Chinese vernacular fiction in particular.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-340
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
Y. Wang
Advisory: Intended for East Asian Studies majors and Asian Studies minors.

GNDST-333LA Advanced Seminar: 'Writing as Women: Female Autobiographical Writings in Latin America'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Who speaks in a text? What relationship exists between literature, images and identity? How can we portray ourselves in specific socio-political contexts? How do women writers build themselves as authors in the context of a patriarchal literary tradition? How do they address problems of subjectivity, self-representation and self-legitimation? What are the challenges that the self-writing poses to women writers like a black Brazilian woman living in favelas who supports her family by digging through the garbage for paper and scraps to sell; a nun and poet during the colonial period in Mexico; a political prisoner and survivor from a Southern Cone concentration camp during the Argentinian dictatorship; K'iche' political activist and survivor of the Guatemalan Civil War? How do those challenges interact with those of other women writes with more privileged positions in their societies? The course focuses on a heterogeneous corpus of Latin American texts (novels, diaries, letters, poetry and memoirs) that display a literary female personae in a variety of contexts and how they shape the process of construction of woman as author in Latin America from the colonial period until now.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-330FA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Pitetta
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish

GNDST-333MC Advanced Seminar: 'Latinas/os/x and Housing: Mi Casa Is Not Su Casa'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Housing is closely tied to quality of life and the health of neighborhoods and communities. As a main goal of the "American Dream," homeownership has important significance on an individual and societal level. For immigrants, this goal is often out of reach as a result of racism and discriminatory housing policies. This interdisciplinary seminar explores Latinas/os/x relationship to housing and homeownership by examining: 1. the history of housing policy in the United States; 2. national identity, assimilation, and housing; and 3. discriminatory housing policies/programs and housing inequality. We explore topics including immigration, housing policy, public housing, segregation, gentrification, the suburbs, homelessness, eviction, affordability, and community building. Exploring this range of topics will help us develop a clearer understanding of why housing is one of the most pressing issues for Latinas/os/x today.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350MC, CST-349MC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
V. Rosa
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

GNDST-333ML Advanced Seminar: 'Mary Lyon's World and the History of Mount Holyoke'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What world gave rise to Mary Lyon's vision for Mount Holyoke and enabled her to carry her plans to success? What local and global circumstances subsequently shaped the institution and the women who passed through it? How did Mount Holyoke women attempt to fashion the worlds they encountered in and beyond South Hadley and what came of their efforts? We will inquire into the historical arrangements of power--involving race, class, gender, religion, culture, body politics, and colonialism--that formed Mount Holyoke and the world in which it has operated. Students write a substantial research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

Crosslisted as: HIST-333ML
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Prereq: 8 credits of History.
Advisory: Prior fulfillment of the multicultural requirement is required.

GNDST-333MM Advanced Seminar: 'A Landscape of One's Own: Nature and Gender in American Literature (Nineteenth and Twentieth Century)'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on portrayals of women in nineteenth through mid-twentieth century America, particularly in the context of nature and landscape. We will explore how women, often objectified in visual images of the period, appropriated established devices or developed new images and structures to represent womanhood in their own terms. Texts will include selected poetry, sketches, autobiographical essays or memoirs, short stories, novels, paintings, films, and photography. With Thoreau as our springboard, we will focus on women who told the stories of their lives in the context of islands, deserts, prairies and forests of the United States.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-373NT, ENVST-373WN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.

GNDST-333MS Advanced Seminar: 'Multi-Species Justice? Entangled Lives and Human Power'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How can we change animal exploitation and re-situate the human more equitably with other species? Through animal rights? Justice? Abolition? Dismantle human exceptionalism? Animal emancipation? Companionship? Co-existence? Stewardship? What are the uses and limits of the discourses from which critical animal studies borrows conceptually, for example: antiracism, feminism, disability studies, nationalism, transformative justice, and so on. We will explore different scenarios of human-nonhuman entanglements, such as training, rescue, the animal industrial complex, the politics of extinction, hunting, infection, predation, breeding/reproduction and others.

Crosslisted as: CST-349MS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann

GNDST-333NT Advanced Seminar: 'Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment And Survival'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Sexuality via current US law is largely conceived of as a singular identity axis, existing independently of other categories and social phenomena. Through critical queer, critical race and settler colonial theory, this course will study the concepts of sexual citizenship/respectability in relation to criminality of "deviant" sexualized, racialized, colonized bodies. In turn, we will explore recent modes of LGBT legal reform -- or rather "carceral feminisms" and "pink-washing." Lastly, we will focus on the unprecedented rate in which women/queer/trans people of color experience violence from the criminal justice system and its law enforcers, even in cases of survival and self-defense.

Crosslisted as: CST-349NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits from Gender Studies.

GNDST-333PA Advanced Seminar: 'Natural's Not in It: Pedro Almodóvar'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodovar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates. For instance, what can a weeping transvestite teach us about desire? What happens when plastic surgery and organ transplants become metaphors? Under what circumstances, if any, can spectators find child prostitution cute?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340PA, FLMST-380PA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: GNDST-101.
Notes: Weekly evening screenings. Taught in English.

GNDST-333PD Advanced Seminar: 'Primate Dramas: Kinship, Evolution, Theatricality'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores how intra-primate relations have been dramatized throughout the twentieth century, as species difference dis/entangled with racial, class, and ethnic identities. Each class will focus on one or more "primate dramas" (plays, films, stories, essays), which will be read alongside critical work from the interdisciplinary fields of gender, performance, and animal studies. The intertextuality of this material will be an important area of inquiry, as it suggests a narrative lineage evolving in response to scientific and cultural change. Familiarity with dramatic theory, feminist science studies, environmental studies, and/or film studies will be helpful.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-350PD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: One of the following: THEAT-251, THEAT-252, GNDST-101, GNDST-221, FLMST-201, ENVST-210.

GNDST-333PM Advanced Seminar: 'Poetry and Image: Formations of Identity'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With an emphasis on producing creative texts, the course will examine the parallel and often overlapping impulses of poetry and image-making (photography, painting, and other visual arts). We will explore concepts of identity through the work of artists such as Alice Neel, Mikalene Thomas, Claude Cahun, Cindy Sherman, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Catherine Opie, Kara Walker, Diane Arbus, Vivian Maier, and Nan Goldin. Writers will include Ocean Vuong, Danez Smith, Sherwin Bitsui, Robert Seydel, Ari Banias, Safia Elhillo, Gloria Anzaldúa, Morgan Parker, Layli Longsoldier, Judy Grahn, Audre Lorde, Ronaldo Wilson, Shane McCrae, Adrienne Rich, David Wojnarowisz, Eileen Myles, and others.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-361PM
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distrib. Rqmt; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Prereq: A 200-level creative writing course.

GNDST-333RN Advanced Seminar: 'Race / Nation / Gender: Feminist Studies of Scientific, Medical and 'Patient' Mobility'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores the potentially novel entanglements of 'race', 'nation' and 'gender' through the increasing transnationalization of scientific and medical practices, the mobility of practitioners and consumers, and the mobilization of scientific and medical knowledge by individuals and communities, as well as governmental and civil society organizations. We will engage with the multiple tensions in feminist research on topics such as diversity, population and medical genomics, and reproductive and medical tourism as the multiple and shifting identities of experts and 'lay' individuals call attention to the power and problematics of scientific, medical and patient 'diasporas'.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316RN
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

GNDST-333RT Advanced Seminar: 'Body and Gender in Religious Traditions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Do bodies matter in religious traditions? Whose bodies matter? How do they matter? By studying religious body ideals and practices, we examine the possibilities and problems different kinds of bodies have posed in religious traditions. Topics include religious diet, exercise, and dress; monasticism, celibacy, and sexuality; healing rituals, and slavery and violence. We pay special attention to contemporary challenges to problematic body ideals and practices coming from feminist, disability, postcolonial, queer, and trans theorists and activists.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-352, CST-349RE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Mrozik
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

GNDST-333SA Advanced Seminar: 'Women and Gender in Modern South Asia'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This colloquium will explore the history of South Asia as seen from women's perspectives. We will read writings by women from the ancient period to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences in a range of social, cultural, and religious contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, rights to education and employment, violence against women, modernity and citizenship--in short, those issues central to women's movements in modern South Asia. In addition to the textual sources, the course will analyze Indian popular film and the representation of women in this modern visual genre.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301SA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Instructor permission required.

GNDST-333SS Advanced Seminar: 'Gender and Class in the Victorian Novel'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will investigate how representations of gender and class serve as a structuring principle in the development of the genre of the Victorian novel in Britain. We will devote significant attention to the construction of Victorian femininity and masculinity in relation to class identity, marriage as a sexual contract, and the gendering of labor. The texts chosen for this course also reveal how gender and class are constructed in relation to other axes of identity in the period, such as race, sexuality, and national character. Novelists will include Dickens, Eliot, Gaskell, C. Bronte, and Hardy. Supplementary readings in literary criticism and theory.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-323
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sanborn
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

GNDST-333ST Advanced Seminar: 'Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinities, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate the racialization of masculinity (and the masculinization of race) as undergirded by heteropatriarchy, settler colonialism, militarized borders and imperialism. This course will center perspectives from various "Third World Solidarity" diasporas in order to challenge Western, hegemonic and inherent legacies of masculinity as modernity's (hu)man. Using critical race theory, feminist, queer/trans* of color critique (e.g., Wynter, Fanon, David Eng, José Muñoz), we will ask how whiteness (white supremacist masculinity) shapes and colors masculinity -- whether as exemplar, visible, illegible, failed, deviant and even toxic -- and what then falls outside of such a frame?

Crosslisted as: CST-349ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

GNDST-333TT Advanced Seminar: 'Sex and the Early Church'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the various ways first- through fifth-century Christians addressed questions regarding human sexuality. We will concentrate on the rise of sexual asceticism and pay particular attention to the relationship between sexuality and issues of gender, culture, power, and resistance. Primary readings will include letters, narrative accounts of female and male ascetics, monastic rules, and 'heretical' scriptures. These will be supplemented by modern scholarship in early Christian studies and the history of sexuality.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-306
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Prereq: One course in Religion or Gender Studies.

GNDST-333UU Advanced Seminar: 'Latina/o Immigration'

Fall. Credits: 4

The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.

Crosslisted as: LATST-360, CST-349UU
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
D. Hernández
Notes: Community-based learning is optional in this class.

GNDST-333VR Advanced Seminar: 'Viragos, Virgins, and Visionaries'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will study the three most celebrated French female saints: Jeanne d'Arc, Thérèse de Lisieux and Bernadette de Lourdes. Their stories are similar: ordinary young women to whom extraordinary things happened, who became symbols of France and inspired a rich verbal and visual iconography. Yet they are profoundly different: Joan was a warrior, Thérèse a memoirist, Bernadette a visionary. We will study the facts of their lives, in their own words and those of others, but also the many fictions, semi-fictions, myths and legends based on those lives. We will analyze a number of films and visual images as well as literary and non-literary texts in our attempt to understand these cases of specifically female, specifically French sainthood.

Crosslisted as: FREN-351VR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Rivers
Prereq: FREN-215 and one of FREN-219, FREN-225, FREN-230.

GNDST-333WF Advanced Seminar: 'Women and the Family in Imperial China'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the lives of women in imperial China (221 BCE-1911). How did Confucian didactic texts define women and their place in the family? Seen as the core of the family in a patrilineal, patrilocal, and patriarchical society, men prescribed women's roles in family life. How did women understand and respond to the social expectations imposed on them? What changed over the long history of imperial China? Students consider writings by and about women alongside the evidence of material culture.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301WF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Wu
Prereq: One course on East Asian history, culture, politics, or language.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

GNDST-333WH Advanced Seminar: 'What is a Woman?'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is a woman? French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir opened The Second Sex with this deceptively simple but, in effect, radical question. Beauvoir refuted essentialist substantiations of identity and interrogated -- through the categories of situation, ambiguity, and lived experience -- the politics of embodiment, freedom, and oppression. In this course, we bring her into conversation with feminist and trans* philosophers who have reflected on the political significance of sexual difference: Wittig, Irigaray, Lorde, Lugones, Butler, Bettcher, and Salamon. At the end of the course, we will re-assess our initial question and think about its resonance in feminist, trans* and intersex issues today.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
V. Zebadúa Yáñez
Prereq: An introductory course in Gender Studies, Critical Social Thought, Philosophy, or Politics.

GNDST-333WT Advanced Seminar: 'Witches in the Modern Imagination'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From the middle ages to the present day, witches have evoked both fear and fascination. Their fellowships (real or fantastic) challenged the prevailing power structures of church and state patriarchies and upset the ordered precepts of the modern world. This seminar offers an overview of the history of witchcraft in Atlantic cultures, with special attention to the early modern British and American colonial eras. We will examine figures of the witch in European art; religious and legal texts that document the persecution of sorcerers; and dramatic, literary, and cinematic representations of witches that have helped to shape our understanding of gender, nature, theatricality, and power.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: One course from Gender Studies, Film Studies, or Theatre Arts.
Advisory: Required online application, preference to Gender Studies and Theatre Arts majors.

GNDST-392 Senior Seminar

Fall. Credits: 4

This capstone course brings seniors together to think through relationships among empirical research, theory, activism, and practice in gender studies. Majors with diverse interests, perspectives, and expertise (and other seniors with substantial background in the field) will have the opportunity to reflect on the significance of their gender studies education in relation to their current work (including work in 333s, 390, 395), their academic studies as a whole, and their plans for the future. Course readings and discussion will be shaped by students in collaboration with the instructor.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Gundermann
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.

GNDST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.