Gender Studies (GNDST)

GNDST-101 Introduction to Gender Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed to introduce students to social, cultural, historical, and political perspectives on gender and its construction. Through discussion and writing, we will explore the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality in multiple settings and contexts. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to a variety of questions, we will consider the distinctions between sex and gender, women's economic status, the making of masculinity, sexual violence, queer movements, racism, and the challenges of feminist activism across nations, and possibilities for change. We will also examine the development of feminist theory, including its promises and challenges.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Brown, J. Luce, R. Rothmuller, E. Rundle, E. Vitulli
Advisory: 01 and 02 sections are open to first-years and sophomores only. 03 is open to juniors and seniors only.

GNDST-201 Methods and Practices in Feminist Scholarship

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a class about doing research as a feminist. We will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist? What makes it research? What are the proper objects of feminist research? Who can do feminist research? What can feminist research do? Are there feminist ways of doing research? Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter? Some of the key issues and themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling. The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Willey
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-204 Women and Gender in the Study of Culture

GNDST-204AW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Twentieth-Century American Women Writers'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the work of a variety of twentieth-century women writers located in the United States, focusing on the genre of prose fiction and the themes of gender, race, and sexuality. Particular attention will be paid to developments in African American women's writing, to Southern writers, and lesbian literary representation. Writers may include Gwendolyn Brooks, Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Carson McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, Gertrude Stein, Alice Walker, Edith Wharton, and Hisaye Yamamoto.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-271
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

GNDST-204CU Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Imagining Cuba: Between History and Memory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to critical and creative works that center Cuba and its diasporas. The primary questions of the course are: How have authors varyingly imagined Cuba over time and across space? How are these imaginings of Cuba politically, economically, and culturally situated? Students will question the personal/national and the public/private across a range of texts that explore issues of exile, nostalgia, memory, and nationalism. Readings include works by Cristina Garcia, Ana Menendez, Pablo Medina, Achy Obejas, Roberto G. Fernandez, Carmelita Tropicana, Richard Blanco, and Rachel Kushner and readings by Gustavo Perez Firmat, Sheila Croucher, and Louis A. Perez, Jr.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250CU, LATAM-287CU
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Hernández

GNDST-204CW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Dream of the Red Chamber, Story of the Western Chamber, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: ASAIN-215, THEAT-234CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang

GNDST-204EM Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Spring. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EM, CST-249EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

GNDST-204LF Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Spanish Women Through Literature and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the history of Spanish women from a critical and interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include a variety of feminist issues, from domestic violence to maternity and equality. There is a strong emphasis on developing analytical strategies for reading and speaking, improving skills for (creative) writing, and designing pedagogical materials for teaching. Course examines works by María de Zayas, Federico García Lorca, and Ana Rossetti, and movies by Icíar Bollaín and Bigas Luna, among others.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-230LF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Romero-Díaz
Prereq: SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

GNDST-204LT Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Introduction to Latina/o Literatures'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will explore a number of readings across different genres (the novel, play, poem, short story, graphic novel). Students will endeavor to understand how each author defines Latinidad. What characterizes Latina/os for each of these writers and how do their works articulate the historical conditions out of which they emerge? How is Latina/o literature marked by notions of language, nationality, gender, sexuality, class, race, politics, form, and genre? The readings will provide both a survey of general ideas in the study of Latina/o literatures as well as specific case studies and historical examples. The reading list is not meant to be comprehensive but to provide a sampling of texts.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-218LT, LATST-212
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Hernández

GNDST-204QT Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Queer and Trans Writing'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-219QT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 and 4 credits in Gender Studies

GNDST-204SW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Sexuality and Women's Writing'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An examination of how U.S. women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first century represent sexuality in prose. Topics to include: lesbian, queer, homoerotic, and transgender possibilities; literary strategies for encoding sexuality, including modernist experiment and uses of genre; thematic interdependencies between sexuality and race; historical contexts, including the 'inversion' model of homosexuality and the Stonewall rebellion. Authors studied may include Barnes, Bechdel, Cather, Chopin, Feinberg, Highsmith, Jackson, Larsen, McCullers, Moraga, Nestle, Stein, and Truong; supplemental critical readings may include Butler, Lorde, Rich, and Sedgwick.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-286
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

GNDST-204WH Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Worthy Hearts and Saucy Wits'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Eighteenth-century England witnessed the birth of the novel, a genre that in its formative years was both lauded for its originality and condemned as intellectually and morally dangerous, especially for young women. We will trace the numerous prose genres that influenced early novelists, including conduct manuals, epistolary writing, conversion narratives, travelogues, romance, and the gothic. In doing so, we will concomitantly examine the novel's immense formal experimentation alongside debates about developing notions of gender and class as well as the feeling, thinking individual. Authors may include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, Burney, and others.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-239WH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

GNDST-206 Women and Gender in History

GNDST-206AF Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'African Women: Food and Power'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course uses archival records, fiction, life histories, and outstanding recent scholarship to investigate African women's actions in a century that encompassed women's loss of agency and authority but the endurance of their responsibility for the production of food. We investigate the erosion of women's economic power and the loss of women's work of governing at conquest, in the early colonial period, and as a consequence of Africa's integration into the world economy as its least powerful player. We examine women's efforts to sustain productive activities in the face of opposition and the gendered tensions these efforts provoke. Optional fourth hour discussions.

Crosslisted as: HIST-296AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

GNDST-206FW Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'African American Women and United States History'

Spring. Credits: 4

How is our understanding of U.S. history transformed when we place African American women at the center of the story? This course will examine the exclusion of African American women from dominant historical narratives and the challenge to those narratives presented by African American women's history through an investigation of selected topics in the field.

Crosslisted as: HIST-280AA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Renda

GNDST-206TH Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'Trans Histories, Identities, and Communities'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the history of trans communities and identities and the development of trans activism in the US, focusing on how race, gender, sexuality, and class have affected transgender lives, communities, and politics. In doing so we will explore a number of topics including the social, medical, and political constructions of gender deviance; medical and social constructions of transsexuality; social, political, and other constructions of the category transgender; and the politics of trans liberation. While we will focus on the US, we will also briefly explore some examples of "trans" identities and communities in other parts of the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Vitulli
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-206US Women and Gender in the Study of History: 'U.S. Women's History since 1890'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1880s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's social and cultural activism.

Crosslisted as: HIST-276
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda

GNDST-210 Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion

GNDST-210BD Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Buddhism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the contested roles and representations of Buddhist women in different historical and cultural contexts. Using a variety of ethnographic, historical, and textual sources, the course investigates both the challenges and opportunities Buddhist women have found in their religious texts, institutions, and communities.

Crosslisted as: Religion 241
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Mrozik

GNDST-210PH Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Philosophy'

Spring. Credits: 4

The goal of this course is to see how careful philosophical thought can help us with pressing issues that women face. We approach this topic through a distinctly feminist lens, as opposed to a traditional philosophical, queer theoretic, or gender studies lens. We will draw on a variety of philosophical resources, ranging from liberal and feminist political theory, to speech act theory. Possible questions we will consider include: What is objectification? What is consent? Is pornography degrading? How does sexism and bias lead to bad science?

Crosslisted as: PHIL-249
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Webster

GNDST-210SL Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Gender in Islam'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine a range of ways in which Islam has constructed women--and women have constructed Islam. We will study concepts of gender as they are reflected in classical Islamic texts, as well as different aspects of the social, economic, political, and ritual lives of women in various Islamic societies.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-207
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Steinfels
Notes: This course counts toward the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies majors and minors.

GNDST-210WB Women and Gender in Philosophy and Religion: 'Women and Buddhism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the contested roles and representations of Buddhist women in different historical and cultural contexts. Using a variety of ethnographic, historical, and textual sources, the course investigates both the challenges and opportunities Buddhist women have found in their religious texts, institutions, and communities.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-241
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Mrozik

GNDST-212 Women and Gender in Social Sciences

GNDST-221 Feminist and Queer Theory

GNDST-221CC Feminist and Queer Theory: 'Introduction to Feminist Theory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the overlapping dualities of the feminine and the masculine, the private and the public, the home and the world. We examine different forms of power over the body; the ways gender and sexual identities reinforce or challenge the established order; and the cultural determinants of 'women's emancipation.' We emphasize the politics of feminism, dealing with themes that include culture, democracy, and the particularly political role of theory and on theoretical attempts to grasp the complex ties and tensions between sex, gender, and power.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-233
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
E. Markovits
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

GNDST-221QF Feminist and Queer Theory: 'Feminist and Queer Theory'

Fall. Credits: 4

We will read a number of key feminist texts that theorize sexual difference, and challenge the oppression of women. We will then address queer theory, an offshoot and expansion of feminist theory, and study how it is both embedded in, and redefines, the feminist paradigms. This redefinition occurs roughly at the same time (1980s/90s) when race emerges as one of feminism's prominent blind spots. The postcolonial critique of feminism is a fourth vector we will examine, as well as anti-racist and postcolonial intersections with queerness. We will also study trans-theory and its challenge to the queer paradigm.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Vitulli
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-241 Women and Gender in Science

GNDST-241HP Women and Gender in Science: 'Feminist Health Politics'

Fall. Credits: 4

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-216HP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 4 credits in gender studies.

GNDST-250 Gender and Power in Global Contexts

GNDST-250AB Gender and Power in Global Contexts: 'The Politics of Abortion in the Americas'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The Americas have been characterized by the strictness of their laws in the criminalization of abortion. In some countries abortion is criminalized even when the woman's life is at risk. What role have women's movements played in advancing abortion rights? What has mattered most for a movement's success, its internal characteristics or external forces? Has the way the movement framed its demands mattered? How has the political influence of the Catholic and Evangelical churches influenced policies in this area? We will answer these questions by exploring examples from across the region through primary and secondary sources.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-255PA
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Fernandez-Anderson

GNDST-250RP Gender and Power in Global Contexts: 'Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin America'

Spring. Credits: 4

Since the 1990s Latin America has witnessed increasing societal and political debates over sexual and reproductive rights. Issues such as abortion, gay marriage, transgender rights, sexual education and assisted reproductive technology have risen to the top of some countries' agendas after decades of silence, taboos, and restrictive or non-existent legislation. The course aims to provide a survey of sexual and reproductive rights in the region as a whole while at the same time highlighting the disparities that exist within it. The course analyzes the multiple factors behind the current policies focusing particularly on the role of women and LGBT movements advancing more liberal legislation.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-255RP, LATAM-287RP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. Fernandez-Anderson
Advisory: Previous coursework in Latin American Studies and/or Gender Studies recommended.

GNDST-250TM Gender and Power in Global Contexts: 'Land, Transnational Markets, and Democracy in Women's Lives and Activism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will address the predicaments of women who must negotiate local contexts shaped by transnational markets, changing patterns of agriculture and agro-forestry, and struggles over indigenous land rights. How have arguments about democracy shaped the struggles women take up locally, nationally, and transnationally in opposition to corporate power, national policies, and supranational agencies such as the World Trade Organization?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department

GNDST-290 Field Placement

Spring. Credits: 4

This course presents an opportunity for students to apply gender theory to practice and synthesize their work in gender studies. Connections between the academy and the community, scholarship and social action will be emphasized. Students will arrange for a placement at a non-profit organization, business, or institution that incorporates a gender focus. A weekly seminar with other students provides a structured reflection forum to analyze experience and methods.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive
C. Gundermann
Prereq: GNDST-101 and either GNDST-201 or GNDST-221.

GNDST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GNDST-333 Advanced Seminar

Instructor permission required.

GNDST-333AA Advanced Seminar: 'Emily Dickinson in Her Times'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine the writing of Emily Dickinson, both her poetry and her letters. We will consider the cultural, historical, political, religious, and familial environment in which she lived. Special attention will be paid to Dickinson's place as a woman artist in the nineteenth century.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-359
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Ackmann
Prereq: 8 credits in English or 8 credits in Gender Studies.
Notes: The class will meet at the Dickinson Museum (280 Main Street in Amherst and accessible by Five College bus).

GNDST-333AR Advanced Seminar: 'Anthropology of Reproduction'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course covers major issues in the anthropology of reproduction, including the relationship between production and reproduction, the gendered division of labor, the state and reproductive policy, embodied metaphors of procreation and parenthood, fertility control and abortion, crosscultural reproductive ethics, and the social implications of new reproductive technologies. We examine the social construction of reproduction in a variety of cultural contexts.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-306
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology or Gender Studies.

GNDST-333AS Advanced Seminar: 'Anthropology and Sexualities'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on contemporary anthropological scholarship concerned with the varieties of sexual expression in diverse cultural settings. We will read ethnographic accounts of sexual ideologies and the politics and practices of sexuality in Brazil, Japan, Native North America, India, and elsewhere. We will examine anthropological theories of sexuality with an emphasis on contemporary issues, including performance theory, "third gender" theories, sexual identity formulation, and techniques used by various societies to discipline the body.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-331
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology, Gender Studies, or a combination of the two.

GNDST-333AX Advanced Topics: 'Making Waves: Gender and Sexuality in Asian America'

Spring. Credits: 4

Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls--the U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian-American contexts: immigration, labor, racial stereotyping, militarization, citizenship, and so-called "terrorism." Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions about Asian Americans as regressive, repressed, or hyper-sexual, as well as examine the powerful counter-imaginaries offered within Asian American literature and culture.

Crosslisted as: CST-349AX
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Kim
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-333BB Advanced Seminar: 'Women in American Theatre and Drama'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers a history of women in performance, from the colonial era to the present day. Americans inherited a European theatrical economy that was largely male dominated, though actresses played a central role on stage and in the public imagination. Today, while serious inequities remain, women are gaining access to the most privileged and powerful positions in a swiftly changing field. We are therefore equally interested in how women have participated in theatrical culture--as actors, producers, playwrights, directors, designers, managers, and audience members--and how they have been represented on commercial, experimental, and regional stages, and across genres and communities.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-350WO
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Prereq: GNDST-101 or THEAT-100 or THEAT-251 or THEAT-252 or CST-252.

GNDST-333BW Advanced Seminar: 'De Brujas y Lesbiana and Other "Bad Women" in the Spanish Empire'

Fall. Credits: 4

During the Spanish Empire (16th-18th centuries), witches, prostitutes, transvestite warriors, lesbians and daring noblewomen and nuns violated the social order by failing to uphold the expected sexual morality of the ideal woman. They were silenced, criticized, punished, and even burned at the stake. Students will study contradictory discourses of good and evil and beauty and ugliness in relation to gender in the Spanish Empire. We will analyze historical and literary texts as well as film versions of so-called "bad" women -- such as the Celestina, Elena/o de Céspedes, Catalina de Erauso and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-330BW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Romero-Díaz
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

GNDST-333DP Advanced Seminar: 'Psychology of Trauma'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What happens after a traumatic event? Why do some people develop psychological disorders and others do not? This course will explore the psychological theories and research on trauma and stress. Topics covered will include childhood abuse, domestic violence, combat violence, community violence, and interpersonal violence. The seminar will explore psychological dysfunction, disorders, as well as adaptation and coping following exposure to traumatic stress. In addition, the course will explore the concept of "cultural trauma.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-329PT
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Douglas
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 100-level Psychology course and PSYCH-201.
Advisory: A course in abnormal psychology preferred.

GNDST-333EG Advanced Seminar: 'Eggs and Embryos: Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts,documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316EG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

GNDST-333EM Advanced Seminar: 'Embodiments'

Spring. Credits: 4

(Em)bodi/ment: body/mind. How does our culture fantasize about severing them? Where is there ever pure mind, pure body? Who counts as able, as broken, or as food? How does discipline, punishment, and usefulness come into play? What is agency and knowledge in relation to embodiment? We will study different 'problem' cases of embodiment where the fabric of culture begins to unravel: athletics, birthing, breeding and assisted reproduction, chronic illness, dairy, disability, drugs, dying, fatness, pregnancy, queerness, sexuality, speech ('disorder'), and others. Much of the seminar's agenda will be driven by students' own research and interests in studying embodiment.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: GNDST-101.
Notes: First years require special permission

GNDST-333FA Advanced Seminar: 'Modern Families: Race/Ethnicity, Kinship and U.S. Popular Culture'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the social construction of the family unit in the United States across a range of historical periods and cultural texts. Students will dismantle universalist notions of what constitutes a family (particularly the nuclear family), understanding it instead as a social unit articulated by issues of race/ethnicity, gender, and sexuality and (re)produced with spatial and temporal specificities. Engaging first with historical texts to understand kinship as a legal, political and economic project, we will then turn to cultural production to investigate the role that literature, film, television, and art play in reifying, challenging, and/or reproducing the family.

Crosslisted as: LATST-332
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Hernández

GNDST-333FC Advanced Seminar: 'Beyond the Farm and and The Factory: Precarious Lives and the Representations of Labor in Latin American Cinema'

Spring. Credits: 4

How do labor relationships and the social construction of what work means affect our lives as well as our communities? How do they contribute to shape our identities? In which ways can our gender, sexual orientation, race, social class or migratory status define our working possibilities? How do the concepts of marginality and informality emerge to identify the precarious Latin American labor conditions? Through Latin American films, students will problematize the idea of service, worker, industry, classic and non-classic work, sexual and affective work, and child labor, among others.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-374
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Pitetta
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in Latin American Studies or related field.

GNDST-333FM Advanced Seminar: 'Latina Feminism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism as a distinct mode of thought and inquiry. In particular, we will examine how Latina feminist approaches inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenges patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to the politics of feminist analysis, representation, colonialism and empire, and Latina feminist methodologies. Our approach in this class will employ an interlocking analysis to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop an understanding of how Latina feminist methodology and epistemology can be tools for social change.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350FM, CST-349FM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
V. Rosa

GNDST-333GG Advanced Seminar: 'Race, Gender, and Empire: Cultural Histories of the United States and the World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Recent cultural histories of imperialism--European as well as U.S.--have illuminated the workings of race and gender at the heart of imperial encounters. This course will examine the United States' relationship to imperialism through the lens of such cultural histories. How has the encounter between Europe and America been remembered in the United States? How has the cultural construction of 'America' and its 'others' called into play racial and gender identities? How have the legacies of slavery been entwined with U.S. imperial ambitions at different times? And what can we learn from transnational approaches to 'the intimacies of empire?'

Crosslisted as: HIST-301RG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in History or Gender Studies.

GNDST-333HH Advanced Seminar: 'Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A seminar on the eighteenth-century Chinese masterpiece The Story of the Stone and selected literary criticism in response to this work. Discussions will focus on love, gender-crossing, and women's supremacy and the paradoxical treatments of these themes in the novel. We will explore multiple aspects of these themes, including the sociopolitical, philosophical, and literary milieus of eighteenth-century China. We will also examine this novel in its relation to Chinese literary tradition in general and the generic conventions of premodern Chinese vernacular fiction in particular.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-340
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
Y. Wang
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

GNDST-333MD Advanced Seminar: 'Mothers and Daughters'

Spring. Credits: 4

Study of this crucial and problematic relationship in modern novels and films from Romance cultures. Exploration of the mother-daughter bond as literary theme, social institution, psychological dynamic, and metaphor for female creativity. Readings include Western myths and diverse theories of family arrangements (Rousseau, Freud, Chodorow, Rich, Irigaray, Giorgio, Mernissi, Nnaemeka). Authors and films will be grouped cross-culturally by theme and chosen from among: Colette, Vivanti, Morante, Ernaux, Tusquets, Roy, Roig, Rodoreda, Martin Gaite, Ramondino, Pineau, Beyala, Bouraoui; films: Children of Montmartre (La maternelle); Indochine; The Silences of the Palace; My Mother Likes Women.

Crosslisted as: ROMLG-375MD, SPAN-360MD, ITAL-361MD, FREN-321MD Italian 361MD, French 321MD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Gelfand
Advisory: For Language Majors: two courses in culture and literature at the 200 level. Also open to non-language majors with no prerequisite.
Notes: Note: Students wishing to obtain 300-level credit in French, Italian, or Spanish must read texts and write papers in the Romance language for which they wish to receive credit.

GNDST-333ML Advanced Seminar: 'Mary Lyon's World and the History of Mount Holyoke'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What world gave rise to Mary Lyon's vision for Mount Holyoke and enabled her to carry her plans to success? What local and global circumstances subsequently shaped the institution and the women who passed through it? How did Mount Holyoke women attempt to fashion the worlds they encountered in and beyond South Hadley and what came of their efforts? We will inquire into the historical arrangements of power--involving race, class, gender, religion, culture, body politics, and colonialism--that formed Mount Holyoke and the world in which it has operated. Students write a substantial research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

Crosslisted as: HIST-333ML
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Prereq: 8 credits of History.
Advisory: Prior fulfillment of the multicultural requirement is required.

GNDST-333MM Advanced Seminar: 'Nature and Gender: Representations of Women and Nature in American Literature (Nineteenth-Twentieth Century)'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on portrayals of women in nineteenth through mid-twentieth century America, particularly in the context of nature and landscape. We will explore how women, often objectified in visual images of the period, appropriated established devices or developed new images and structures to represent womanhood in their own terms. Texts will include selected poetry, sketches, autobiographical essays or memoirs, short stories, novels, paintings, films, and photography.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-373NT, ENVST-373WN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies.

GNDST-333PA Advanced Seminar: 'Natural's Not in It: Pedro Almodóvar'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodovar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates. For instance, what can a weeping transvestite teach us about desire? What happens when plastic surgery and organ transplants become metaphors? Under what circumstances, if any, can spectators find child prostitution cute?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340PA, FLMST-380PA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: GNDST-101.
Notes: Weekly evening screenings. Taught in English.

GNDST-333PG Advanced Seminar: 'Who's Involved?: Participatory Governance, Emerging Technologies and Feminism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Deep brain stimulation, genome sequencing, regenerative medicine...Exploring practices of 'participatory governance' of emerging technologies, we will examine the formal and informal involvement of citizens, patients, health professionals, scientists and policy makers. What initiatives exist at local, national and transnational levels to foster science literacy? How do lived experiences of nationality, ability, class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality become visible and/or disappear within constructed frameworks of participatory governance? How can feminist ethnographic research and feminist theory contribute to a larger project of democratizing knowledge production and governance?

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316PG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

GNDST-333PN Advanced Seminar: 'Prison Nation: Criminalization and Mass Incarceration in the U.S.'

Fall. Credits: 4

Since the 1970s, the United States has engaged in the most massive expansion of a prison system in modern history. Scholars have called the current era of U.S. imprisonment "mass incarceration" to mark the systematic imprisonment of black, Latina/o, and native people, poor people, and some LGBT populations. This course will examine the political, economic, and social conditions that produced mass incarceration as well as its ongoing material effects. We will also analyze mass incarceration and the prison as a site of social, racial, gender, and sexual formation. To do so, the course will center on black feminist and queer analysis.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Vitulli
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-333RC Advanced Seminar: 'The Philosophy of Recognition'

Fall. Credits: 4

Since the 1960s, many social movements for justice, equality, and inclusion in our world have taken the form of struggles for recognition (e.g., antiracism, feminism, multiculturalism, LGBT activism, etc.). What is recognition in this sense and conversely misrecognition, i.e., the sort of harm or injustice done to someone or certain populations of people by failing or choosing not to recognize them? How can (mis)recognition show up and be theorized both as a matter of how people are (unjustly) socially constituted and how they should (not) treat one another? We will discuss readings (among others) from Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Hannah Arendt, Iris Young, Charles Taylor, Axel Honneth, Nancy Fraser, and Patchen Markell.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-353RC, CST-349RC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Koo
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One prior course at the 200 level in philosophy, politics, sociology, critical social thought, or gender studies.

GNDST-333RN Advanced Seminar: 'Race / Nation / Gender: Feminist Studies of Scientific, Medical and 'Patient' Mobility'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores the potentially novel entanglements of 'race', 'nation' and 'gender' through the increasing transnationalization of scientific and medical practices, the mobility of practitioners and consumers, and the mobilization of scientific and medical knowledge by individuals and communities, as well as governmental and civil society organizations. We will engage with the multiple tensions in feminist research on topics such as diversity, population and medical genomics, and reproductive and medical tourism as the multiple and shifting identities of experts and 'lay' individuals call attention to the power and problematics of scientific, medical and patient 'diasporas'.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316RN
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

GNDST-333RT Advanced Seminar: 'Body Images and Practices in Religious Traditions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar examines body images and practices in a range of religions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and indigenous traditions. Some of the topics we will discuss are religious exercise regimens, dietary laws, gender and sexuality, healing practices, religious icons, ordination, and slavery.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-352
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Mrozik
Instructor permission required.

GNDST-333SA Advanced Seminar: 'Women and Gender in Modern South Asia'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This colloquium will explore the history of South Asia as seen from women's perspectives. We will read writings by women from the ancient period to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences in a range of social, cultural, and religious contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, rights to education and employment, violence against women, modernity and citizenship--in short, those issues central to women's movements in modern South Asia. In addition to the textual sources, the course will analyze Indian popular film and the representation of women in this modern visual genre.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301SA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. S. Datla
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

GNDST-333SC Advanced Seminar: 'GLBT Issues in Schools'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine heterosexism and transgender oppression in K-12 schools in the U.S. Additionally, this course will focus on how teachers and administrators can work to create transformative and liberatory spaces for GLBT youth in education. Students will be introduced to topics such as nontraditional family structures, bullying, bystander intervention, youth development and adultism. Essays and a final project are required.

Crosslisted as: EDUST-321
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Daigle-Matos
Advisory: Education 205 strongly recommended.

GNDST-333SS Advanced Seminar: 'Gender and Class in the Victorian Novel'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will investigate how representations of gender and class serve as a structuring principle in the development of the genre of the Victorian novel in Britain. We will devote significant attention to the construction of Victorian femininity and masculinity in relation to class identity, marriage as a sexual contract, and the gendering of labor. The texts chosen for this course also reveal how gender and class are constructed in relation to other axes of identity in the period, such as race, sexuality, and national character. Novelists will include Dickens, Eliot, Gaskell, C. Bronte, and Hardy. Supplementary readings in literary criticism and theory.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-323
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English, including ENGL-220 or ENGL-230.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

GNDST-333TT Advanced Seminar: 'Sex and the Early Church'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the various ways first- through fifth-century Christians addressed questions regarding human sexuality. We will concentrate on the rise of sexual asceticism and pay particular attention to the relationship between sexuality and issues of gender, culture, power, and resistance. Primary readings will include letters, narrative accounts of female and male ascetics, monastic rules, and 'heretical' scriptures. These will be supplemented by modern scholarship in early Christian studies and the history of sexuality.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-306
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Penn
Prereq: One course in Religion or Gender Studies.

GNDST-333UU Advanced Seminar: 'Latina/o Immigration'

Fall. Credits: 4

The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.

Crosslisted as: LATST-360, SOCI-316MM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
D. Hernández
Notes: Community-based learning is optional in this class.

GNDST-333VR Advanced Seminar: 'Viragos, Virgins, and Visionaries'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will study the three most celebrated French female saints: Jeanne d'Arc, Thérèse de Lisieux and Bernadette de Lourdes. Their stories are similar: ordinary young women to whom extraordinary things happened, who became symbols of France and inspired a rich verbal and visual iconography. Yet they are profoundly different: Joan was a warrior, Thérèse a memoirist, Bernadette a visionary. We will study the facts of their lives, in their own words and those of others, but also the many fictions, semi-fictions, myths and legends based on those lives. We will analyze a number of films and visual images as well as literary and non-literary texts in our attempt to understand these cases of specifically female, specifically French sainthood.

Crosslisted as: FREN-351VR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Rivers
Prereq: Take FREN-215 and one of FREN-219, FREN-225, FREN-230.

GNDST-333VV Advanced Seminar: 'Women Experimental Filmmakers'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar examines experimental cinema made by women from the early 1950s, during the earliest years of the movement known as the American Avant-Garde, through the 1990s. While the class will read feminist film theory and see the work of such well-known filmmakers as Yvonne Rainer, Sally Potter, and Chantal Akerman, we will also examine the less familiar but highly influential films of women working in the home movie or diary mode, with particular emphasis on the work of Marie Menken.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-340EX
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies.
Advisory: Application required, see: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/gender/300level.html
Notes: 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)

GNDST-333WF Advanced Seminar: 'Women and the Family in Imperial China'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the lives of women in imperial China (221 BCE-1911). How did Confucian didactic texts define women and their place in the family? Seen as the core of the family in a patrilineal, patrilocal, and patriarchical society, men prescribed women's roles in family life. How did women understand and respond to the social expectations imposed on them? What changed over the long history of imperial China? Students consider writings by and about women alongside the evidence of material culture.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301WF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Wu
Prereq: One course on East Asian history, culture, politics, or language.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

GNDST-333WL Advanced Seminar: 'The Art of Fact: Writing the Lives of Women'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine narrative nonfiction biographies written by women biographers in order to determine the specific ways in which women tell the stories of other women's lives. We will investigate stylistic and theoretical approaches to writing biographies in which gender is a central focus. We will ask if 'feminist biography' constitutes a literary genre. We will experience the challenges (and thrills) of conducting archival and primary research. The course will culminate in students writing chapter-length biographies.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-302WL
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Ackmann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in English or 8 credits in Gender Studies.

GNDST-333WT Advanced Seminar: 'Witches in the Modern Imagination'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From the middle ages to the present day, witches have evoked both fear and fascination. Their fellowships (real or fantastic) challenged the prevailing power structures of church and state patriarchies and upset the ordered precepts of the modern world. This seminar offers an overview of the history of witchcraft in Atlantic cultures, with special attention to the early modern British and American colonial eras. We will examine figures of the witch in European art; religious and legal texts that document the persecution of sorcerers; and dramatic, literary, and cinematic representations of witches that have helped to shape our understanding of gender, nature, theatricality, and power.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-350WT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: GNDST-101.
Advisory: Required online application, preference to Gender Studies and Theatre Arts majors.

GNDST-392 Senior Seminar

Fall. Credits: 4

This capstone course brings seniors together to think through relationships among empirical research, theory, activism, and practice in gender studies. Majors with diverse interests, perspectives, and expertise (and other seniors with substantial background in the field) will have the opportunity to reflect on the significance of their gender studies education in relation to their current work (including work in 333s, 390, 395), their academic studies as a whole, and their plans for the future. Course readings and discussion will be shaped by students in collaboration with the instructor.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.

GNDST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.