Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society (EOS)

EOS-205 Financial Accounting

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The course, while using traditional accounting techniques and methodology, will focus on the needs of external users of financial information. The emphasis is on learning how to read, interpret, and analyze financial information as a tool to guide investment decisions. Concepts rather than procedures are stressed and class time will be largely devoted to problem solutions and case discussions. A basic knowledge of arithmetic (+,-,*,/) and a familiarity with a spreadsheet program is suggested.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Non-Liberal Arts
S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-210 Entrepreneurship: Opportunity and Impact

Fall. Credits: 4

In this foundation course, the class will select and confront four major problems from a list of possible subjects such as aging, health care, education, food and housing security, employment, poverty, sustainability and environmental health, and crime. Students will then gain ability to analyze those problems, assess the opportunities for solutions that emerge, design initial solutions, and configure organizations that allow for the implementation of those solutions. The course will utilize texts, short lectures and discussions, video, guest presentations, in-class ideation exercises, and development of analytical skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
R. Feldman

EOS-218 Perspectives in Global Business

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will study the behavior of consumers, producers, and their interactions in markets. How do consumer, producer, and social welfare depend on market organization and regulatory institutions? How do competition and international trade affect consumers and firms? How do the decisions that businesses make affect employees, customers, suppliers, the community, and the environment? How do businesses make decisions about advertising and pricing? We will use case studies and microeconomic theory to explore these and other questions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Schmeiser

EOS-220 Non-Profit Business Practice

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the issues and challenges of leading a non-profit organization. Covered topics include dealing with boards, workers and volunteers and external agencies. We will consider funding and revenue sources as well as cost management. Finally, the course will explore strategic planning and program evaluation. The course will feature an embedded practitioner with substantial leadership experience in higher education.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Robinson
Notes: The course will be a case study based course and students will be required to do a substantial project on a non-profit of their choosing.

EOS-229 Social Impact Enterprise and Innovation

Spring. Credits: 4

Project-based course in which students working in teams will create, from idea to start-up, social impact ventures (not-for-profit or for-profit), while learning applied design thinking and lean startup methods, market planning, customer and stakeholder development, finances, organization configurations, social impact analysis, business development, collaboration building, and team-building and leadership. Literature covering entrepreneurship, women in business, social impact, economic impact, and opportunity analysis will be introduced and applied. Course is particularly useful for students involved in CGI-U, Davis Projects for Peace, and their own ventures.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman

EOS-239 Organizations and Finance

Spring. Credits: 4

Engaging directly with all forms of non-governmental organizations including L3C, LLC, B-Corporations, not-for-profits, and the classic "C" and "S" corporations, students will learn about the various organizational structures, their financing, and their financial management. This will be an experiential and project-based class: students will have hands-on learning through real organizations, cases and projects, with short classroom lectures. Students will work in in teams, and teams will present analysis and reflections. Topics covered will also include requirements and regulations, economic and social impacts of organization types on markets, labor, public policy, and social good.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive
R. Feldman

EOS-249 Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Business

Spring. Credits: 4

What are the special challenges of obligation and responsibility that individuals, businesses and other organizations face in a complex global environment? We explore these questions using applied philosophical ethics from the traditional approaches to moral philosophy (studying the ethical character of both actions themselves and the results of those actions) and the more recent ethics of care. We apply these ethical considerations in different cases and contexts of individual decision-making and the choices and dilemmas that businesses and other organizations face.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-260EB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. White

EOS-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Instructor permission required.

EOS-299 Topic

EOS-299BU Topic: 'Is Business Moral?'

Spring. Credits: 4

Is engaging in business a moral activity? Is virtuous business activity that which is inherently virtuous or that which benefits society? Are there moral obligations surrounding how workers are treated? Is the ability of business to elevate our material standard of living a good thing? Through reading the Great Books of Western Civilization, we will look at what philosophers and novelists argued about business ethics starting with Athens and Jerusalem, proceeding through the English Financial Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, and into contemporary society. Authors will include Aquinas, Mandeville, Dickens, Thoreau, Dreiser, Shaw, and Wolfe.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Hartley

EOS-299MK Topic: 'International Marketing'

Fall. Credits: 4

The course introduces students to international marketing. The students will be able to understand, research, evaluate and implement international marketing and sales concepts. In particular they will be able to develop an holistic perspective on international marketing, master the marketing management process in an international context, use strategic instruments in an international environment and develop and implement international marketing strategies and marketing instruments. In class, case studies will be explored alone and in groups.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
B. Dietz

EOS-299ND Topic: 'Individuals and Organizations'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course focuses on individual and small-group behavior in the organizational setting. The basic objective is to increase knowledge and understanding of human behavior in organizations - especially each individual's own behavior. Three types of knowledge are stressed: (1) intellectual information regarding human behavior in an organizational context; (2) understanding of oneself as a person and as a leader; and (3) behavioral skills in dealing with people.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-212
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
T. Butterfield
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-310 Entrepreneurship: Social and Economic Impact in Practice

Fall. Credits: 4

Students will develop problem-solving opportunities by fully designing and creating real-world solutions and organizations for implementing those solutions. Students will learn by applying the Lean Launchpad methodology developed at Stanford University and adapted by hundreds of organizations. Students will shape entrepreneurial (including social impact) opportunities and assess financial feasibility, while living an entrepreneurial experience. This experience includes forming teams, creating business models, talking with partners and customers, assessing feasibility, while launching a new venture or initiative.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
R. Feldman
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

EOS-349 Topic

EOS-349GE Topic: 'International Management and Gender'

Fall. Credits: 4

In a globalized world with increasing gender diversity and a shortage of a talented working force, business leaders have to manage cultural, ethical and gender difference. The course will look at the construction of social roles and stereotypes, as well as the barriers, obstacles, and biases that hinder women to make it to the top, and the instruments to manage gender diversity. The class will also discuss the competitive advantages and the downsides of diversity for an organization. There will be readings of pivotal articles, individual and group work as well as discussions in class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
B. Dietz
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

EOS-349RG Topic: 'Sociology of Organizations'

Spring. Credits: 4

Sociology of Organizations introduces concepts of institution, organization, network, role and system. These ideas are at the heart of the classical sociological enterprise. They open up questions of social scale and social context by drawing attention to the level of action between individuals and abstract global systems. Using case studies, students will engage the question of ethical action in a complex world marked by competing rationalities. Using resources from class readings, students will be asked to research an organization of which they are a member to develop their own case study.

Crosslisted as: SOCI-316RG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
E. Townsley
Prereq: SOCI-123.

EOS-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

Instructor permission required.