Russian and Eurasian Studies (RES)

Taught in Russian

RES-101 Elementary Russian

Fall. Credits: 4

The four-skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) introduction to the Russian Language with the focus on communicative skills development. Major structural topics include pronunciation and intonation, all six cases, basic conjugation patterns, and verbal aspect. By the end of the course the students will be able to initiate and sustain conversation on basic topics, write short compositions, read short authentic texts and comprehend their meaning, develop an understanding of the Russian culture through watching films and listening to songs.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
S. Nazarova
Coreq: RES-101L.

RES-102 Elementary Russian

Spring. Credits: 4

Continuation of Russian 101. A four-skills course, with increasing emphasis on reading and writing, that completes the study of basic grammar. Major topics include: predicting conjugation patterns, un-prefixed and prefixed verbs of motion, complex sentences, time expressions, and strategies of vocabulary building. Students watch Russian films, read and discuss authentic texts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Kogel
Prereq: RES-101. Coreq: RES-102L.

RES-201 Intermediate Russian

Fall. Credits: 4

In-depth review of grammar topics and expansion of vocabulary with the goal of developing communicative proficiency. Readings include short stories, poetry, and newspaper articles. Students watch Russian films and discuss them orally and in writing. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
S. Nazarova
Prereq: RES-101.

RES-202 Intermediate Russian

Spring. Credits: 4

Emphasis on increasing active command of grammar while focusing on conversational topics. Readings include poetry, short stories, and magazine and newspaper articles. Students watch and discuss Russian films. Classes are conducted mostly in Russian.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Nazarova
Prereq: RES-201.

RES-251 Advanced Russian

Spring. Credits: 4

This course aims at expansion of students' vocabulary and improvement of both writing and speaking skills. The course is intended for students who have completed at least four semesters of Russian or the equivalent. Heritage learners of Russian (those who speak the language) will also benefit from the course. With a strong emphasis on integrating vocabulary in context, this course aims to help students advance their lexicon and grammar, increase fluency, and overcome speaking inhibitions. We will read and discuss a variety of texts including short stories, films, and articles.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
S. Nazarova
Advisory: RES-202 or equivalent experience.

Taught in English

RES-210 Great Books: The Literature of Nineteenth-Century Russia

Fall. Credits: 4

In no other culture has literature occupied the central role it enjoyed in nineteenth-century Russia. Political, social, and historical constraints propelled Russian writers into the roles of witness, prophet, and sage. Yet, far from being limited to the vast, dark 'Big Question' novels of legend, Russian literature offers much humor, lyricism, and fantasy. We will focus on the Russian novel as a reaction to western European forms of narrative and consider the recurring pattern of the strong heroine and the weak hero. Authors will include: Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Scotto
Notes: Taught in English

RES-211 Topics in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature

RES-211DZ Topics in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature: 'Doctor Zhivago: A Poet in History'

Spring. Credits: 4

Combining epic sweep with lyrical intensity, Doctor Zhivago is a great writer's look back at a turbulent epoch in his country's history. Set in Russia's revolutionary years, Boris Pasternak's novel is a testament to the survival of life, love, art -- and the possibility of freedom even under the most difficult conditions. This course will situate a close reading of Pasternak's novel within the various contexts (biographical, political, literary) relevant to understanding this major, but sometimes mysterious, work of Russian fiction.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Scotto
Notes: Taught in English

RES-211TW Topics in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature: Found in Translation: Rediscovered Gems of Twentieth Century Russian Literature'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The work of a new generation of talented translators has brought to light hidden treasures of twentieth and twenty-first century Russian literature. From the memoirs of a Russian woman fleeing the chaos of the 1917 Revolution (Teffi), to a slapstick hunt for czarist diamonds hidden in the stuffing of a chair a chair (Ilf and Petrov), to a writer caught in the infinitely expanding space of his apartment (Krizhanovsky) to the tales told by beautiful young werefox, this course will sample some of those discoveries. Something for everyone and fun for all!

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Scotto
Notes: Taught in English

RES-231 Anna Karenina and Contexts

RES-231FA Anna Karenina and Contexts: 'Tolstoy on Love, Death, and Family Life'

Spring. Credits: 4

Anna Karenina (1873) is one of a series of important works Tolstoy wrote pondering love, death, the nature of happiness, and the foundations of family life. Our reading of Anna Karenina will be the centerpiece of this course which will also include works ranging from Childhood (1852) to The Kreutzer Sonata (1889), which shocked and repelled readers with its unsparing depictions of human sexuality and murderous jealousy. Film versions of works will be screened.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Scotto
Notes: Taught in English

RES-240 Contemporary Russian Politics: From Lenin to Putin

Fall. Credits: 4

Russia was transformed by communist revolution into a global superpower that challenged the dominant ideologies of liberalism and nationalism. It became a powerful alternative to capitalism. In 1991, this imperial state collapsed and underwent an economic, political, and cultural revolution. What explains the Soviet Union's success for 70 years and its demise in 1991? What sort of country is Russia as it enters the twenty-first century? Is it a democracy? How has Russia's transformation affected ordinary people and Russia's relationship to the West?

Crosslisted as: POLIT-209
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Jones
Notes: Taught in English

RES-241 Russia, the West, and the Challenge of Putinism

Spring. Credits: 4

Since its creation at the beginning of the twentieth century, the Soviet Union dominated the minds of Western foreign policymakers. None of the West's policies in the Middle East, the Third World, Europe, or China after World War II can be understood without the study of Soviet foreign policy. We will examine the development of Soviet foreign policy since 1917 and, following the collapse of the USSR in 1991, the role played by Russia and Russia and the former Soviet republics in the far more complex and multipolar 'New World Order.' What should U.S. policy be toward the emerging new states of the Baltics, Central Asia, and Caucasia?

Crosslisted as: POLIT-264
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Jones
Notes: Taught in English

RES-330 Nationalism, Populism, and the New World Order

Spring. Credits: 4

Nationalism is one of the greatest challenges to multiethnic states. They have had to create new strategies to deal with the demands of ethnic minorities. Taking the four states of Spain, Canada, Russia, and the former Yugoslavia as examples, we will focus on nationalist movements within these states and the central governments' responses. What has been the effect of the Communist legacy? Are there alternatives to federalism as a way of managing national claims? What socioeconomic policies have governments used to control ethnic tensions? What role can international organizations play in finding solutions to ethnic conflict?

Crosslisted as: POLIT-308
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Jones
Prereq: 8 credits in politics, international relations, or Russian and Eurasian studies.

Independent Study

RES-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

RES-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.