Neuroscience and Behavior (NEURO)

NEURO-100 Introduction to Neuroscience and Behavior

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This comprehensive survey course explores the brain and the biological basis of behavior. We will examine the anatomy of the nervous system and the unique properties of the cells that make up the brain. We will discuss the mechanisms by which individual brain cells communicate with each other, and how small networks of cells underlie more complex processes such as perception, learning, and behavior. In labs, students will perform experiments that expand upon and reinforce these ideas through hands-on exercises.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
K. Colodner, J. Roche
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: NEURO-100L.

NEURO-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

NEURO-309 Topics in Neuroscience and Behavior

NEURO-309SP Topics in Neuroscience and Behavior: 'Synaptic Plasticity: Synaptic Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory'

Spring. Credits: 4

Much of what is currently known of memory is thought to involve synaptic modifications on both short and long time scales in a region of the brain called the hippocampus. This course will look at the experimental attempts to understand learning and memory. Students will utilize critical analysis of primary literature in order to gain a broad understanding of the historical underpinnings of the field as well as the most recent advances. Primary research papers will be analyzed and discussed, covering topics that include invertebrate memory models, long term potentiation in the mammalian hippocampus, synaptic tagging, and place cells of the hippocampus.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Roche
Prereq: NEURO-100 or BIOL-230.

NEURO-324 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will explore cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system development and function through lectures, laboratory exercises, and the critical analysis of primary literature. Topics include synapse formation and synaptic transmission, neuronal-glial interactions, the molecular basis of behavior, and applied genetic engineering techniques.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
K. Colodner
Prereq: NEURO-100 and BIOL-230 (or BIOL-220).
Notes: This course meets the 300-level laboratory-based course requirement for the Neuroscience and Behavior major.

NEURO-331 Glial Cells in Health and Disease

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will explore the "other" cells in your brain, the glial cells. While neuronal cells receive most of the attention, glial cells are now recognized as essential players in normal brain physiology. Through the critical analysis of primary literature, we will highlight recent advances in glial cell biology and discuss how the various glial cell subtypes (astrocytes, microglia, myelinating cells, etc.) contribute to the healthy and diseased brain. We will examine the glial contribution to a variety of disorders (e.g. multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) as we cultivate a better understanding of these often overlooked brain cells.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
K. Colodner
Prereq: NEURO-100 and BIOL-230.

NEURO-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.