International Relations (IR)

IR-200 Research Methods

Spring. Credits: 4

Develops students' skills in writing expository essays and introduces basic quantitative and qualitative research methods used in the social sciences and history. The course provides a foundation for writing research papers in advanced courses, as well as an honors thesis.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Houston
Notes: This course should be taken by International Relations majors in their sophomore year.

IR-211 Middle East Politics

Fall. Credits: 4

Introduction to the cultures and politics of the Middle East. Includes the situation of the region at the time of the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire; the emergence of independent states before and after World War II; the rise of Arab and Zionist nationalism; the Arab-Israeli conflicts; and the superpower rivalry and its influence on regional politics. Other topics include the Iranian revolution, the domestic and regional role of Islamic movements, and the political economy of oil.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-222 The United States, Israel, and the Arabs

Spring. Credits: 4

Surveys the constants and variables in U.S. foreign policy toward Israel and the Arabs since the end of World War II to the present. Analysis of domestic determinants of U.S. policy, including lobbies, ideology, and the international system. Consideration of U.S. policy in the Arab-Israeli conflict, intra-Arab disputes, and the Gulf War.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-224 The United States and Iran

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Explores America's relationship with Iran from the end of World War II to the present. Examines America's close ties to the Shah and the political, social, and economic causes of the Iranian revolution, with emphasis on the role of Shi'ite Islam. Concludes with analysis of politics and society in the Islamic Republic under Khomeini and his successors.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-237 International Human Rights

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of, and issues in, international human rights. Prior to World War II, there was very little focus on the question of human rights within the international system and within the discipline of international relations. Since that time we have seen a significant expansion of human rights theory, practice, and institutions. This course outlines the historical ideational and institutional developments of human rights. It exposes students to a range of theoretical propositions and empirical findings to understand the role (and limits) of human rights in the international system today.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Western
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-250 Topics in International Relations

IR-250EP Topics in International Relations: 'International Environmental Politics'

Fall. Credits: 4

Environmental problems are also political problems. We will learn about why environmental problems exist and persist, what the international community of states, NGOs and firms does to address them and how effectively their efforts improve environmental quality. During the course we will talk about the ethical relationship between humans and the environment. Students will gain different perspectives on how humans should interact with their environment, a rich knowledge of the facts of environmental governance, and concepts that they can use to analyze environmental governance and normatively evaluate how it effects economic activity and political participation for people all around the world.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-248EP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Heilman
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

IR-305 International Society

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An intensive reading course in theories of international society: the idea that states and peoples are or should be linked to each other through a web of shared values and institutions. It focuses on the work of Hedley Bull, Immanuel Kant, and John Rawls. How did these three men understand international society? What are or should be the values and institutions that give rise to it and support it? What implications do their visions of international society have for war and peace, state sovereignty, religion, democracy, capitalism, distributive justice, human rights, and international law? What responses and criticisms have their arguments engendered?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-323 Comparative Politics of the Middle East

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course presents the rise (and sometimes collapse) of modern states in the Middle East; the nature of legitimacy, modernization, state-civil society relations, and political culture and economy; and the role of religion with specific reference to Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Turkey.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: 8 credits in Politics or International Relations, including POLIT-106 or IR-211.

IR-324 Islamic Political Thought

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines Islamic political thought from the origins of Islam to the present. It considers how Muslim thinkers over the past 14 centuries have understood such fundamental political concepts as the state, leadership, and law. The seminar also includes modern Muslim reflections on political concepts of Western origin, such as democracy, nationalism, and civil society.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116 and 8 credits in IR or POLIT.

IR-337 International Human Rights Advocacy in Theory and Practice

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines how and why international human rights norms, laws, and institutions have emerged and how they are influencing global politics. We will examine closely the practices and influences of human rights advocacy organizations and the major international human rights political and judicial institutions. Students will be introduced to legal and political theories, advocacy strategies, and media technologies as well as a broad range of analytical approaches to evaluating advocacy campaigns. This class is linked (we share several class sessions and a final project) with Spanish 340: The Other in the Media: New Media and Otherness in the Americas.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Western
Prereq: IR-237.

IR-341 Political Islam

Fall. Credits: 4

This course covers Islamic responses to European imperialism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly the emergence of Islamic modernism; the growth of Islamic movements in the Arab world and South Asia and their responses to secular nationalism and socialism; and a survey of the ends to which religion is applied in three types of regimes: patrimonial Saudi Arabia, revolutionary Iran, and military-authoritarian Pakistan.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-343 Law and Religion

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the relationship between law and religion through a comparative study of eight countries: the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, Israel, and India. It focuses on the role of religion in the constitutional law of these countries, both in the text of constitutional documents and in judicial interpretation of these texts. Starting with an analysis of the religion clauses in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, the seminar explores questions relating to the separation of religion and state, religious liberty, and the proper role of courts in negotiating societal disputes over religion.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116.

IR-348 The Instrument of the Curious: Photography as Social Exploration

Spring. Credits: 4

When thoughtfully and responsibly employed, the photographic craft affords practitioners a passport to the world; an excuse to closely explore issues and spaces of interest. This course uses photography to examine relationships between conflict, masculine gender, and broader social order. By drawing on the extensive body of work of the instructor, a photojournalist who has contributed to National Geographic Magazine and other leading outlets, as well as fiction and non-fiction readings, it aims to illustrate the connection between academic concepts and modern storytelling. Thematically, the course will focus largely on issues of masculinity, violence, and contemporary armed conflict.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
P. Muller
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in international relations.

IR-350 Advanced Topics in International Relations

IR-365 Ethics and International Relations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Do ethical considerations matter in international relations? Should they? These questions are examined from the perspective of Western writers on these specific issues: just war, intervention, human rights, weapons of mass destruction, and distributive justice. The course also considers challenges to the international system posed by the critiques and responses of non-Western states and peoples.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Hashmi
Prereq: POLIT-116 and 8 credits from International Relations.

IR-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.