History (HIST)

100-Level Regional Surveys

HIST-111 The Making of the Modern Middle East

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Survey of the factors shaping principal political, economic, and social life in the Middle East and North Africa from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Topics will include but are not limited to: the integration of the Middle East into the world economy; the advent of imperialism and colonialism; the reforms of the nineteenth century; the transition from empires to nation-states; the World Wars and state formation; the rise of nationalisms and the consolidation of the state; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the role of the United States in the Middle East; and finally the most recent Arab uprisings.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Sbaiti

HIST-115 The Medieval World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the cultural, intellectual, religious, and material contours of the period commonly described as 'medieval', extending roughly from the reorganization of the Roman state in the fifth century to the fourteenth century CE. While historians often emphasize the divisions and dislocations wrought by religious, linguistic, and cultural difference, there also were important continuities and similarities between the societies around, and on either side of, the Mediterranean Sea. These complex relationships will serve as the basis of our discussions and readings, focusing on both primary documents in translation as well as important historiographic perspectives on the period.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-124 History of Modern South Asia, 1700 to the Present

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will explore the history of South Asia between the eighteenth century and the present. Using a combined chronological and thematic approach and against a historical canvas that engages such diverse issues as gender, political economy, conquest, resistance, state formation, economic exploitation, national liberation, and identity politics, the aim of this course is to interrogate the impact of British colonialism and South Asian nationalisms on the state, society, and people of the subcontinent. Using primary and secondary sources, we will address both the most significant historical moments of modern South Asian history and the historiographical debates that surround them.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. S. Datla

HIST-128 Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A survey of the political, social, and cultural history of Rome from the Republic to the Empire, down to the early fourth century with the rise of Constantine. We shall strive to recreate the entire experience of the peoples of the Rome and those that came in contact with it as it rose to become the dominant power in the Mediterranean: their history, war, trade and technology, religion, republican government and imperial administration, slavery, economics and the Roman family. Special emphasis will be given to the growth of Rome and its empire. Sources include Polybius, Sallust, Livy, Suetonius, Tacitus, Seneca, Plutarch, and others.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-228
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-130 History of China through 1600

Spring. Credits: 4

A survey of the social, political, and cultural world of premodern China. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution and contrasts of elite and popular culture and the nature of change in an agrarian state. Readings will be drawn from Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist traditions, classical poetry and fiction, and the history of social and political movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wu
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-137 Modern East Asia, 1600-2000

Fall. Credits: 4

A comparative history of China, Japan, and Korea from the early seventeenth century to the present, with strong focus on regional interaction. After an introduction to early modern histories and cultures, we will examine the struggles of these countries to preserve or regain their independence and establish their national identities in a rapidly changing, often violent modern world order. While each of these countries has its own distinctive identity, their overlapping histories (and dilemmas) give the region a coherent shape. We will also look at how individuals respond to and are shaped by larger historical movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wu
Notes: No prior knowledge of East Asian history or the languages is required, and readings are all in English.

HIST-138 Modern Jewish History

Fall. Credits: 4

A history of the Jews from the 16th century to the present. Jews--a small group, lacking a stable geographical or political center--played a remarkably central role in world events. Jewish history exemplifies questions of tolerance, intolerance, and diversity in the Modern Age. From Europe to the Americas to the Middle East, Jewish history witnessed constant interchange between the non-Jewish world and its Jewish subcultures. We will examine a variety of Jewish encounters with the modern world: integration, assimilation, anti-Semitism, and Jewish nationalism. The course will also contextualize the Holocaust, and the establishment of the State of Israel, as well as contemporary Jewish life.

Crosslisted as: JWST-138
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Gordon

HIST-151 Modern and Contemporary Europe

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Surveys the major movements and developments in Europe during the era of European expansion and dominance--from the devastations of the Thirty Years War to the Second World War--and up to the current era of European Union. Topics include: the French Revolution and the birth of nationalism; the scientific and industrial revolutions; the modern history of international relations; imperialism, fascism, the Holocaust, the two World Wars, and the present and potential roles of Europe at the dawn of the twenty-first century.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Fitz-Gibbon, C. Roeder

HIST-155 History of Modern Britain, 1688 to the Present

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Britain has long been considered an exemplary modern nation, credited, for example, with the world's first industrial economy, modern institutions of representative politics, a vibrant public sphere, a powerful war and welfare state, and one of the largest empires in world history. Using a combination of primary and secondary source readings, classroom lectures and discussions, and various written assessments, this course will ask how modern imperial Britain was made and how this history relates to the broader currents of world history.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Fitz-Gibbon

HIST-161 British Empire and Commonwealth

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the expansion, consolidation, and eventual disintegration of the modern British Empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will examine this history with an eye to understanding the causes of empire, and its effects. Themes include formal and informal imperialism, the emergence of anti-colonial nationalism, the roles of gender and culture, and the legacies of British colonialism. We will discuss British attitudes and policies toward empire, and toward particular colonies, what role empire played in the growth of the British economy, in short, how colonial ideologies and practices were shaped and in turn affected vast regions of the globe.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. S. Datla

HIST-170 The American Peoples to 1865

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the diverse cultures and peoples--Indian, African, and European--that from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, through combat and cooperation, forged North American societies. Topics include the indigenous societies of the Americas; the age of colonialism; slavery; the American Revolution; the creation of the American political system; expansion and industrialization; and the coming of the Civil War.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. DeLucia
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-171 The American Peoples Since 1865

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces the history of the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Our themes include the nation's relationship to the world; the evolution of racial, gendered, and class hierarchies; the transformation of the federal government; and the changing forms of domestic life, work, consumer capitalism, politics, social protest, and cultural expression. How have the people of the United States struggled over such values as freedom, equality, prosperity, and progress? How have ideas about citizenship, manhood, and motherhood served to police the boundaries of national belonging? We will be concerned throughout with the role of storytelling in history.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda

HIST-180 Introduction to Latin American Cultures

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Examines the confrontation, assimilation, and transformation of Amerindian, African, and European cultures in Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present. Focuses on the processes in which distinctive self-images emerged in the region and how these images have been challenged and changed over time. Uses films, literature, and folk traditions to complement scholarly analysis of the emergence of a New World mentality.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-180
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

200-Level Courses: Themes and Periods

HIST-204 Issues in Islamic History

HIST-206 African Cities: Development Dreams and Nightmares in the Twentieth Century

Spring. Credits: 4

African cities demonstrate the failure of models of development with the aim and ideal of industrialization. This course examines the empty promises of modernity through the lens of African urban history using fiction, film, and city archives. Beginning with Timbuctu and Cairo, the course explores the emergence and decline of trade entrepots, the rise of colonial cities, and the dilemmas of postcolonial economies and polities. Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, Kampala, Kinshasa, Harare, Johannesburg, Lagos, Accra, and Dakar are among the cities studied. Designed for those seeking only an introduction to development as well as those with further ambitions, it assumes no previous knowledge of Africa.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-206
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Hanson

HIST-214 History of Global Inequality

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Why are some nations so much richer and more powerful than others? This course demonstrates that global inequality is not natural; it has a history. Exploring patterns of exchange that developed among regions of the world over the past 600 years, we will ask about the role of power in the establishment of practices of production and exchange. We will explore how cross-regional productive systems benefited some participants at the expense of others. Having traced the consequences of unequal exchange over several centuries, we will ask how global trade and production would have to change for all participants to benefit equally. The course includes a community-based learning component.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

HIST-222 Muslim Politics in Modern South Asia

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Taken together, Muslims in South Asia constitute the largest population of Muslims worldwide. This course will serve as an introduction to the political history of this diverse group of people. We will begin by considering religious conversion and the rule of Muslim kings in the premodern period. The bulk of the course will, however, concentrate on the modern history of the subcontinent, and especially on events and themes that continue to influence the countries and peoples of South Asia in the present, such as Muslim social reform, the rise of communalism, the partition of the subcontinent, and the influence of religion on contemporary politics.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. S. Datla

HIST-223 Religion and Politics in Modern India

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The history of India has been singled out for its complex intermingling of religion and politics. This course will explore the constitution of religious identities in two of India's largest religious communities: Hindu and Muslim. Focusing primarily on the colonial period, we will discuss religious reform movements, communal violence, mass politics, and the partition of the subcontinent into the independent states of India and Pakistan. Throughout we will be interested in the ways that the colonial experience affected the religious thought and practice of Indians. Finally, we will explore the meanings of this history for the postcolonial workings of democracy and secularism in modern India.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-223
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. S. Datla

HIST-224 The Busy Silk Roads: Cultural Exchange in Pre-modern Eurasia

Fall. Credits: 4

Centered on great powers in the web of the Silk Roads prior to the nineteenth century, this course seeks to present a history of incessant communication at a trans-regional level. Three vast empires dominated the heart of the Eurasian continent: the Tibetan empire (7th-9th centuries), the Mongol empire (1206-1370), and the Manchu Qing (1644-1911). Each of them cultivated and encouraged cultural exchanges in the landlocked regions that are now divided into many modern nation-states. Important questions include: is seaborne trade the only form of global circulation of knowledge? What roles did the great powers play in facilitating exchange and communication?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Wu
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement; all readings are in English

HIST-226 Bread and Circuses: The Politics of Public Entertainment in Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Bread and circuses" (panem et circenses) was a catchphrase in the Roman empire that described the political strategy of controlling an unruly populace through free bread and public entertainment. Against a backdrop of Roman social and political institutions, this course focuses on the imperial ideology, aristocratic ethos, and cultural practices that underpinned this catchphrase, as well as questions concerning the careers of entertainers--gladiators, charioteers, and actors--who were at once celebrities and social outcasts; the rules of spectatorship at the games; the use of these games as a form of social control; and the logistics of feeding the city population.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-226
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

HIST-227 Ancient Greece

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will trace the emergence and expansion of Greek civilization in the Mediterranean between the Bronze Age and Alexander the Great. Among themes to be explored are political structures, trade, slavery, gender relations, and religion, as well as the contributions of ancient Greeks to literary genres (drama, rhetoric, historiography, philosophy) and to the visual arts. Throughout we will consider how the history of the ancient Greeks can speak to modern concerns. Sources will include works of ancient Greek literature and history (e.g., Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch) as well as archaeological and epigraphic evidence.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-227
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Debnar
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-228 Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Ancient Rome and its empire can be viewed both as a measure of human achievement and a cautionary tale of the corrupting effects of unbridled power. This course covers the history of Ancient Rome from its mythologized beginnings (753 BCE) to the rise and spread of Christianity under the Emperor Constantine (312 CE). Topics include the creation and development of Rome's republican form of government as well as its eventual transition to monarchy, the causes and consequences of the acquisition of empire, the role of the army in administering the provinces and defending the frontiers, the image of emperor, the economy, and religion.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-228
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

HIST-229 The Tyrant and the Gladiator: Bad Roman Emperors from Caligula to Commodus

Spring. Credits: 4

Caligula was a god (or so he thought); Nero fiddled while Rome burned; Commodus dressed as a gladiator and fought man and beast in the arena. The history of the Roman empire is replete with scandalous stories about eccentric and even insane emperors whose reigns raise questions about the nature of the emperor's power and his role in administering the empire. In this course a close study of Roman imperial biography and historiography--the source of so many of these stories of bad emperors--will be weighed against documentary and archaeological evidence in order to reveal the dynamic between the emperor, his court, and his subjects that was fundamental to the political culture of imperial Rome.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-229
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-230 History and Law

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the study of history through law, using a comparative approach to group rights. Case studies, rooted in landmark court decisions and legislation, concern racial segregation in America before the civil rights era ('separate but equal') and in Europe during the Nazi era (the Nuremberg Laws, German 'national groups' in the East), as well as affirmative action in America and attempts at promoting equality among national groups in Austria before the First World War.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King

HIST-232 Special Topics in Medieval History

HIST-232EN Special Topics in Medieval History: 'Medieval and Early Modern England'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An exploration, through close reading of primary sources and historiography, of English history from the late Roman period to the eve of the English Revolution, focusing upon the mutually formative relationship between England and its neighbors, both within and outside the British Isles, the development and formative role within English society of Christianity, both as an institution and as a body of beliefs and behaviors, and the shifting institutions, actors, and practices that made up English political life.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

HIST-232RW Special Topics in Medieval History: 'God Save the Queen: Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will explore female rulership in Europe from the late Roman empire to the age of Elizabeth I. Our discussion of various texts and images (most of them primary sources in translation) will reveal the role of queens within their societies, their relationship to broader social and cultural institutions such as the Christian Church, and the ways in which queens were celebrated, criticized, and imagined by writers and artists of their time.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-232SL Special Topics in Medieval History: 'Sex, Love, and Marriage in Medieval and Early Modern Europe'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the relationships of passion, obligation, and love that bound men and women over the course of nearly two millennia, from Rome in the first century B.C.E. to sixteenth-century France. In particular, we focus on the formal ways in which those relationships were organized under the rubric of 'marriage', on the social roles created by that institution, on the relationship (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion, and the role of homosocial and homosexual desire within that history.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

HIST-234 The Atlantic World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Early Americans inhabited an interconnected world through which people, beliefs, and objects circulated. This course explores the 'Atlantic World' as both a place and a concept: an ocean surrounded by diverse communities and empires, and an imagined space of shared or competing affiliations. Moving from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century, it examines ecological, cultural, political, economic, intellectual, and religious exchanges among Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans. It will introduce both conceptual dimensions of this Atlantic paradigm and case studies that investigate its human subtleties, with the goal of examining early American history through a transnational lens.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-235 Native American History through 1865

Spring. Credits: 4

This course surveys Native American history from ancient times through the U.S. Civil War, tracing the ways that tribal communities have shaped North America. Beginning with the diverse indigenous societies that inhabited the Americas millennia before Columbus's arrival, it discusses the cultural complexity of Native peoples, nations, and worldviews rooted in particular ecosystems and homelands. It moves through the early modern era of European scientific exploration and 'discovery' of a New World, and the pivotal violences of the 'Indian Wars' of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-237
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-238 The Qing Empire

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The most populous contiguous state on earth, the Qing Empire ruled much of East Asia for nearly 300 years (1636-1912). Its 17th and 18th century conquests created the shape and extent of modern China. Its powerful commercial economy and skillful artisans drew merchants from all over the world to its great trading cities. This course will survey the Qing's rule, focusing on the Manchu military and political elite, the enormous and diverse population over which it ruled, and the international contexts of its rise, flourishing, and fall. Students will read works of the 'New Qing History,' as well as primary sources, and will undertake both group and individual research projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department

HIST-239 Topics in Asian History

HIST-240 The Holocaust in History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An attempt at understanding the Nazi-led assault on Europe's Jews. Course units include an exploration of origins, both German and European; an analysis of the evolving mechanics of genocide (mobile killing squads, death camps, etc.); comparisons (Germany proper vs. Poland, the Holocaust vs. other instances of state-sponsored mass murder); legal dimensions; and an introduction to the politics of Holocaust remembrance since 1945.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King

HIST-244 European Public Policy, West and East

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In 1968, the USSR terminated the Prague Spring, and commenced a strategy of consumerist depoliticization in its European satellites. Around the same time, states on the other side of the Iron Curtain saw the postwar 'miracle' of rapid economic growth and social consensus come to an end. This course, reaching across the revolutionary break of 1989 up to the present, raises questions of convergence and continuity in European public policy, West and East. Paired case studies from a variety of countries in fields such as energy and the environment, minority rights, and housing serve to clarify evolving rules and patterns to the policy-making game, from Cold War to European Union.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King

HIST-248 Science, Revolution, and Modernity

Spring. Credits: 4

Introduces critical analysis of science and technology by tracing the historiography of the Scientific Revolution. The significance of this extended intellectual episode has been assessed in radically different ways throughout the intervening centuries. As such, it provides a fertile ground on which to pose and answer important questions about science and its role in society. What does it mean to regard science as 'revolutionary'? How are scientific developments shaped by, and how do they shape, the social, economic, and political worlds in which they are embedded? How is our contemporary understanding of science and technology influenced by the stories we tell about the past?

Crosslisted as: CST-248
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Cotter
Restrictions: This course is limited to the sophomore and junior classes.
Notes: Gateway course for minor in Conceptual Foundations of Science

HIST-251 The City and Economic Life in Modern South Asia

Spring. Credits: 4

One-third of South Asia's population, or approximately 500 million people, currently live and work in cities. This course explores the history of urban life in the subcontinent from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. Cities have long been sites of economic opportunity, but also of profound inequality. They offer a unique spatial perspective on large-scale transformations such as industrialization and globalization. The course addresses the ongoing challenges of mass urbanization, especially the negotiation of ethnic, class, gender, and religious differences. Readings drawn from history, anthropology, and urban studies accompany literary and visual primary sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Raianu

HIST-252 History of Money and Finance

Spring. Credits: 4

What is money? Is it the same in all times and places? If money could speak, what stories would it tell of the past? This course is about the history of money and money as an object of history. Using primary and secondary sources, students will learn about the social, political and cultural meaning of money at different times in the history of the western world. In addition, students will interpret the history of money using a variety of coins and money-related objects held in the MHC Art Museum. This is a course on the history of money, not the economics of money, but it will be of interest to anyone curious to learn more about the meaning of money in the past and today.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon

HIST-254 Doubt, Dissent, and Heresy in the Age of the Inquisition

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The Holy Office of the Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church proved an effective instrument for controlling religious and political orthodoxy from the Middle Ages through the early modern era. Its range of activity spanned investigations into doctrinal purity, groups of dissenters, Jews and Muslims who converted to the Christian faith, scientific discoveries, witchcraft, cunning folk, the black arts, and popular dissent. This course examines this institution and the social political, mental, and imaginary world it monitored to safeguard 'faith and morals' in this life and access to salvation in the next.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-255 Ideas and Society in Modern Europe

HIST-256 Environmental History

HIST-256HC Environmental History: 'The Columbian Exchange: Global Perspectives on History, Culture, and Nature, 1492 to 1914'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Studies the material and cultural consequences of the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the interconnecting of Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas. Topics include the expansion of globalizing trade networks, empire building, the expansion of agriculture and industry, environmental change, and differing ideas of nature in different cultures as expressed in historical documents, art, and literature. Readings include Charles Mann, 1493: Uncovering the new World Columbus Created, and Mary Shelley, Frankenstein.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-257 Research Methods in History, Environmental Change, and Public Health

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to interdisciplinary research methods in history, social science, and the digital humanities, using environmental change and public health as themes for investigation. Topics include the collection, organization, and analysis of information from on-line databases and research collections as well as bibliographic management. Computer-assisted analysis of textual information and GIS will be introduced to study agricultural change, industrialization, and public health during the 19th and early 20th centuries with data on Great Britain. Research projects for the U.S. are possible but limited by less abundant digital data on public health.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-257
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

HIST-260 Topics in the Recent History of Europe

HIST-260BK Topics in the Recent History of Europe: 'Balkan Histories in Modern Times'

Spring. Credits: 4

The Balkans, Winston Churchill famously said, "produce more history than they can consume." This course offers an introduction to the complex histories of this little-known yet diverse and fascinating part of Europe that has been subject to many myths. Starting in the eighteenth century, we will focus on the emergence of modern Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Albania and end our journey in the late twentieth century. Using a broad range of primary and secondary sources we will study historical themes such as Habsburg and Ottoman imperial rule, religion, nationalism, identity politics, social and economic transformation, ethnic conflict, and European integration.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Roeder

HIST-260CW Topics in the Recent History of Europe: 'The Cold War: Perspectives from East and West'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the social, cultural, and political history of both Western and Eastern Europe since 1945. By exploring the permeability of the "Iron Curtain," the course encourages students to critically assess conceptions of division and unity in European history. We will explore ways in which borders were both reinforced and transcended. Topics include the legacy of the Second World War, migration, science, the division of Germany and its re-unification, tourism and the experience of the "other," sport as a unifying culture, the power of media, social protest, transatlantic relations, and the end of the Cold War.

Crosslisted as: RES-244CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Roeder

HIST-260PW Topics in the Recent History of Europe: 'Postwar Societies: USSR and Eastern Europe'

Fall. Credits: 4

What was it like to be a hipster in the Soviet Union? What does rock music have to do with political dissent? This course offers a critical inquiry into the fascinating and vibrant societies of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe from 1945 to 1989, with a focus on the former. While gaining an understanding of the major political developments from late Stalinism to the end of Communism, we will explore the creative ways in which citizens of the Eastern bloc expressed their agency and initiated societal change. Using a range of primary and secondary sources, including film and literature, we will study themes such as postwar childhood, fashion, music, political dissent, and environmentalism.

Crosslisted as: RES-244PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Roeder

HIST-260TW Topics in the Recent History of Europe: 'World War I and the Making of the Twentieth Century'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

World War I (1914-1918) was arguably the transformative event of the 20th century. It destroyed four empires, enabled the Russian Revolution, reconstructed the political geography of Central Europe, strengthened independence movements in European possessions overseas, and facilitated the rise of fascism and a second world war 91939-1945). This course explores this history by examining the war's origins, nature, and manifold consequences from 1890s to 1939 in Europe and in global perspective. Readings include Vera Brittain, Testament of Youth, and Modris Eksteins, Rites of Spring. The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

HIST-262 Stalinism in Central Europe

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the use of revolutionary terror by the state. More specifically, it examines policies of terror pursued by Communist dictatorships in Hungary and Czechoslovakia during the early years of the Cold War. Who did what to whom, and why? What insights do secret police work and public propaganda, knitted together in macabre show trials, allow us into Stalinist rule, European politics, and maybe ourselves? How did memories of terror shape politics after Stalin's death? Students should deepen their understanding for the discipline of History, improve their reading and writing, and develop a working knowledge of Central European politics at the middle of the twentieth century.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King

HIST-264 German History in the Modern World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course pushes beyond cliches and simplistic images about Germans, into the world-shaping and humanity-stretching German past. Beginning with the Napoleonic Wars and the emergence of German nationalism, students will follow developments up to the present--using primary sources that range from sublime to depraved and that concern politics, literature, music, and more. Themes include the roots of Nazism and of German democracy and the responsibility of individuals for social outcomes.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King

HIST-271 Place and Power in the American West and Pacific World

Spring. Credits: 4

The vast region of North America between the Mississippi River and Pacific Ocean has been a site of many migrations, conflicts, political transformations, and environmental changes. This course examines dynamic histories of Native American tribes, Euro-American "explorers" and colonists, cowboys and miners, Asian immigrant laborers, and mariners, all of whom helped create interior and oceanic worlds. It focuses on natural and human changes in specific locales, and also explores how public histories at these places shape the present and future.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-271
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-274 Blacks in the North, Revolution to Reconstruction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Slavery existed throughout the U.S. at the time of the American Revolution; afterwards, gradual emancipation plans freed the children of the formerly enslaved in the northern states. Runaways from the South increased their numbers. These nineteenth-century African Americans built the first edifices of freedom, chiefly through the institutions of family and religion, and furnished both leaders and foot soldiers for the abolitionist movement. They acted in the hope that their efforts would end slavery and bring full citizenship for black people. We will examine their unique contributions to the history of freedom, and the many obstacles they faced as they mobilized for emancipation.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

HIST-276 U.S. Women's History Since 1890

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the major themes of U.S. women's history from the 1890s to the present. We will look both at the experiences of a diverse group of women in the U.S. as well as the ideological meaning of gender as it evolved and changed over the twentieth century. We will chart the various meanings of womanhood (for example, in relation to motherhood, work, the domestic sphere, and sexuality) along racial, ethnic, and class lines and in different regions, and will trace the impact multiple identities have had on women's activism.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-206US
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda

HIST-278 Deportation Nation: from Chinese Exclusion to World War II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on immigration will begin with in the nineteenth century with the anti-Chinese movement and proceed through to World War II. It will include an outline of the basic patterns of migration to the United States; their relationship to settler colonialism and U.S. imperialism; US racial formation; citizenship and family reunification; immigrant labor; 'illegal' immigration; and struggles for migrant justice. Throughout, we will analyze the relationships between gender, sexuality, race, class and nation, and the ways in which these become points of struggle over identity, community, and belonging.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Reddy

HIST-280 Topics in North American History

These courses examine selected topics in the history of North America. Topics to change from year to year. Some will focus exclusively on the history of the United States; others will treat North American history more broadly.

HIST-280AA Topics in North American History: 'African American Women and United States History'

Spring. Credits: 4

How is our understanding of U.S. history transformed when we place African American women at the center of the story? This course will examine the exclusion of African American women from dominant historical narratives and the challenge to those narratives presented by African American women's history through an investigation of selected topics in the field.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-241FW, GNDST-206FW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Renda

HIST-281 African American History, Precolonial to Emancipation

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the cultural, social, political, and economic history of African Americans through the Civil War. Topics covered include the African background to the African American experience, the Atlantic slave trade, introduction and development of slavery, master-slave relationships, the establishment of black communities, slave revolts, the political economy of slavery, women in slavery, the experiences of free blacks, the crisis of the nineteenth century, and the effect of the Civil War.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-241HS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-282 African American History from Emancipation to Obama

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the social, cultural, political, and economic history of African Americans from emancipation and Reconstruction through the present. Emphasis will fall on postwar southern social and economic developments, the rise of segregation, northern migrations, black class stratification, nationalism, the twentieth-century civil rights movement, and current trends in African American political, social, and economic life.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-282
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

HIST-283 Topics in the Recent History of the United States

These courses are designed for students with a background in American history who wish to focus attention on developments since the late nineteenth century.

HIST-283MC Topics in the Recent History of the United States: 'We Didn't Start the Fire: The United States Since WW II'

Fall. Credits: 4

The United States emerged from the Second World War as the most powerful nation on earth. This course explores American political, cultural, and social life in the postwar era, with an eye toward helping students gain a firmer understanding of contemporary issues and conflicts in our nation and around the world. Topics include birth of the national security state, the Cold War at home and abroad, popular culture and consumer society, the civil rights struggle, the political and cultural rebellions of the 1960s,the resurgence of conservatism, and America's changing relationship to the world in the post Cold War era. Students will have the opportunity to do a research paper on the topic of their choice.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom

HIST-283RA Topics in the Recent History of the United States: 'Reel America: History and Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the social and cultural history of the American film industry since the 1890s. The course surveys the evolution of Hollywood cinema from the silent era through the so-called classical period and through the post-World War II breakup of the studio system.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-220RA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom

HIST-286 America 1900

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An in-depth exploration of American culture, politics, and society at the turn of the twentieth century, from roughly the 1890s to World War I. Through readings, films, lectures, and discussions, we will examine several of the key transformations propelling the U.S. into the modern era: the boom and bust of industrial capitalism; the creation of legal segregation; the origins of modern mass media; the impact and experience of the New Immigration; tensions between urban and small town culture; the imperial project abroad; Progressive reform and more radical visions at home. Students will pursue 'event centered' research, using primary and secondary sources, exploring topics of their choice.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom

HIST-287 Topics in Latin American Studies

HIST-287AF Topics in Latin American Studies: 'Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility'

Spring. Credits: 4

Exploration of the history of Afro-Latin American populations since Independence within and outside the nation-state. We will question why and how to study those whose governments define them not as peoples of African descent but as part of a mixed-race majority of Hispanic cultural heritage, who themselves may often have supported this policy, and who may have had compelling reasons to avoid official scrutiny. Readings include early twentieth-century Latin American racialist theorizing; research using census, economic, criminal, and marriage records; autobiographical works, and analysis of race in textual and musical representations of peoples, regions, and nations.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-260, AFCNA-241AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

HIST-288 Modern Mexico

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An analysis of the modern Mexican nation-state organized around three major themes: the conflictive yet symbiotic relationship with the United States, from the war of the 1840s through NAFTA most recently; the succession of reformist and revolutionary upheavals in 1810-1821, 1856-1867, 1910-1917, the 1930s, and again today, seeking to resolve both problems of the colonial past and new conflicts traceable to the very reforms generated by earlier political and social struggles; and the meaning of Mexican nationality from different ethnic, gender, and class perspectives. Readings include autobiographical and literary works, historical studies, and films.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-288
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

HIST-291 Education and Development in Africa: History and Ethnographic Research Methods

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What knowledge will allow us to realize the potential of education to facilitate progress for Africa, and how do we generate that knowledge? The historical component of this course explores the deliberate use of education to hold people in servitude as well as African experiences of empowering education, and asks why the immense efforts expended on education in recent decades are not yielding prosperity for the citizens of African nations. The methods component of the class develops the core skills of ethnographic fieldwork: participant observation, interviewing, making fieldnotes and writing ethnography. We collaborate with the Springfield Renaissance School ninth grade.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

HIST-296 Women in History

HIST-296AF Women in History: 'African Women: Food and Power'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course uses archival records, fiction, film, life histories and outstanding recent scholarship to investigate African women's actions in a century that encompassed women's loss of power and authority despite their continuing centrality in food production. We study the erosion of women's autonomy and the loss of women's work of governing at conquest, in the early colonial period, and as a consequence of Africa's subordinate place in the world economy. We examine women's efforts to sustain productive activities in the face of opposition and the gendered tensions these efforts provoke. No previous Africa coursework required. Optional collaboration with African immigrants in our region.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-206AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

HIST-296ME Women in History: 'Women and Gender in the Middle East'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide students with a nuanced historical understanding of issues related to women and gender in the region defined as the area from Morocco to Iran. After an introduction to the main themes and approaches in the study of women and gender, we will examine the development of discourses on gender and the lived experiences of women from the rise of Islam, through the Ottoman Empire, and up to the twentieth century. Topics: the politics of marriage, divorce, and reproduction; women's political and economic participation; Islamist movements; the new field of masculinity studies; and the highly contested topics of homosexuality and transsexuality in the Middle East.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Sbaiti

300-Level Colloquia

HIST-301 Colloquia

HIST-301AB Colloquium: 'The Abolition Movement'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the maturation of North American slave regimes after the American Revolution and the diverse activities of people who worked to abolish slavery. The assorted motives of white opponents of slavery and the actions of both free and enslaved African Americans to achieve freedom will be highlighted. We will analyze the mechanics of biracial coalition building and assess the historical legacy of these activists for subsequent social movements.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-301
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

HIST-301EM Colloquium: 'The Age of Emancipation'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This colloquium examines the causes and the course of the Civil War, its social, economic, and political results during Reconstruction, and the early roots of both de jure segregation and the civil rights movement. It will examine the process of emancipation from the perspective of social history. Violent conflicts over free labor, the establishment of sharecropping, and the political and economic policies pursued by various groups--freedpeople, ex-masters, northern policymakers, wage laborers, and African American women, for example--will be covered. African American viewpoints and histories will receive particular emphasis.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

HIST-301FH Colloquium: 'Food and Hunger in the Modern World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

At a time when rapidly rising food prices are causing distress, starvation and food riots around the world, we will focus our enquiry on the creation of markets for food and the industrialization of agriculture. What changed when food become a commodity traded over long distances? What changed when food began to be produced using industrialized methods? What are the social consequences of these transformations? What was the role of colonial rule in the loss of food security in Africa? What factors explain famine, and people's responses to it? We will explore these questions globally, with a focus on Africa, using recent and classic scholarship, and historical and current primary sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
H. Hanson

HIST-301HE Colloquium: 'History of Energy'

Fall. Credits: 4

We live in an age of energy crises, in which the future of energy is questioned in countless headlines and Twitter feeds. Often our energy agony accompanies other assumptions about energy's past, in particular the idea that social change invariably follows the discovery of new energy technologies. From food to fuel cells, this colloquium charts a more complicated and interesting history, a history in which people have continually shaped and made meaningful the energies that fuel the modern world. It will be of particular interest to students in history and environmental studies and to those interested in the social study of science and technology.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-301
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon

HIST-301MW Colloquium: 'The Middle East and World War I'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the Middle East within the context of the First World War. This relatively understudied yet historically pivotal moment cemented new imaginings of both nation and state, with consequences for population movements, changing political compasses, personal identities, and new social, cultural, economic, and religious formulations. Topics include democratic and social movements; the impact of war, famine, and genocide; the nuances of anti-colonialism; the rise of Arab nationalism, Zionism, and other nationalisms; Islamic movements; and the seeds of labor, communist, and women's movements. We will read relevant historiography and also closely investigate relevant primary sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Sbaiti
Prereq: 8 credits in History or African Studies.

HIST-301ND Colloquium: 'The Indian Ocean World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In recent years, the Indian Ocean has become an exciting field of historical scholarship, contributing to new understandings of Indian and world history. This colloquium explores trade and travel, conquest, religious conversion, and migration across a large area, from East Africa to the islands of Southeast Asia. Its purpose will be to understand a complex and integrated commercial system, pivoted on the Indian subcontinent, by considering movements of goods and people across the Indian Ocean.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. S. Datla
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

HIST-301NY Colloquium: 'Reading the New York Times: Journalism, Power, History'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the political and cultural power of the New York Times in the American past and present. Students will analyze the NYT today through daily reading, study its evolution as an institution, and research its coverage of critical historical events over the past century. We will also explore several larger issues: the history of news and newspapers; the relationship between journalistic practice and writing history; tensions between news organizations and government; the blurred boundaries between news and entertainment; the emergence of various ideological critiques of 'the media.'

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: 8 credits American history

HIST-301RG Colloquium: 'Race, Gender, and Empire: Cultural Histories of the United States and the World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Recent cultural histories of imperialism--European as well as U.S.--have illuminated the workings of race and gender at the heart of imperial encounters. This course will examine the United States' relationship to imperialism through the lens of such cultural histories. How has the encounter between Europe and America been remembered in the United States? How has the cultural construction of 'America' and its 'others' called into play racial and gender identities? How have the legacies of slavery been entwined with U.S. imperial ambitions at different times? And what can we learn from transnational approaches to 'the intimacies of empire?'

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333GG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in History, or 4 credits in History and 8 credits in Gender Studies.

HIST-301SA Colloquium: 'Women and Gender in Modern South Asia'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This colloquium will explore the history of South Asia as seen from women's perspectives. We will read writings by women from the ancient period to the present. We will focus on the diversity of women's experiences in a range of social, cultural, and religious contexts. Themes include sexuality, religiosity, rights to education and employment, violence against women, modernity and citizenship--in short, those issues central to women's movements in modern South Asia. In addition to the textual sources, the course will analyze Indian popular film and the representation of women in this modern visual genre.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333SA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. S. Datla
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

HIST-301WF Colloquium: 'Women and the Family in Imperial China'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the lives of women in imperial China (221 BCE-1911). How did Confucian didactic texts define women and their place in the family? Seen as the core of the family in a patrilineal, patrilocal, and patriarchical society, men prescribed women's roles in family life. How did women understand and respond to the social expectations imposed on them? What changed over the long history of imperial China? Students consider writings by and about women alongside the evidence of material culture.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333WF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Wu
Prereq: One course on East Asian history, culture, politics, or language.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

Research Seminars

HIST-317 Perspectives on American Environmental History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We explore the history of human-environment interactions in North America from precolonial times to the present from different cultural perspectives. How have such human activities as migration, colonization, and resource use depended on or modified the natural world? How have different cultural perceptions of and attitudes toward environment shifted through time and helped to reshape American landscapes? Case studies include ecological histories of Native America and Euro-America, slavery and land use, wilderness and conservation, and environmental racism and social justice. Our approach entails historical review of scientific studies, literature, visual records, and oral tradition.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-317
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.

HIST-322 Eternal Rome: The Renaissance City in Mind, Myth, and Imagination

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course investigates the many-layered levels of the city of Rome's complex history from its origins to the twenty-first century, focusing on the period beginning in 1420 when the rebuilding of the devastated medieval city begins and gradually gives rise to Rome of the Renaissance and the Baroque. Special attention will be given to the social and political history of Rome, its catastrophes and triumphs, paupers, princes and popes, myths, legacies, and deep secrets.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Prereq: 8 credits in History, preferably one dealing with Ancient or Renaissance Rome.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-323 Germans, Slavs, and Jews, 1900-1950

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores relations among Germans, Slavs, and Jews in Central and Eastern Europe before, during, and after the First and Second World Wars. Emphasis lies on tracing continuities and ruptures in nationalist and racist ideologies and policies, from late imperial Germany and Austria through the interwar republics and then on to the Third Reich and the post-Nazi regimes. Topics covered include the Holocaust, Nazi treatment of Poles, and the expulsion of millions of ethnic Germans from Poland and Czechoslovakia after 1945, but also mutual accommodation, assimilation, liberal group rights, and the ambiguities of who was German or Slavic or Jewish in the first place.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King
Prereq: 8 credits in History or International Relations.

HIST-331 Asian History Topics

Instructor permission required.

HIST-331CH Asian History: 'China's Tumultuous Twentieth Century'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A research seminar on the socioeconomic transformation of China from the advent of nineteenth-century imperialism to the Cultural Revolution. Topics include reform programs of the late Qing, the chaos and experimentation of the Republican period, and the centralizing totalitarianism of the People's Republic. Requirements include reviews of primary and secondary literature, definition and presentation of a research topic, and a final essay based on intensive research.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Instructor permission required.

HIST-333 Research Seminar in American Women's History

HIST-333ML Research Seminar in American Women's History: 'Mary Lyon's World and the History of Mount Holyoke'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What world gave rise to Mary Lyon's vision for Mount Holyoke and enabled her to carry her plans to success? What local and global circumstances subsequently shaped the institution and the women who passed through it? How did Mount Holyoke women attempt to fashion the worlds they encountered in and beyond South Hadley and what came of their efforts? We will inquire into the historical arrangements of power--involving race, class, gender, religion, culture, body politics, and colonialism--that formed Mount Holyoke and the world in which it has operated. Students write a substantial research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333ML
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Prereq: 8 credits of History.
Advisory: Prior fulfillment of the multicultural requirement is required.

HIST-341 Topics in African History

Instructor permission required.

HIST-341PW Topics in African History: 'Power and Exchange in the African Past'

Spring. Credits: 4

Did African nations become poorer in the 20th century because development initiatives were badly executed? inherently exploitative? ill-timed? Looking beyond the caricatures of evil colonial officers, lazy peasants, or greedy elites, who do we see engaged in productive activity and what are they doing? What concepts and categories illumine our understanding of their actions? How does a careful exploration of the nature of exchange and production in Africa revise our perception of the global economy in the present? We will explore three centuries of exchange in Africa and elsewhere: students may focus their research on the history of a market in any part of the world.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-341PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Hanson
Prereq: 8 credits of history or other significant preparatory coursework relevant to the topic.

HIST-356 Thinking Mountains

Spring. Credits: 4

Throughout the modern period the way people engaged with mountains reflected the currents of political and cultural thought. This course engages the history of human-mountain relations to think transnationally about major historiographical themes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: modernity, nature, empire, class, nationalism, science, leisure, environmentalism, gender, climate change, and ideology. Following British tourists into the Alps and a German scientist into the Andes, we will leave the beaten track of history and find that mountains are "good to think with." Along the way students will conduct a research project and experience the joys and challenges of historical research.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Roeder
Instructor permission required.

HIST-361 Modern Europe: The Nineteenth Century

HIST-361DA Modern Europe: The Nineteenth Century: 'Darwin'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course looks at the scientific content and intellectual context of Darwin's theory of evolution - his facts, metaphors, hypotheses, and philosophical assumptions. Readings from Darwin and his sources, and examination of the organisms he studied. A background in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century history or whole organism biology is recommended.

Crosslisted as: BIOL-308
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Rachootin
Prereq: BIOL-226 or HIST-248.

HIST-365 Modern Europe: The Twentieth Century

Instructor permission required.

HIST-365OE Modern Europe: The Twentieth Century: 'The Other Europe since Stalin'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A charting of the paths taken by Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary from the post-totalitarian regimes of the '60s through the fall of the Berlin Wall and on to membership in the European Union. Topics include strategies of political control and opposition, the uses of consumer culture, breaks and continuities between Communist and liberal capitalist orders, and national particularities to the regional project of undoing dictatorship. Sources reach from the elite to the everyday, and extend to film and fiction. Methods are comparative and interdisciplinary. Students not majoring in history are welcome.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. King
Prereq: 8 credits of History.

HIST-373 Cartography and Exploration in Early North America

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the history of mapping: what maps show, and what places the practice of cartography tends to erase, distort, or conceal. It focuses on the landscapes of early North America, where the representation and use of space was hotly contested by Natives, European settlers, and Africans. The course's topics include indigenous mapping traditions and concepts of sacred space, European navigational strategies during the 'Age of Discovery,' early urban planning, and scientific/military depictions. The course will teach strategies for employing maps as primary sources, and ways of understanding the historical and ideological circumstances of their production and circulation.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-374 The Afterlives of Objects: Revisiting Early American and Indigenous Histories through Material Culture

Fall. Credits: 4

Material culture studies examine relationships between people and objects. Tangible artifacts like furniture, clothing, ceramics, tools, and buildings give insight into communties' identities, aspirations, and struggles. This course approaches early American and indigenous histories through objects, and considers how interdisciplinary methodologies can reveal alternative understandings of the past. The course traces changing theories and practices of preservation, curation, and display; shifting conceptions of 'heritage' among diverse peoples; and ethical challenges posed by Native American items held in museums.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Prereq: 8 credits in History.
Advisory: 8 credits in United States history required; consult instructor if seeking an exemption
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

HIST-375 American History: the Middle Period

Instructor permission required.

HIST-381 Recent American History

Instructor permission required.

HIST-381HM Recent American History: 'The 1960s As History and Myth'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This research seminar offers an in-depth opportunity to explore the 1960s. To what extent was it a unique historical era? Does it make sense to think of a "long 1960s," beyond that decade? We will focus on several political and cultural movements, including civil rights, the anti-Vietnam war struggle, the counter culture, the emergence of feminism and gay rights, and the conservative backlash. How do the political, cultural, and intellectual conflicts of that day continue to shape American life today? Each student will write a seminar research paper based on intensive engagement with primary and secondary sources from the era.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom

HIST-381NY Recent American History: 'New York City: Capital of the World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A research seminar focusing on the cultural, social, and political life of New York City, with special reference to its uneasy relationship to American society as a whole. Examination of New York politics, writers and artists, architecture, immigrant communities, economic role, and shifting power relations. Accompanying film series and possible field trip to New York City, with historical walking tours.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom
Prereq: 8 credits in History.

HIST-381SD Recent American History: 'America Since the Great Depression'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This intensive seminar, centered on how to research and write about the recent American past, begins by considering several key historical interpretations of a variety of issues. Students write a substantial research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom

HIST-386 Central America: Reform, Reaction, Revolution

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores the diverse experiences of Central American nations in the twentieth century. From a common basis in an export-oriented agriculture, social and political alternatives ranging from social democracy to recurrent military rule, neofascist regimes, and revolutionary socialism have emerged in the isthmus. The course uses materials ranging from autobiography and literature to historical and anthropological studies to understand how this came to be. In addition to national cases, we consider the unique experiences of the area's indigenous and Atlantic-coast peoples within and outside the nation-state framework.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-386
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in Latin American Studies or History.

HIST-387 Special Topics in Latin American Studies

This course offers advanced students an opportunity for intensive study of a problem with careful attention to research methods and to presenting their work in oral and written form.

Instructor permission required.

HIST-388 The Original Other: Post Modernism and Latin America

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

For many the 'discovery' of America opened the modern era. Its closing may also have been foretold in Latin America's confounding of diverse theories of modernization and development in recent times. This seminar will introduce the student to a number of both classic and more recent works on Latin America (in English) that advance along postmodernist lines, ranging from cultural contact and conflict, language, meaning, and power in the sixteenth century, to the invention of national identities in the nineteenth century, to discourses of ethnicity, class, gender, and reason in the twentieth century.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-388
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson
Prereq: 8 credits from Latin American Studies.

HIST-389 Agrarian America: Sugar, Cotton, Coffee, Bananas, and Wheat

Fall. Credits: 4

Explores societies generated in the Americas by several widely distributed export crops. Multinational and cross-cultural comparisons holding constant the crop itself allows a focus on the possible variations by time and place in each commodity's technologies, labor systems, farm sizes, and social structure; their political and social dynamics; the problematic features of capitalism in agriculture, or if, how, and when do peasants become farmers and farming agribusiness? Particular focus on family and household relations under so-called "peasant to farmer" agricultural transitions and environmental implications of single-crop and export agriculture.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-389
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Gudmundson
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from Latin American Studies or related field.

Independent study

HIST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

HIST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.