German Studies (GRMST)

GRMST-101 Elementary German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of video and other online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Holden, M. Meirosu, D. Van Handle
Coreq: GRMST-101L.
Notes: requires conversation session (50 minutes)

GRMST-102 Elementary German

Spring. Credits: 4

Continuation of the elementary German course; practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Meirosu, D. Van Handle
Prereq: GRMST-101, or see department for placement.
Advisory: See department for placement if you have not taken German 101 at Mount Holyoke College
Notes: Requires conversation session (50 minutes). Labs will begin the week after classes start.

GRMST-103 Intensive Elementary German

Spring. Credits: 8

Two semesters in one. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
A. Holden
Coreq: GRMST-103L.
Notes: 4 meetings (75 minutes) plus required conversation session (50 minutes)

GRMST-115 German for Internships and Research

Fall. Credits: 2

For students who wish to acquire a working knowledge of German to prepare for an internship or research in a German-speaking country. Some knowledge of German affords students access to better placements in internships, especially DAAD RISE summer internships (http://www.daad.de/rise/en/rise-germany/) sponsored and supported by the German government. Focus on vocabulary and structures used when interacting with German speakers in specific cultural contexts or discipline-specific situations. Help with applications and resumes, along with presentations and staff from the CDC, McCulloch Center, and Alumnae Association.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
D. Van Handle

GRMST-201 Intermediate German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course emphasizes further development of contextual reading, writing, and speaking skills in German. Focus on strategies that help students learn vocabulary and use grammatical structures in appropriate ways. Discussion of a variety of texts and genres, as well as exploration of topics such as immigration and social justice. Frequent writing assignments and speaking opportunities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Holden
Prereq: GRMST-101, GRMST-102, or GRMST-103. Coreq: GRMST-201L.

GRMST-205 Europe on the Edge: Introduction to European Studies

Fall. Credits: 4

Europe embodies crossroads of multiple cultures, memories, migrations, and political demarcations. Taking a critical view of conventional paradigms of European nation states and "master" narratives, we study shifting European cultures and identities through multiple perspectives across time and space. What remains of the ancient and modern regimes? How have global movements, historical upheavals, and shifting boundaries within and adjacent to European borders from early empires to contemporary global networks affected the transformation of lives? Where is Europe heading today? Faculty from across the disciplines will join us to discuss Europe as a subject of global imagination and networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: This course is designed for students eager to expand their knowledge of globalization, cultural politics, identity formation, and critical social thought. Students are encouraged to combine this course with the study of one or more European languages and cultures, International Relations, film and media studies, translation studies, or other courses dedicated to transnational perspectives.

GRMST-215 Lesen, Schreiben, Sprechen

Spring. Credits: 2

Intensive practice in reading, writing, and speaking German. Students will write short essays on topics of their choosing, in addition to application letters and a sample resumé for an internship or job in Germany. We will focus also on developing reading strategies and on improving students' ability to converse colloquially, idiomatically, and formally in German. Readings on popular culture, music, as well as current political, social, cultural, historical, and economic issues in the German-speaking world, reflecting student interest and academic focus. Students engage in a variety of speaking activities such as presentations, role-playing and simulations, pair work, and group discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Van Handle
Prereq: GRMST-201.
Notes: Students in German Studies 221 or 223 are strongly encouraged to enroll in German Studies 215 or 216 for additional language practice and review.

GRMST-221 German Culture Today

GRMST-221SH German Culture Today: 'Stories and Histories'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines historical, cultural, and political developments that continue to frame debates about the twentieth century, World War II, the former GDR, and German unification. Thematic focus helps students develop accuracy, fluency, and complexity of expression. Reading, writing, and speaking are consistently integrated. Special emphasis is placed on text organization toward expanding students' language abilities, with a gradual movement from personal forms of expression to written and public discourse.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Prereq: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-223 Topics in German Studies

GRMST-223BT Topics in German Studies: 'From Flaneur to Hipster: Berlin in Text and Film'

Spring. Credits: 4

Since its rapid rise as a European and world metropolis in the late nineteenth century, Berlin has drawn both continuous fascination and criticism. The city has served as a playground for conflicting forces and become a symbol of Germany's and Europe's complicated path in the twentieth and twenty-first century. This class provides snapshots of Berlin's fascinating landscape from the 1900s to the present through a wide range of emblematic figures (the flaneur, the prostitute, the urban youth, the rebel, the hipster, etc.) at various sites of urban exploration.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Prereq: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German.
Notes: Taught in German

GRMST-223GM Topics in German Studies: 'In Flux: Germany, Migration, and the Other'

Fall. Credits: 4

Spanning the period from the 1950s to today, we investigate the shifting notions of national and cultural identity in East, West, and reunified Germany. We study both the history of migration as well as debates on German citizenship, nationhood and belonging to the society. The seminar combines philosophical texts, newspaper articles, literary materials, and films with public discussions and personal reflections on the topics of the seminar. Students are introduced to literary and film analysis, and encouraged to draw on current events which manifest anew Germany's complex role in a globalized world.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Prereq: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of College German, or 3 or more years of high school German.
Notes: Taught in German

GRMST-231 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

An introduction to critical reading, writing, and arguing skills, emphasizing the practice of oral and written strategies for discussing and analyzing printed and film texts and the reader's responses to them.

GRMST-231EM Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Spring. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: CST-249EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-231WN Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'From Weimar to Nazi Germany: Film and Society'

Spring. Credits: 4

Discussing both canonical and lesser-known films from the Weimar and Nazi period, we explore various artistic tendencies, movements and genres in order to define cinema's complex role in representing social and historical experience. We pay special attention to the modes of constructing cinematic spaces, and the social utopias and catastrophes which cinema came to represent.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Notes: This course includes a mandatory weekly film screening. Taught in English.

GRMST-231WT Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Philosophical Foundations of Western Thought: The Modern Period'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the development of Western philosophy from the 17th through the 19th centuries by examining selected writings of Descartes, Elizabeth of Bohemia, Hobbes, Margaret Cavendish, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Topics include the emerging modern scientific background against which modern Western philosophy developed; the nature, extent, and limits of human knowledge (epistemology); the existence and nature of God, fundamental reality, and the mind (metaphysics and philosophy of mind); and debates concerning who gets the right and opportunity to exercise reason and freedom in the context of our sociocultural environment (practical philosophy).

Crosslisted as: PHIL-202
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Koo

GRMST-232 German Studies Tutorial

Focus on developing discussion and reading skills in German, and revising and editing papers, or media projects, composed in German for German studies courses taught in English.

GRMST-251 A Global Enterprise: Germany Works

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will explore how the humanities and social sciences contribute to our understanding of the changing role of work from a historical perspective. We will investigate how the concept of 'work' affects social organization and individual identity formation. By concentrating on the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries within the German speaking countries and beyond, the seminar will shed light on the two eras when technological changes and their concomitant transformations in social and individual organization brought disruptive change to our notions of 'work.' We will focus our attention on 'work' by literary scholars, artists, and philosophers who often work in cross-disciplinary research networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Lauer
Notes: Taught in English.

GRMST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GRMST-315 Topics in German and European Culture in a Global Context

GRMST-323 Topics in German Studies: German Culture from 1800 to 2000

This course examines the cultural, political and social developments from 1800 to the present by investigating a significant topic. The selection of materials is exemplary rather than comprehensive and is based on thematic, historical, generic and other units.

GRMST-325 Senior Capstone Seminar

This seminar is designed to explore the nature of our field of inquiry in theory and practice. Students pursue independent research connecting German studies and another major academic field of interest, respond critically to each others' work, and lead discussions. All students read texts exploring such questions as: What does German Studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? Why learn German vis a vis "global English"? What meanings have been attributed to the terms "culture" and "civilization"?

GRMST-325RH Senior Capstone Seminar: 'Remembering the Holocaust in the Digital Age'

Spring. Credits: 4

The access to digital equipment has created a boom in transgenerational remembering of the Holocaust and its aftermath. Descendants of survivors, perpetrators, and bystanders in Germany and Austria continue to create documentaries about their family histories. We explore the motivation behind the making of these documentaries and other digital renditions of Holocaust narrative. How effective are they in contrast to more static forms of remembering, such as memorials, museums, and documentation centers? Students create a media project to complement their research papers.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-331 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

This seminar is designed to explore theoretically and practically the nature of our field of inquiry. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? What meanings have been attributed to the terms of 'culture' and 'civilization?' Texts from a variety of disciplines. Students write term papers on topics related to their major field(s) of interest.

GRMST-331EF Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'European Film in Global Context'

Fall. Credits: 4

This class addresses films which deal with European identity and experience in a global perspective. The concepts of "inside" and "outside" guide the discussion in a broad national, racial, ethnic, gender and generational context. The class tackles various genres and exhibition platforms, deepens the students' command of film analysis, and revisits key aspects of film style and form.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-370EF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Coreq: GRMST-331EFL.
Notes: Evening screenings are mandatory. The course is taught in English and all the films have English subtitles. Students may receive German credit if they register for German Studies 331EF and complete their assignments in German.

GRMST-332 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

Focus on developing argumentation and reading skills in German, and researching, revising and editing seminar papers written in German for German studies seminars taught in English.

GRMST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

GRMST-231 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

An introduction to critical reading, writing, and arguing skills, emphasizing the practice of oral and written strategies for discussing and analyzing printed and film texts and the reader's responses to them.

GRMST-231EM Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Spring. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: CST-249EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-231WN Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'From Weimar to Nazi Germany: Film and Society'

Spring. Credits: 4

Discussing both canonical and lesser-known films from the Weimar and Nazi period, we explore various artistic tendencies, movements and genres in order to define cinema's complex role in representing social and historical experience. We pay special attention to the modes of constructing cinematic spaces, and the social utopias and catastrophes which cinema came to represent.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Notes: This course includes a mandatory weekly film screening. Taught in English.

GRMST-231WT Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Philosophical Foundations of Western Thought: The Modern Period'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the development of Western philosophy from the 17th through the 19th centuries by examining selected writings of Descartes, Elizabeth of Bohemia, Hobbes, Margaret Cavendish, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, Mary Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Topics include the emerging modern scientific background against which modern Western philosophy developed; the nature, extent, and limits of human knowledge (epistemology); the existence and nature of God, fundamental reality, and the mind (metaphysics and philosophy of mind); and debates concerning who gets the right and opportunity to exercise reason and freedom in the context of our sociocultural environment (practical philosophy).

Crosslisted as: PHIL-202
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Koo

GRMST-331 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

This seminar is designed to explore theoretically and practically the nature of our field of inquiry. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? What meanings have been attributed to the terms of 'culture' and 'civilization?' Texts from a variety of disciplines. Students write term papers on topics related to their major field(s) of interest.

GRMST-331EF Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'European Film in Global Context'

Fall. Credits: 4

This class addresses films which deal with European identity and experience in a global perspective. The concepts of "inside" and "outside" guide the discussion in a broad national, racial, ethnic, gender and generational context. The class tackles various genres and exhibition platforms, deepens the students' command of film analysis, and revisits key aspects of film style and form.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-370EF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Coreq: GRMST-331EFL.
Notes: Evening screenings are mandatory. The course is taught in English and all the films have English subtitles. Students may receive German credit if they register for German Studies 331EF and complete their assignments in German.