German Studies (GRMST)

GRMST-101 Elementary German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of video and other online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
M. Lauer, D. Van Handle
Coreq: GRMST-101L.
Notes: Requires conversation session (50 minutes). Labs will begin the week after classes start.

GRMST-102 Elementary German

Spring. Credits: 4

Continuation of the elementary German course; practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with a German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Lauer, D. Van Handle
Prereq: GRMST-101, or see department for placement. Coreq: GRMST-102L.
Advisory: See department for placement if you have not taken German 101 at Mount Holyoke College
Notes: Requires conversation session (50 minutes). Labs will begin the week after classes start.

GRMST-103 Intensive Elementary German

Spring. Credits: 8

Two semesters in one. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German. Cultural and literary readings together with frequent use of online resources dealing with everyday situations and experiences in the German-speaking countries sensitize students to the cultural context in which the language is used. Weekly conversation sessions with German language assistant supplement class work.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Lauer

GRMST-115 German for Internships and Research

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

For students who wish to acquire a working knowledge of German to prepare for an internship or research in a German-speaking country. Some knowledge of German affords students access to better placements in internships, especially DAAD RISE summer internships (http://www.daad.de/rise/en/rise-germany/) sponsored and supported by the German government. Focus on vocabulary and structures used when interacting with German speakers in specific cultural contexts or discipline-specific situations. Help with applications and resumes, along with presentations and staff from the CDC, McCulloch Center, and Alumnae Association.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
D. Van Handle

GRMST-201 Intermediate German

Fall. Credits: 4

This course emphasizes further development of contextual reading, writing, and speaking skills in German. Focus on strategies that help students learn vocabulary and use grammatical structures in appropriate ways. Discussion of a variety of texts and genres, as well as exploration of topics such as immigration and social justice. Frequent writing assignments and speaking opportunities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Lauer
Advisory: It is recommended that students have taken GRMST-101, GRMST-102, or GRMST-103, or the equivalent.

GRMST-205 Europe on the Edge: Introduction to European Studies

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Europe embodies crossroads of multiple cultures, memories, migrations, and political demarcations. Taking a critical view of conventional paradigms of European nation states and "master" narratives, we study shifting European cultures and identities through multiple perspectives across time and space. What remains of the ancient and modern regimes? How have global movements, historical upheavals, and shifting boundaries within and adjacent to European borders from early empires to contemporary global networks affected the transformation of lives? Where is Europe heading today? Faculty from across the disciplines will join us to discuss Europe as a subject of global imagination and networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: This course is designed for students eager to expand their knowledge of globalization, cultural politics, identity formation, and critical social thought. Students are encouraged to combine this course with the study of one or more European languages and cultures, International Relations, film and media studies, translation studies, or other courses dedicated to transnational perspectives.

GRMST-215 Lesen, Schreiben, Sprechen

Spring. Credits: 2

Intensive practice in reading, writing, and speaking German. Students will write short essays on topics of their choosing, in addition to application letters and a sample resumé for an internship or job in Germany. We will focus also on developing reading strategies and on improving students' ability to converse colloquially, idiomatically, and formally in German. Readings on popular culture, music, as well as current political, social, cultural, historical, and economic issues in the German-speaking world, reflecting student interest and academic focus. Students engage in a variety of speaking activities such as presentations, role-playing and simulations, pair work, and group discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Lauer
Advisory: GRMST-201 or equivalent recommended,
Notes: Students in German Studies 221 or 223 are strongly encouraged to enroll in German Studies 215 or 216 for additional language practice and review.

GRMST-221 German Culture Today

GRMST-221SH German Culture Today: 'Stories and Histories'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines historical, cultural, and political developments that continue to frame debates about the twentieth century, World War II, the former GDR, and German unification. Thematic focus helps students develop accuracy, fluency, and complexity of expression. Reading, writing, and speaking are consistently integrated. Special emphasis is placed on text organization toward expanding students' language abilities, with a gradual movement from personal forms of expression to written and public discourse.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Lauer
Advisory: Previous study of German, normally equivalent to 3 semesters of college German, or 3 or more years of high school German recommended.
Notes: Taught in German.

GRMST-223 Topics in German Studies

Topics in German Studies provide students with an intensive study of major themes, issues, and paradigm shifts in German cultural studies.

GRMST-223BR Topics in German Studies: 'Berlin: Cultural Memories, Identities, Spaces'

Fall. Credits: 4

Berlin provides a testing ground for understanding how space shapes memory and identity. Historic sites within the built environment of Berlin mark historical upheaval and reconciliation and the transformation of the periphery into productive sites of commerce and cultural exchange. Multiple historic and contemporary sites will serve as a point of departure to explore the emergence of multidimensional identities in today's Europe. We explore the history, design, function, construction, and, in some cases, destruction, of major historical sites in Berlin, such as the Berlin Wall, the Reichstag, the Museum Island, the Holocaust Memorial, and others through case studies, archival research, and visual media. Students have the option of creating media projects and of drawing from other academic and professional interests.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Take GRMST-201 or GRMST-221.
Notes: Taught in German. May be taken for 300-level credit with permission of instructor.

GRMST-231 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

An introduction to critical reading, writing, and arguing skills, emphasizing the practice of oral and written strategies for discussing and analyzing printed and film texts and the reader's responses to them. Courses are taught in English.

GRMST-231EM Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: CST-249EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-231GB Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'A Global Enterprise: Germany Works'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will explore how the humanities and social sciences contribute to our understanding of the changing role of work from a historical perspective. We will investigate how the concept of 'work' effects social organization and individual identity formation. By concentrating on the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries within the German speaking countries and beyond, the seminar will shed light on the two eras when technological changes and their concomitant transformations in social and individual organization brought disruptive change to our notions of 'work.' We will focus our attention on 'work' by literary scholars, artists, and philosophers who often work in cross-disciplinary research networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Lauer
Notes: Taught in English. Students may receive German credit if they complete their assignments in German.

GRMST-231NT Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Black, Jewish, and Muslim Cultures in Germany: Intersectionalities of Othering'

Spring. Credits: 4

As much as German culture is riddled with extreme examples of persecution and nationalism, the presence of those deemed non-German, such as Black Africans, African Americans, Jews, and Muslims, shaped cultural expression and cultural exchange. In this seminar we explore the expression of otherness as portrayed in literature, film, and art from the eighteenth through twenty-first Centuries. Drawing from critical race theory, critical ethnic studies, and gender studies, we consider work by non-Germans as well as the representation of others in German canonical and popular cultural production.

Crosslisted as: JWST-225NT, CST-249NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GRMST-311 Advanced German Composition and Conversation

Spring. Credits: 4

This class offers intensive work in oral and written expression in German. Frequent papers and other exercises aimed at revising grammatical structures, improving students' writing in German, and broadening their comprehension of content and style. Oral reports, class discussion, and team exercises. Students will also have the option of completing an ongoing project of interest to them such as creating a YouTube channel or developing independent videos.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Prereq: One four-credit course above GRMST-201.

GRMST-325 Senior Capstone Seminar

Fall. Credits: 4

This capstone seminar explores the trans-disciplinary practice of German studies and its evolution from a study of literature and language to a field that draws from multiple disciplines, visualities, and approaches across the liberal arts curriculum. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What are the intersecting fields of inquiry ranging from German Jewish studies to environmental studies that form the way we address cultural, social, and political issues throughout German cultural history up to the present day? Within this context each student will draw from their academic and professional interests to present work in progress towards a major research project that may culminate in a media project, honors thesis, or standard research paper.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Prereq: GRMST-223.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

GRMST-331 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

This seminar is designed to explore theoretically and practically the nature of our field of inquiry. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? What meanings have been attributed to the terms of 'culture' and 'civilization?' Texts from a variety of disciplines are studied. Students write term papers on topics related to their major field(s) of interest.

GRMST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

GRMST-231 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

An introduction to critical reading, writing, and arguing skills, emphasizing the practice of oral and written strategies for discussing and analyzing printed and film texts and the reader's responses to them. Courses are taught in English.

GRMST-231EM Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: CST-249EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-231GB Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'A Global Enterprise: Germany Works'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will explore how the humanities and social sciences contribute to our understanding of the changing role of work from a historical perspective. We will investigate how the concept of 'work' effects social organization and individual identity formation. By concentrating on the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries within the German speaking countries and beyond, the seminar will shed light on the two eras when technological changes and their concomitant transformations in social and individual organization brought disruptive change to our notions of 'work.' We will focus our attention on 'work' by literary scholars, artists, and philosophers who often work in cross-disciplinary research networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Lauer
Notes: Taught in English. Students may receive German credit if they complete their assignments in German.

GRMST-231NT Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context: 'Black, Jewish, and Muslim Cultures in Germany: Intersectionalities of Othering'

Spring. Credits: 4

As much as German culture is riddled with extreme examples of persecution and nationalism, the presence of those deemed non-German, such as Black Africans, African Americans, Jews, and Muslims, shaped cultural expression and cultural exchange. In this seminar we explore the expression of otherness as portrayed in literature, film, and art from the eighteenth through twenty-first Centuries. Drawing from critical race theory, critical ethnic studies, and gender studies, we consider work by non-Germans as well as the representation of others in German canonical and popular cultural production.

Crosslisted as: JWST-225NT, CST-249NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English

GRMST-331 Topics in German and European Studies in a Global Context

This seminar is designed to explore theoretically and practically the nature of our field of inquiry. We explore such questions as: What does German studies mean? What is interdisciplinary work? What role does literature play in culture studies? What is the relationship between language and the construction of culture? What meanings have been attributed to the terms of 'culture' and 'civilization?' Texts from a variety of disciplines are studied. Students write term papers on topics related to their major field(s) of interest.