Environmental Studies (ENVST)

ENVST Course Offerings

ENVST-100 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the field of environmental studies and to some of the scientific, historical, political, economic and cultural aspects of environmental concerns. Through interdisciplinary lenses, we explore the complexities of many issues and problems such as climate change, threats to biodiversity, and toxic environments. In addition to fostering an understanding of their origins, the course focuses on potential solutions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
K. Ballantine, T. Farnham

ENVST-104 Renewable Energy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will examine the feasibility of converting the entire energy infrastructure of the US from one that is dependent on fossil fuels to one that utilizes mostly renewable sources of energy. We will examine the potential scale of energy production and the associated costs, natural resource requirements and land usage needs for both renewables, such as solar, wind and biofuel, and non-renewables, such as coal, natural gas, petroleum and nuclear. By applying extensive use of basic algebra and an elementary understanding of the physical processes underpinning each energy technology, we will arrive at a number of urgent conclusions about the challenges facing our energy infrastructure.

Crosslisted as: PHYS-104
Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
A. Arango

ENVST-150 Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies

ENVST-150DV Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Introduction to the Histories and Theories of Development'

Fall. Credits: 4

What is so compelling about the idea of development? Why does it fail much of the global south? Do colonialism and capitalism have anything to do with it? Why do hunger, poverty, inequality, unemployment, and ecological crises persist in the so-called developed world? What are the parameters of the proposed solutions to underdevelopment such as neoliberal market reforms versus those of alternative models? What are the connections between development and environmental issues? development and war? Can development be sustainable? Are gender and race incidental or central to these issues? This course engages these questions through readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise

ENVST-150PH Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Introduction to Environmental and Public Health'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers a broad introduction to the problems and solutions in the field of environmental and public health. Students will read about and discuss issues that occur in both industrialized and developing countries. Topics include the biological, physical, and chemical agents of environmental contamination; methods used in epidemiology and toxicology to evaluate environmental hazards; policies currently in place to reduce health risks and protect populations from exposure; and emerging global environmental health problems.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Albertine

ENVST-200 Environmental Science

Fall. Credits: 4

Most of the environmental challenges we face are complex and interdisciplinary in nature. This course introduces students to the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to both understand the interrelationships of the natural world, as well as to identify and analyze environmental problems and think critically about alternative solutions for addressing them. Key concepts from ecology, biogeochemistry, and other scientific fields inform our study of climate change, water resources, soil sustainability, food production, and other topics. Fundamental and emerging issues are examined using regional case studies, hands-on problem solving, and field and laboratory experiments.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
K. Ballantine
Prereq: One 100-level lab science. Coreq: ENVST-200L.
Advisory: One course in statistics is recommended.

ENVST-210 Political Ecology

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will explore the historical, political, economic, social, and cultural contexts in which human-environment interactions occur. We will cover critical topics and trends in the field of political ecology, from its early manifestations to more recent expansions. Using case studies from the global south and north, we will discuss factors that shape social and environmental change across scales from the personal to the global, and we will examine the role of gender, race, class, and power in struggles over resources. Students will become familiar with the academic debates in which political ecologists are engaged, and they will apply the concepts discussed in a case of their choice.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-233 Topics in Environmental Studies

ENVST-233AE Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Philosophical Issues Concerning Animals'

Spring. Credits: 4

Who are non-human animals? In this course, we will think about this question and others -- specifically about the ethical relationship "human animals" have to these beings. We will ask such questions like: What are the philosophical -- especially the ethical -- implications of the scientific research on non-human animals? What determines the quality of life of any animal -- human or nonhuman? What obligations do we have to non-human animals? Our answers to these questions will have implications for human businesses, our diet, our pets, our legal system, and, ultimately, how we think about ourselves as 'human animals.' The course format consists of lecture, discussion, regular writing and the possibility of a class presentation.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-250AE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
T. White

ENVST-233EP Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Environmental Pollution'

Spring. Credits: 4

Humans are increasing the amount of pollutants in the environment, particularly through the burning of fossil fuels and other industrial practices. As human population increases exponentially, our consumption and production of waste and pollution do the same. This class will investigate where the pollutants come from, their presence in the environment, and the biological effects of these pollutants. There will be a special emphasis on how the pollutants that humans produce feed back to affect human health. While this class is primarily science based, we will also address topics in environmental justice and environmental policy.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Albertine
Prereq: ENVST-100, ENVST-150PH, or other 100-level science course.

ENVST-233ET Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Environmental Ethics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A fundamental problem we face as humans is how we should relate to the natural world. Why not turn Yosemite into a parking lot? Should we control nature by applying scientific and technological expertise? Or should we strive for noninterference and preservation of the wild? How do we balance the pressing needs of people for food, energy, and other resources with the needs of other species or whole ecosystems?

Crosslisted as: PHIL-260ET
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Arden

ENVST-233RV Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Rivers and Society'

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course, you will think like a river scientist, evaluate societal issues related to rivers, and learn to communicate these points to a general audience. The course is organized around broad topics in river science: river migration, floods, deltas, human water usage, river ecology, and dams. Case studies will include the Yellow River in China, the Mississippi River and Hurricane Katrina, water rights in the southwest U.S. and Mexico, and the Elwha River dam removals in the Pacific northwest (with Skype lectures from Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe scientists).

Crosslisted as: GEOL-241RV
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Leung
Prereq: Any science, math, or geography course.

ENVST-237 Native American History Through 1865

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course surveys Native American history from ancient times through the U.S. Civil War, tracing the ways that tribal communities have shaped North America. Beginning with the diverse indigenous societies that inhabited the Americas millennia before Columbus's arrival, it discusses the cultural complexity of Native peoples, nations, and worldviews rooted in particular ecosystems and homelands. It moves through the early modern era of European scientific exploration and "discovery" of a New World, and the pivotal violences of the "Indian Wars" of the seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries.

Crosslisted as: HIST-235
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia

ENVST-240 The Value of Nature

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Through this seminar, students develop an in-depth knowledge of and articulate vocabulary for the significant and diverse ways that humans value the natural world - utilitarian, scientific, aesthetic, naturalistic, symbolic, ethical, and spiritual. We use these different typologies of human environmental values as frameworks for readings and discussion, extending our examination to historical and cultural variations in values, competing perspectives of the natural world, and other value concepts, including intrinsic and transformative value. We examine the concept of biophilia and probe the role values play in the concern over losses of biological diversity and its implications.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. Farnham
Prereq: ENVST-100.
Notes: gateway course for minor in Conceptual Foundations of Science

ENVST-241 Environmental Issues

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course, we will explore the different facets of numerous environmental policy issues and review the substantive aspects, legal themes, and regulatory structure of the major federal environmental laws. The laws covered in this course include the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and others. The course objectives are for the student to learn the basic regulatory characteristics of the major laws and to become well-versed in the current environmental issues which we will focus upon throughout the semester, such as global climate change, ocean degradation, energy resources, and biodiversity loss.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
T. Farnham
Prereq: ENVST-100, or ENVST-150PH, or ENVST-150DV.

ENVST-242 Global-Local Inequality and the Environment

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will engage students in thinking about the dynamic relationship between inequality and the environment. We will examine some of the major theories, paradigms, concepts, policies, and programs that analyze, explain, predict or attempt to affect change in the global South. As we discuss the evolution of development theories and practices over time, we will reflect on how its theoretical underpinnings help us to understand policy and programmatic "successes" and "failures." The first part of the course introduces students to philosophical and theoretical debates about inequality and resource access, drawing on development theory to explore evolving approaches to integrate environment and development. We will consider complementary and contrasting perspectives about the causes of and solutions to global poverty and environmental degradation and reflect on how our assumptions shape what we "see" in specific sites, how we frame particular problems and what we suggest as solutions. As we trace approaches to sustainable development from global environmental politics to site-specific case studies, the second half of the course connects through a series of virtual conversations about inequality and the environment with the Mount Holyoke College program in Costa Rica.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Corson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One course in geography or one related social sciences course.

ENVST-243 Rural Prosperity in the African Past

Fall. Credits: 4

This course seeks to understand what relationships engendered rural prosperity in African communities in the past, and what processes of change have led millions of rural people to abandon their homes and livelihoods to join flows of migrants to cities and other nations. We examine African patterns of production over the long term and the transformation of African agriculture in the last two centuries, considering famine, the social and political organization of access to productive resources, and the relationship of rural and urban communities. We ask how rural prosperity might be recreated in the 21st century.

Crosslisted as: HIST-243, AFCNA-243
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
H. Hanson

ENVST-267 Reading and Writing in the World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to reading and writing about nature, this seminar will attempt an exchange across distinct approaches to observing and describing the world around us. Do lenses of culture, discipline, and gender determine how we see and experience nature, environment, and place? Course work will include reading such authors as N. Scott Momaday, Henry David Thoreau, bell hooks, Leslie Marmon Silko, Mary Oliver, Terry Tempest Williams, Wendell Berry, and Annie Dillard; field trips; and writing assignments--weekly field notes and journals, analytical papers, and personal essays.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-267
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form

ENVST-271 Place and Power in the American West and Pacific World

Spring. Credits: 4

The vast region of North America between the Mississippi River and Pacific Ocean has been a site of many migrations, conflicts, political transformations, and environmental changes. This course examines dynamic histories of Native American tribes, Euro-American "explorers" and colonists, cowboys and miners, Asian immigrant laborers, and mariners, all of whom helped create interior and oceanic worlds. It focuses on natural and human changes in specific locales, and also explores how public histories at these places shape the present and future.

Crosslisted as: HIST-271
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia

ENVST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENVST-301 History of Energy

Spring. Credits: 4

We live in an age of energy crises, in which the future of energy is questioned in countless headlines and Twitter feeds. Often our energy agony accompanies other assumptions about energy's past, in particular the idea that social change invariably follows the discovery of new energy technologies. From food to fuel cells, this colloquium charts a more complicated and interesting history, a history in which people have continually shaped and made meaningful the energies that fuel the modern world. It will be of particular interest to students in history and environmental studies and to those interested in the social study of science and technology.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301HE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon

ENVST-315 Research, Ethics and Policy in Environmental Studies

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designed to promote curriculum-to-career, this hands-on course prepares students for independent research, research internships, or research careers.Student pick topics of interest and share weekly assignments. Over the course of the semester, we examine methods for designing research and for gathering and analyzing information, and we discuss using data to inform policy. We speak with Mount Holyoke alumnae who have conducted research during internships, for honors theses and independent study, or for policy institutes after graduating. Finally, we consider ethical issues, from gendered experiences to cross-cultural research, and students prepare institutional review board proposals. Students from various disciplines are welcome.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Corson
Prereq: 8 credits of 200 level social science or humanities courses
Notes: Meets the ES politics and policy, environment and development, and conservation concentration requirements.

ENVST-316 Restoration Ecology

Spring. Credits: 4

A key test of our ecological knowledge is whether we can successfully apply it to create or restore ecosystems that have been damaged or destroyed. As we take on the role of restoration ecologists this semester, we will use principles and methods of ecology, conservation biology, hydrology, soil science, and related disciplines to learn about the theory, practice, and politics of ecosystem restoration. This course emphasizes fieldwork, interdisciplinary teamwork, and ecological planning to evaluate and design restoration projects in our surrounding communities and regional landscapes. On a few occasions, meetings may last until 5:05 pm so that we can go on fieldtrips that are farther from campus.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
K. Ballantine
Prereq: ENVST-200 or at least 8 credits of 200 or 300-level laboratory science.

ENVST-317 Perspectives on American Environmental History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We explore the history of human-environment interactions in North America from precolonial times to the present from different cultural perspectives. How have such human activities as migration, colonization, and resource use depended on or modified the natural world? How have different cultural perceptions of and attitudes toward environment shifted through time and helped to reshape American landscapes? Case studies include ecological histories of Native America and Euro-America, slavery and land use, wilderness and conservation, and environmental racism and social justice. Our approach entails historical review of scientific studies, literature, visual records, and oral tradition.

Crosslisted as: HIST-317
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.

ENVST-321 Conference Courses in Environmental Studies

Selected topics in areas of environmental interest, determined by faculty expertise and student needs. Study in small groups or by individual students working with faculty.

ENVST-321CF Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'The Challenges of Feeding Nine Billion People'

Fall. Credits: 4

Human population is expected to surpass nine billion in the next century. As our population grows, so will our need for food. Land available to grow food will not increase and degrading environmental conditions will make adequate food production on this land increasingly difficult. We will focus on the challenges to meet the nutritional needs of a growing population as well as look at some of the possible solutions for the future from a scientific standpoint. These challenges/solutions will be investigated at both the world and local (northeast United States) scales. In addition to being a heavily science-based class on food security, we will also address issues of food justice and environmental justice.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
J. Albertine
Prereq: Environmental Studies 200 or other 200 level biological or plant science class.

ENVST-321CP Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Political Economy of the Environment: Capitalism and Climate Change'

Spring. Credits: 4

Can an economic system predicated on infinite growth achieve sustainability on a finite planet? This question will likely define the twenty-first century. This course aims to grapple with this paradox, examining the relationships and tensions between the globally dominant form of economy - capitalism - and global climate change. We will explore the interwoven rise of capitalism and emergence of fossil fuel energy, as well as the global expansion of capitalism and the connections between resources, economic growth, and political power. We will engage with various theoretical approaches to capitalism-environment relations, such as metabolic rift theory, the second contradiction of capitalism, and the production of nature thesis. These theories provide insight into recent forms of capitalism (i.e. neoliberalism) and the increasing degradation and commodification of the environment. We end by studying contemporary debates, examining institutions and policies seeking to manage climate change from with liberal-capitalist frameworks, the emergence of the "green economy", and the politics of climate denialism, concluding with alternatives economies and the climate justice movement. This course will provide students with theoretical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding economy-environment relationships.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-321HC Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Human Health and Climate Change'

Spring. Credits: 4

Climate change presents a global public health problem, with serious health impacts predicted to manifest in varying ways in different parts of the world. Through this course, we will investigate these health effects which include increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease, injuries and premature deaths related to extreme heat, weather, and other disaster events, and changes in the prevalence and geographical distribution of food- and water-borne illnesses and other infectious diseases. We will critically review the literature documenting recent and current impacts and predictions for the future. We will also look at solutions in place for adapting to these changes.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
J. Albertine
Prereq: ENVST-200.

ENVST-321TX Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Toxic Entanglements: Environmental (In)Justice in the United States'

Fall. Credits: 4

Toxic water in Flint, Michigan. Oil pipelines through sacred sites in North Dakota. These manifestations of environmental injustice and inequality are only the most recent incarnations of larger legacies. Environments are never simply natural or given: they are imbued with unequal entanglements of gender, race, class, and power. Environmental justice asks questions about the ways in which environments are produced, and the relations of risk, harm, benefit, access, privilege, domination, oppression, and liberation therein. In this course, we will study the theory and practice of environmental (in)justice in the United States. We will briefly explore histories of environmental injustice in the U.S. (from colonization and slavery, to industrialization and pollution); past and current struggles over the siting of production facilities, toxic waste, and pollution; and recent events around water (be they floods, toxicity, or protection): Hurricane Katrina, Flint, and Standing Rock. We will pay particular attention to questions of food and justice, examining gender, race, and class in agricultural labor, corporate power in agribusiness, food deserts, food access/health and white privilege, and gender in alternative community food movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits from a related subject.

ENVST-335 Wetlands Ecology and Management

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Although they cover ~0.6% of the earth's surface, wetlands perform more ecosystem services per hectare than any other ecosystem type. Alarmingly, over half of the earth's wetlands have been lost to agriculture and development. With these wetlands were also lost the valuable ecosystem functions wetlands perform. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the biogeochemical, ecological, societal, and regulatory aspects of wetland ecosystems. Group discussion of primary scientific literature, as well as independent experimental design and the writing of a research proposal are core components. Field trips will sometimes keep us until 5:05 pm, and will provide an opportunity to explore these fascinating ecosystems in person.

Applies to requirement(s): Math Sciences
K. Ballantine
Prereq: ENVST-200 or at least 8 credits of 200- or 300-level laboratory science.

ENVST-337 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Environment and Development

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will engage students in interdisciplinary thinking about the dynamic relationship between environment and development. Focusing on specific case studies, we will consider complementary and contrasting perspectives about the causes of and solutions to global poverty and environmental degradation. We will examine how development theories and practices have changed over time, and we will reflect on how our assumptions shape what we "see" in specific sites, how we frame particular problems and what we suggest as solutions. The course is designed as a curriculum-to-career course in which students build practical skills for international development careers.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

ENVST-341 Science and Power in Environmental Governance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course applies concepts from political ecology to study how governance, broadly defined, works in relation to the environment. Using case studies of international environmental issues, we will explore how people make decisions about the environment in a policy realm. We will discuss the role of various agents, such as governments, scientific bodies, and nongovernmental organizations, in the decision-making process. We will reflect on who has access to decisions; how scientific data is used; how environmental ideas become powerful; and how policies are legitimated. Armed with this information, we will consider how to advocate for global environmental sustainability and social equity.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-342 Living in the Anthropocene: Development, Technology, Futures

Spring. Credits: 4

The concept of the Anthropocene (the "human epoch") signifies that human activity has become the dominant physical force on the planet. Mainstream narratives envision three phases of the Anthropocene: industrial origins (1800 - 1950); global expansion and the nuclear age (1950 - 2000+); and an emergent third phase marked by massive shifts in land-use and biodiversity. This course undertakes a critical examination of the Anthropocene concept. We will analyze debates over geological demarcation, the term itself and the "anthropos" it embodies, and eco-modernist conceptions of a "good" Anthropocene. We aim to historically contextualize the socio-technical phases of the Anthropocene (industrial revolution, post-WWII global expansion, and contemporary globalization), situating them as processes emerging within a specific political-economic context (capitalism). Finally, we examine struggles over the socio-ecological entanglements shaping its future directions: urbanization, industrialized agriculture, genetic technology, and geoengineering/Earth System management. This course explores what it means to live in an era where a subset of one species can determine the conditions of possibility for life on the entire planet.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-343 Applied Environmental Geology

Spring. Credits: 2

This 2-credit field-based course focuses on assessing the environmental impact of applied road salt in two local hill towns. Each week we will work to measure stream discharge, stream water quality, and measure soil water and snow bank salinity. Each student will pursue their own independent research project but will work collaboratively with other students in the class.

Crosslisted as: GEOL-343
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
A. Werner
Prereq: GEOL-123 or ENVST-200.
Notes: Half semester.

ENVST-373 Nature and Gender

ENVST-377 Cartography and Exploration in Early North America

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the history of mapping: what maps show, and what places the practice of cartography tends to erase, distort, or conceal. It focuses on the landscapes of early North America, where the representation and use of space was hotly contested by Natives, European settlers, and Africans. The course's topics include indigenous mapping traditions and concepts of sacred space, European navigational strategies during the 'Age of Discovery,' early urban planning, and scientific/military depictions. The course will teach strategies for employing maps as primary sources, and ways of understanding the historical and ideological circumstances of their production and circulation.

Crosslisted as: HIST-373
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. DeLucia
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Notes: meets history department pre-1750 requirement

ENVST-390 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

Fall. Credits: 4

This is the capstone course of the environmental studies major. The course explores linkages among the diversity of disciplines that contribute to the environmental studies major, illustrates how these disciplines that contribute to the environmental studies major are used in environmental decision making, enables students to inform one another's roles as environmentalists, and provides students with opportunities to develop individual and cooperative projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
T. Farnham
Restrictions: This course is limited to ENVST Majors.

ENVST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Courses Approved as Core Intermediate Courses

Group A: Natural Sciences

Biological Sciences
BIOL-200Introductory Biology II: How Organisms Develop4
BIOL-223Ecology4
BIOL-226Evolution4
BIOL-236TATopics in Biological Sciences: 'Biology of Terrestrial Arthropods'4
BIOL-310Invertebrate Zoology4
BIOL-315Behavioral Ecology4
BIOL-325Plant Diversity and Evolution4
BIOL-331Theory and Application of Conservation Biology4
Chemistry
CHEM-201General Chemistry II4
CHEM-202Organic Chemistry I4
Environmental Studies
ENVST-200Environmental Science4
ENVST-233EPTopics in Environmental Studies: 'Environmental Pollution'4
ENVST-233RVTopics in Environmental Studies: 'Rivers and Society'4
ENVST-316Restoration Ecology4
ENVST-321CFConference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'The Challenges of Feeding Nine Billion People'4
ENVST-321HCConference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Human Health and Climate Change'4
ENVST-335Wetlands Ecology and Management4
Geography
GEOG-205Mapping and Spatial Analysis4
GEOG-230Environmental Soil Science4
Geology
GEOL-201Rocks and Minerals4
GEOL-202History of Earth4
GEOL-227Groundwater4
GEOL-240Geological Resources and the Environment4
GEOL-241RVTopics in Geology: 'Rivers and Society'4

Group B: Humanities and Social Sciences

Environmental Studies
ENVST-210Political Ecology4
ENVST-237Native American History Through 18654
ENVST-241Environmental Issues4
ENVST-242Global-Local Inequality and the Environment4
ENVST-315Research, Ethics and Policy in Environmental Studies4
ENVST-321CPConference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Political Economy of the Environment: Capitalism and Climate Change'4
ENVST-321TXConference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Toxic Entanglements: Environmental (In)Justice in the United States'4
ENVST-337Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Environment and Development4
ENVST-341Science and Power in Environmental Governance4
ENVST-342Living in the Anthropocene: Development, Technology, Futures4
Geography
GEOG-204Human Dimensions of Environmental Change4
GEOG-304UPPlanning and the Environment: 'Urban Planning'4
GEOG-313Third World Development4
GEOG-319Africa: Problems and Prospects4
Geology
GEOL-326Seminar: Global Climate Change4
Latin American Studies
LATAM-389Agrarian America: Sugar, Cotton, Coffee, Bananas, and Wheat4