English (ENGL)

ENGL-103 Academic Discourse and Multilingual Speakers

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course we to seek to achieve clarity and precision of expression within a discussion of complex questions. Past semesters' topics include: the role of education in society; the relationship between religion, culture, and nature; and the use of maps in ordering the world. In addition to the academic content, the course focuses on the writing and revising process, academic research and argumentation, and the nature and purpose of academic discourse. This course is intended for students whose native language is not English and who would like to refine their writing and speaking skills. Although it is the first in a two-course sequence (103-104), multilingual students who have already taken English 104 may register.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Shea

ENGL-104 Academic Discourse and Multilingual Speakers

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course we to seek to achieve clarity and precision of expression within a discussion of a complex topic. Course readings and writing assignments guide students through an examination of topics related to society and culture. Past semesters' topics include: the role of education in society; the relationship between religion, culture, and nature; and the use of maps in ordering the world. In addition to the academic content, the course focuses on the writing and revising process, academic research and argumentation, and the nature and purpose of academic discourse. This course is intended for students whose native language is not English and who would like to refine their writing and speaking skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Shea

ENGL-199 Introduction to the Study of Literature

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines various strategies of literary representation through a variety of genres, including such traditional literary forms as the novel, lyric poetry, drama, and autobiography, as well as other cultural forms, such as film. Particular attention is given to student writing; students are expected to write a variety of short essays on selected topics. Though the themes of specific sections may vary, all sections seek to introduce students to the terminology of literary and cultural discourse. Please note that this course is a requirement for all English majors.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman, C. Benfey, A. Martin, K. O'Callaghan, A. Rodgers, K. Singer, W. Yu
Prereq: Any first-year seminar.
Notes: English 199, required for the English major, introduces students to critical issues in the study of English literature. Students considering an English major will ordinarily take English 199 after taking a first year seminar.

ENGL-248 Effective Public Speaking

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course provides the opportunity to develop speaking skills in a range of academic and professional situations. Through speaking, revision, and reflection, students identify their strengths as speakers, evaluate their improvement, and develop strategies for formal and informal speaking contexts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Shea
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Notes: Half semester course. This section is designed to consider the needs of multilingual and second language speakers, but it is open to upper-level students of any language background.

Writing Courses: Prose and Poetry

ENGL-201 Introduction to Creative Writing

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers practice in writing various kinds of narrative. Assignments emphasize clarity, concision, and creativity. Exercises lead to longer work: sketches or short stories. Students hone critical as well as writing skills. Student papers are duplicated and discussed in class, along with selected works by published authors.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace, C. Demas, A. Lawlor
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Second-semester first-years with permission of instructor.

ENGL-202 Introduction to Journalism

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The finest journalists are professors to the people. They educate citizens so as to facilitate reasoned, fact-based dialogue on subjects as diverse as politics, poverty, war, science, and the arts. We will look at journalism's role in the culture with a particular view to some of the profession's failings and foibles. Students are expected to leave the comfortable confines of the classroom as they try their hand at covering an event, writing a profile, and reporting on an issue of local significance. Throughout the term we will employ the journalistic skills of interviewing, research, and thoughtful analysis to produce snapshots of the world inside and outside the College gates. Curiosity leads. Mastery follows.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
T. Brewster
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Second-semester first-years with permission of instructor.

ENGL-203 Short Story Writing I

Fall. Credits: 4

This workshop will introduce students to the short story form as practiced by contemporary and canonical writers. Students will learn to read fiction actively, as writers developing their craft. We will focus on understanding the elements of fiction with an eye toward eventual mastery. Writing short stories will comprise the main work of this course, and students will work specifically on point of view, development of scenes, characterization, plot, and narration.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
V. Martin
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-204 Poetry Writing

Fall. Credits: 4

In this introductory course, students will read widely in contemporary poetry. Through prompts and project-based inquiry, both within the workshop and in take-home assignments, students will have the opportunity to produce and share writing based on the conceptual frameworks explored in the class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-205 Playwriting

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers practice in the fundamentals of dramatic structure and technique. Weekly reading assignments will examine the unique nature of writing for the theatre, nuts and bolts of format, tools of the craft, and the playwright's process from formulating a dramatic idea to rewriting. Weekly writing assignments will include scene work, adaptation, and journaling. The course will culminate in a significant writing project. Each class meeting will incorporate reading student work aloud with feedback from the instructor and the class. Students will listen, critique, and develop the vocabulary to discuss plays, structure, story, and content.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-283
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Syers
Prereq: One course in Theatre Arts or a creative writing English course.
Notes: Cannot be taken at the 300 level.

ENGL-206 Expository Prose

ENGL-208 Topics in Journalism

ENGL-219 Topics in Creative Writing

ENGL-219FB Topics in Creative Writing: 'Writing Fabulist Fiction'

Fall. Credits: 4

In which our heroes will explore contemporary and classic fabulist fiction, fairy tales, and mythic fiction in order to produce their own short stories. Some of the authors we may read include Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Isak Dineson, Gabriel García Márquez, Nalo Hopkinson, Porochista Khakpour, Larissa Lai, Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, and Bruno Schulz.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 or equivalent.

ENGL-219QT Topics in Creative Writing: 'Queer and Trans Writing'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204QT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 and 4 credits in Gender Studies.

ENGL-301 Studies in Journalism

ENGL-301MW Studies in Journalism: 'Magazine Writing - Sequence I'

Fall. Credits: 4

Students in this class will produce original works at magazine length. Assignments will get them out of the classroom and into the world, exploring feature stories and local issues of importance. A student's mastery of her chosen topic will rest on personal observation, extensive interviews, and deep research. All pieces produced will go through multiple drafts. Readings are designed to shape classroom discussion and lend inspiration. These will include classics of the genre, as well as material from current issues of the in the New Yorker, Slate, Atlantic Monthly, Vanity Fair, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, and other publications.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
T. Brewster
Prereq: Intro to Journalism, Intro to Creative Writing, or Narrative-Non Fiction.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-301PR Studies in Journalism: 'The Press and the Presidency'

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course, we will pinpoint six moments in American history when great journalism focused on the presidency has driven the national story. We will augment that study of the past with a steady examination of the present, seeking to understand how the 45th president's assault on the press has prompted many to reconsider -- and to reconfirm -- the role of a vigorous, questioning media in the success of a democratic republic. Students will do both historical analysis and contemporary journalism, employing the tools of strong reporting, graceful prose and pithy analysis to shed light on the presidency in a time of peril.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
T. Brewster
Prereq: ENGL-202 Intro to Journalism.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-302 Nonfiction Writing

ENGL-303 Short Story Writing II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This workshop is for students seriously engaged in writing short stories. Students will refine their technical skills and work on the subtleties of style. Extensive readings are required.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Demas
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in department beyond ENGL-101, including ENGL-203 or equivalent, submitted writing sample, and permission of instructor.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-304 Verse Writing II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this workshop students will generate new poems, working in both free verse and traditional forms. Emphasis will be given to honing elements of craft, to developing one's 'voice,' and to the all-important process of revision. Readings will include books by contemporary poets, with workshops devoted to critiquing student work and discussing the poems of established writers.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: ENGL-204 and 4 additional credits from English above 101.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-305 Writing Literature for Children

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A workshop focusing on writing for children at different age levels. Students will work on a variety of projects in fiction and nonfiction, and experiment with different styles, forms, and approaches. Weekly writing and editing assignments and selected readings of children's literature are required. The course includes guest lectures (which are open to the campus) and field trips.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. Demas
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in department including ENGL-201, ENGL-204, or ENGL-265, and permission of instructor. Creative writing sample must be submitted to instructor during advising week.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-306 Advanced Projects in Creative Writing

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed for students already at work on a longer project (a novel or novella, a short story collection, a collection of poems, longform creative nonfiction, a graphic novel, or a hybrid form). Students will build on the skills and insights gained in previous creative writing courses to draft, workshop, and revise a full-length creative manuscript. Workshop and revision will comprise much of our time, along with readings on craft by authors such as Lynda Barry, Italo Calvino, and Samuel R. Delany. Students will also have an opportunity to meet literary publishing professionals.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: ENGL-201 or equivalent.

ENGL-361 Advanced Creative Writing Topics

ENGL-361PM Advanced Creative Writing Topics: 'Poetry and Image: Formations of Identity'

Spring. Credits: 4

With an emphasis on producing creative texts, the course will examine the parallel and often overlapping impulses of poetry and image-making (photography, painting, and other visual arts). We will explore concepts of identity through the work of artists such as Alice Neel, Mikalene Thomas, Claude Cahun, Cindy Sherman, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Catherine Opie, Kara Walker, Diane Arbus, Vivian Maier, and Nan Goldin. Writers will include Ocean Vuong, Danez Smith, Sherwin Bitsui, Robert Seydel, Ari Banias, Safia Elhillo, Gloria Anzaldua, Morgan Parker, Layli Longsoldier, Judy Grahn, Audre Lorde, Ronaldo Wilson, Shane McCrae, Adrienne Rich, David Wojnarowisz, Eileen Myles, and others.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333PM
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distrib. Rqmt; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Prereq: A 200-level creative writing course.
Notes: Meets the English department's seminar requirement.

Intermediate Literature Courses

ENGL-207 Topics in Science Writing

ENGL-207MG Topics in Science Writing: 'Imagining Illness'

Fall. Credits: 4

An exploration of the ways writers from a range of time periods and cultures represent--directly or metaphorically--illness and disease, diagnosis and treatment, suffering and healing. The course considers, as do growing numbers of medical educators and health professionals, the relations between interpretative skills and clinical practice, especially in attending to the stories both patients and texts try to tell. Readings will be selected from works by Berger, Edson, Fadiman, Grealy, Kafka, Lahiri, Lessing, Mann, McEwan, O'Neill, Saramago, Sontag, Sophocles, Williams, and Woolf.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Sutherland

ENGL-210 The Development of Literature in English: Medieval through Commonwealth

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A narrative of English literary history from the Old English period to the Restoration of the monarchy (700-1660), paying attention to works, authors, and genres, and to changes of language and culture. Readings include Beowulf, selections from The Canterbury Tales, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a Shakespeare play, and selections from such authors as Julian of Norwich, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, Sir Philip Sidney, John Donne, Andrew Marvell, and John Milton.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-211 Shakespeare

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

A study of some of Shakespeare's plays emphasizing the poetic and dramatic aspects of his art, with attention to the historical context and close, careful reading of the language. Eight or nine plays.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-281
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Rodgers, S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-212 English Renaissance Poetry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the literary period known as the English Renaissance. Through short lyric poems and some narrative verse, we will explore the era that saw the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, the Reformation of the Catholic church, the Scientific Revolution, and the exploration of the Americas. Reading an array of poets, we will immerse ourselves in the early modern world by exploring its representations of beauty, power, love, faith, art, and knowledge. Our emphasis will be on close reading, with a view to understanding form and appreciating excellence.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Roychoudhury
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.
Notes: Intended as an alternative to English 211; meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-213 The Literature of the Later Middle Ages

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine a variety of English works and genres written in the thirteenth through fifteenth centuries. Our concentration will be principally on the Gawain-poet, Chaucer, Langland, Margery Kempe, and Lydgate. Most of our readings are in Middle English.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-214 Topics in Medieval Studies

ENGL-214CM Topics in Medieval Studies: 'The Curious Middle Ages'

Fall. Credits: 4

While influenced by Augustine's warning that worldly inquiry could endanger the pilgrimage of the soul, medieval literature contains many instances of curious looking. Exploring the medieval desire to know, this course considers how the period's tendencies toward spiritual and metaphysical thought are balanced against its fascinations with the observable world. We will study the ways allegories, travel narratives, romances, and dream visions intersect with natural philosophy, historiography, cartography, and architecture. Literary analysis is the basis for our investigative work to uncover the epistemological impulses that inform medieval art and literature.

Crosslisted as: MEDST-217CM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Prereq: A first-year seminar.
Advisory: English 210, English 213, History 115, or History 232 recommended.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-214LR Topics in Medieval Studies: 'Love and Reason in Medieval Romance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Arthurian legend conjures enduring stereotypes of chivalry and romantic love, but how do we go about situating medieval romance in literary history? Where does it come from, why was it written, who read it, and how did it change over time? In this course, students will learn about romance's historical and social contexts, its form, tropes, and imagery. We will think about romance's contemplation of justice, loyalty, subjectivity, love, and shame, especially as this body of literature grapples with the conflicts that arise between the mortal and divine. Course readings will include works by Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Spenser. We will read in Middle English where possible.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Advisory: ENGL-210, ENGL-213, or MEDST-217 recommended.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-215 Chaucer's Literary World

Spring. Credits: 4

Who and what did Chaucer read? How did Chaucer's literary environment move him to explore love, human will, differences of perspective, and ideas of closure (the efficacy of complaint, poetic endings, and the poet's accomplishments). These topics will be studied in light of the ranging literary influences from the medieval world, especially Chaucer's adaptation of classical poetry, French and Italian vernacular verse, romance, saints' lives, allegory, and beast fables. All readings are in Middle English, concentrating on a selection of Chaucer's short poems and his major works prior to The Canterbury Tales.

Crosslisted as: MEDST-215
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Advisory: ENGL 213 or 214 strongly recommended
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-217 Topics in English

ENGL-217BF Topics in English: 'British and Irish Fiction 1900-1945'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines fiction by some of the key British and Irish writers from the first half of the twentieth century (1900-1945). We will be interested in the ways in which the form and content of the novel and the short story have been impacted by changes in social and cultural contexts. The course will cover topics such as the end of empire and the pervasive influence of music on modernist writers. The reading list will include works by James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield and Elizabeth Bowen.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. O'Callaghan
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.

ENGL-217GE Topics in English: 'Global English: Its Written and Spoken Forms'

Spring. Credits: 4

What is the relationship between language and social and political power? This course is an interdisciplinary study of the global role of the English language. Migration, education, and identity are major themes of the course, and we look at how linguists, policy-makers, and individuals grapple with these complex topics. This course also focuses on students' development of their written and spoken communication skills and is open to students in all disciplines. Our approach to writing and speaking may be particularly effective for students who do not identify as native speakers of English.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Shea

ENGL-217SC Topics in English: 'Stage to Screen'

Spring. Credits: 4

A study of ten to twelve plays and their film adaptations. Plays are drawn from a range of periods and genres, and films are chosen to show the scope of adaptive approaches from filmed play to radical re-imagining. The course will include readings on the theory and history of theatre-to-film adaptations. Playwrights will likely include Christopher Marlowe, Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, and David Henry Hwang.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-220SC; THEAT-234ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Prereq: 4 credits in English, Film Studies, or Theatre Arts.

ENGL-218 Topics in English

ENGL-220 Introduction to British Literary and Cultural Studies since 1660

This course offers a broad study of selected figures in modern literary and intellectual history and helps prepare students for more advanced classes in British and/or postcolonial studies. We will use these figures to probe the dynamic relationship between imaginative practice and social change, which may involve global as well as national contexts. This course will introduce students to writing sustained pieces of critical analysis, challenging them to explore the theoretical relationship between literary form and historical transformation in the modern period.

ENGL-220VP Introduction to British Literary and Cultural Studies since 1660: 'The Victorian Period'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the major ideas, shifts, expansions, and disruptions of the Victorian period. We will discuss prose, poetry, fiction, and art to understand how these forms engage with movements in voting rights, industry, living conditions, money, gender, definitions of class, and imperialist expansion. Writers may include Arnold, Carlyle, Martineau, Mill, Eliot, Dickens, Bronte, W. Collins, Browning, Rossetti, Hopkins, and many others, as well as painters and current readings in criticism and theory.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-223 United Colors of Neoliberal America

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What can Brown do for you? This question captures a central theme of this course: how a word like "Brown" evolved from a 1970s signifier of antiracist coalition building into a motto of the United Parcel Service (UPS), selling speed, efficiency, and access to networks of the global economy. Using interdisciplinary methods, we will explore the way multicultural imagery, Civil Rights discourse, and state policy have converged in the service of global capitalism. Focusing on fiction (egs. Octavia Butler, Karen Yamashita), film (egs. Crash, Sleep Dealers) and secondary sources, we will examine the impact of neoliberal multiculturalism and how cultural producers amplify and challenge its logics.

Crosslisted as: CST-223
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day

ENGL-225 Topics in Jewish Literature

ENGL-225TR Topics in Jewish Literature; 'Trauma, Transition and Memory: The Jewish Literary Imagination in the Twentieth Century'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course maps the range of Jewish literary expression in the Twentieth Century, Beginning with the folktales of Sholem Aleichem and parables and stories by Franz Kafka, we will move on to novels and films that explore Jewish family life across nations and historical eras (Eastern Europe, America, Israel). Among the core themes will be the literary response to the Shoah in works by Primo Levi, Aharon Appelfeld, and Anne Michaels. The course concludes with more recent works that continue to explore the relation among history, memory, and trauma -- core themes of Jewish experience in modern times.

Crosslisted as: JWST-225TR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Weber

ENGL-231 British Romanticism: Revolution and Reaction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class will examine the ways Romantic-era writers figured revolution and the reaction against it, in the wake of the French Revolution's spectacular but failed promises of liberty, fraternity, and equality for all. We will pay special attention to how British writers envisioned their own versions of freedom and equality, extending them to women, slaves, and the poor. Likewise we will explore how this project for social change was necessarily related to revolutions in language and aesthetics. Authors may include Burke, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Smith, Barbauld, Blake, Austen, Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Byron, and Hemans.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-234 Topics in Theatre Studies

ENGL-234SP Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Shakespeare in Performance: Case Studies in Stage Production History'

Spring. Credits: 4

To what purpose(s) have Shakespeare's plays been staged, and how has staging practice changed and developed? Our focus will be broad, covering such matters as acting, directing, design, history/criticism/dramaturgy. Units will include period/modern-dress Shakespeare, anti-realist staging, changing acting styles, "historically accurate" productions, "global Shakespeare," topical/political productions, and gender/race in casting. Several Key plays will form the core: Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Hamlet, and The Winter's Tale. The course will involve some attendance at live performance (likely a group trip to New York).

Crosslisted as: THEAT-234SP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Notes: Theatre tickets and food are the responsibility of the student. Cost of travel arrangements to New York is undetermined at this time.

ENGL-235 Modern British Poetry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This introduction to modern British poetry pays special attention to the emergence, consolidation, and dismantling of modernist poetry and poetics. It will link this literary history with, amongst other things, the loss of faith, the two world wars, and the relationship between monumental aesthetics, utopian poetics, and totalitarian politics. Writers will include Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, H.D., and Auden.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-238 Modern Irish Literature

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to the literature of modern Ireland beginning with Swift, moving through the nineteenth century, examining the Irish Literary Revival and Irish modernism, and finally contemporary drama, poetry, and fiction. We will focus on Irish women writers and their literary interventions concerning colonial history, nationalism, and Unionism. We will pay particular attention to representations of Irishness, the relationship between literature and national history, and questions of violence and representation. The course will explore how the genres, styles, and forms of Irish writing are determined by the experience of colonial trauma and the imperative to imagine national identity.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.

ENGL-239 Novels of the Later Eighteenth Century

ENGL-239WH Novels of the Later Eighteenth Century: 'Worthy Hearts and Saucy Wits'

Fall. Credits: 4

Eighteenth-century England witnessed the birth of the novel, a genre that in its formative years was both lauded for its originality and condemned as intellectually and morally dangerous, especially for young women. We will trace the numerous prose genres that influenced early novelists, including conduct manuals, epistolary writing, conversion narratives, travelogues, romance, and the gothic. In doing so, we will concomitantly examine the novel's immense formal experimentation alongside debates about developing notions of gender and class as well as the feeling, thinking individual. Authors may include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, Burney, and others.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204WH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-240 American Literature I

Fall. Credits: 4

A survey of American literature from the literature of exploration through the major authors of the mid-nineteenth century, with special attention to the formation of an American literary tradition, along with the political, social, and religious context that helped shape the imaginative response of American writers to their culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-241 American Literature II

Spring. Credits: 4

A continuation of English 240, which explores the diversity of writers and literary forms that arose in the United States during the decades after the Civil War. Authors may include Twain, Chopin, Dunbar-Nelson, Stephen Crane, Wharton, Du Bois, James, Jewett, Stein, and Cather. The course will address the development of realism, naturalism, and modernism while exploring literary redefinitions of race, gender, sexuality, and class as shaped by changing social pressures.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-242 Topics in American Literature

ENGL-242AE Topics in American Literature: 'The American Essay'

Spring. Credits: 4

Throughout the history of the United States, the essay has been a vital literary genre. From religious and confessional essays to personal, political, and satirical ones, American authors have explored their passions and hatreds in this flexible form. We will read essays from the nineteenth century to the present, with the opportunity to write essays of our own. Authors may include Thoreau, Baldwin, Didion, and Maggie Nelson, along with international writers, such as Woolf and Zadie Smith, who have influenced American essayists.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-243 American Gothic

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An examination of the gothic--a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity--in American literature and culture, with an emphasis upon issues of race and gender. Topics include slavery and the gothic; gothic sexuality; Southern, Northern, and national gothic; freakishness and grotesquerie; and visual gothic. Focus on fiction, with some film and photography. Authors, filmmakers, and artists may include Alcott, Arbus, Browning, Crane, Dunbar, Dunn, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Kubrick, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Oates, Parks, Poe, Romero, Turner, and Wood.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-220AG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-251 Contemporary African American Literature II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine African American literature and culture in the postwar period as American identities are coalescing around the concept of the US as a world power. Specifically, our task during the semester will be to discuss the myriad ways black authors and artists attempt to interrogate the structure of racial hegemony by creating poetry and prose meant to expand notions of culture and form. We will also examine music, visual art, and advertisements from this era to have a greater sense of the black experience through various cultural representations. Writers will include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Michael S. Harper and bell hooks.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-251
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown

ENGL-265 Children's and Young Adult Literature

ENGL-265CL Children's and Young Adult Literature: 'A View from Childhood to the World'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the field of history of American Literature for youth with an emphasis on literature from the 1960s to the current day. Students will read diverse literature from multiple genres and engage in thoughtful analysis of the literature as it reflects the historical, cultural, psychological and sociological nature of American society past, present, or future.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Richards
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level.

ENGL-267 Reading and Writing in the World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Most people are on the world, not in it.' --John Muir. An introduction to reading and writing about nature, this seminar will attempt an exchange across distinct approaches to observing and describing the world around us. Do lenses of culture, discipline, and gender determine how we see and experience nature, environment, and place? Course work will include reading such authors as N. Scott Momaday, Henry David Thoreau, bell hooks, Leslie Marmon Silko, Mary Oliver, Terry Tempest Williams, Wendell Berry, and Annie Dillard; field trips; and writing assignments--weekly field notes and journals, analytical papers, and personal essays.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-267
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form

ENGL-274 Introduction to Asian American Literature

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to Asian American literature, considering its historical origins and evolution. Throughout the course we explore questions of identity, immigration and citizenship, generational conflict, war and migration, and mixed and cross-racial politics. Readings of primary texts will be supplemented by historical and critical source materials. Authors may include Nina Revoyr, Ruth Ozeki, Nam Le, Chang-rae Lee, Aimee Phan, Susan Choy, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
I. Day

ENGL-276 Mapping Jewish American Generations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course sets canonical Jewish American literature in creative dialogue with contemporary Jewish American writers, filmmakers, and performance artists to explore how early twentieth-century figures (Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, and Henry Roth) continue to influence --inspire--a rising generation of authors. The key mediating figure in this generational dialogue is Philip Roth, whose work we will examine as well. Topics to be explored include "immigrant" writing then and now; the uses of nostalgia; genealogies of standup comedy and popular culture in general; the emergence of "hipster" Judaism and its various modes of expression (above all via social media).

Crosslisted as: JWST-276
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Weber
Prereq: 4 credits in English, religion, Jewish studies, history, sociology, or film studies.

ENGL-280 Literary and Cultural Theory

Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to literary and cultural theory with an emphasis on twentieth century and contemporary thought. We will explore crucial questions that have focused, and continue to focus, critical debate. These questions may include representation, subjectivity, ideology, identity, difference, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout we will be particularly interested in the ways in which language and form mediate and construct social experience.

Crosslisted as: CST-280
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-283 Graphic Narrative

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine form and theme in the graphic narrative. Focusing on a small group of contemporary memoirs and novels, we will also analyze some antecedents, such as the early twentieth-century 'wordless novel'; relevant works in other media, such as documentary film; and selected secondary criticism. Topics will include: relations between word and image; constructions of time, space, and sequence; representations of gender and sexuality; depictions of memory, archive, and history. Authors, filmmakers, and critics may include Barry, Bechdel, Chute, Eisner, McCloud, Pekar, Satrapi, Spiegelman, Ward, and Ware.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-286 Sexuality and Women's Writing

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An examination of how U.S. women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first century represent sexuality in prose. Topics to include: lesbian, queer, homoerotic, and transgender possibilities; literary strategies for encoding sexuality, including modernist experiment and uses of genre; thematic interdependencies between sexuality and race; historical contexts, including the 'inversion' model of homosexuality and the Stonewall rebellion. Authors studied may include Barnes, Bechdel, Cather, Chopin, Feinberg, Highsmith, Jackson, Larsen, McCullers, Moraga, Nestle, Stein, and Truong; supplemental critical readings may include Butler, Lorde, Rich, and Sedgwick.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204SW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

Advanced Literature Courses

ENGL-311 Chaucer: Stories & Storytellers

ENGL-311CT Chaucer: 'The Canterbury Tales'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Known as a storyteller par excellence, Chaucer was also a famous reader of classical epic, romance, and philosophy. This research seminar will give students the opportunity to read the Canterbury Tales in light of the work's cultural, historical, and literary contexts. Throughout the semester, students will engage with Chaucer's tales and his favorite sources to examine and discuss his representations of gender and class, his perspectives on religious authority, his use of the English vernacular, and his commitment to poetry.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.
Advisory: English 210 or 213 recommended
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-312 Shakespeare

ENGL-312SF Shakespeare: 'Shakespeare and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will read plays by Shakespeare, watch films based on those plays, and study the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. 'Shakespeare' comes first, of course, both historically and as the source/inspiration for the films. Yet each film has its own existence, to be understood not just as an 'adaptation,' but also as the product of linked artistic, technical, and economic choices. Considering Shakespeare's plays as pre-texts (rather than pre-scriptions), we will look at early and recent films, both those that follow closely conventionalized conceptualizations of 'Shakespeare,' and those that tend to erase or emend their Shakespearean sources.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-380SF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level, including ENGL-211.
Notes: Note: this section does not meet the English department pre-1700 requirement; does not meet the English department seminar requirement

ENGL-317 Studies in Renaissance Literature

ENGL-317MD Studies in Renaissance Literature: 'Early Modern Drama'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

All the world's a stage." This course surveys the era of literary history that invented this powerful idea. The drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is obsessively self-conscious, bursting with disguises, confidence tricks, cross-dressers, masques, and plays-within-plays. Reading several playwrights, we will situate Shakespeare among his rivals and peers: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others. More generally, we will explore early modern notions of performance and theatricality, considering how they were entwined in conceptions of desire, evil, gender, and politics.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-334EA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Prereq: Take 4 credits in Renaissance studies.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-317MJ Studies in Renaissance Literature: 'Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton'

Spring. Credits: 4

A seminar on three major early modern dramatists--Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton--focusing on the range of genres, characters, conflicts, and aspirations explored in their plays. These playwrights, along with their contemporary Shakespeare, shaped the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century theatre into a site for performing authority and conquest, national and individual identity, trickery and carnival, desire and sexuality, and complex unfoldings of revenge. Readings of several plays by each of the three dramatists will be supplemented by recent studies of early modern theatricality.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-350MJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200 and ENGL-210 or ENGL-211.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-317TR Studies in Renaissance Literature: 'Trauma in the Premodern World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

When told that his wife's madness cannot be cured, Macbeth asks: 'Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased?' Although the term 'trauma' was not used to describe a psychological state until the nineteenth century, Macbeth's query suggests that premodern subjects both understood and experienced the sorts of psychic injury the term denotes. This course will explore how trauma was discerned, expressed and represented in premodern European culture. Readings will include contemporary theoretical explorations of trauma, as well as works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Aphra Behn, and Daniel Defoe.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200 and ENGL-210 or ENGL-211.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-319 The Renaissance

ENGL-319SR The Renaissance: 'Literature and Science, 1516-1674'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar traces intersections between literary art and scientific knowledge at the dawn of modernity, when the difference between "art" and "science" was anything but clear. We will read prominent works of English Renaissance literature (Shakespeare, Donne, Milton) alongside various scientific and philosophical writings (Lucretius, Bacon, Descartes) as well as major milestones of the Scientific Revolution (Vesalius, Copernicus, Galileo). In so doing, we will ponder what connects aesthetic and empirical forms of truth. Topics will include magic and the occult, alchemy, astronomy, anatomy and medicine, atoms and theories of matter, the scientific method, natural history, and technology.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 4 credits in Renaissance studies.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-321 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature

ENGL-321WD Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: 'William Wordsworth and George Eliot'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

William Wordsworth and George Eliot grew up in a revolutionary age: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, wars of independence and of imperial conquest, and, behind it all, the social transformations arising from the industrial revolution. Both Wordsworth and Eliot wrestled with how to adapt their art to these new realities: he introduced dramatically new content into poetry and experimented with a startling variety of poetic forms; she transformed the various prose genres to construct a novelistic form able to represent the totality of British society. By so doing, they forged a revolution in literary forms with the emergence of the modern lyric and the realist novel.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Prereq: 8 credits from English.
Notes: meets the English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-323 The Victorian Novel

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will explore the Victorian novel within the larger context of nineteenth century Britain, paying particular attention to the ways in which it develops in relation to changing ideas about class, gender, sexuality, nation, and culture. Novelists will include Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, and Gaskell.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-324 British Literature Since 1945

ENGL-325 Victorian Literature and Visual Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine literary texts that represent new forms of visuality in nineteenth-century Britain as well as examples of visual culture that provide a framework for reading Victorian culture in innovative ways. We will study nineteenth-century photography--portraiture, prison photography, imperial photographs, and private and popular erotic images--as well as novels and autobiographical writing that engage with new photographic technology and its transformation of the ways in which Victorians understood identity, politics, aesthetics, and representation. The course will take a similar approach to painting, literary illustration, political cartoons and caricature, and advertising.

Crosslisted as: CST-349VC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: ENGL-220 or ENGL-323 and at least 4 credits from art history or film studies.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-327 Seminar in the Literature of the Romantic Period

ENGL-328 Woolf, Auden, and Modernism

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will chart the development of Modernism in poetry and prose by examining the careers of two of the most important writers in the first half of the twentieth-century: the novelist, Virginia Woolf and the poet, W. H. Auden. We will focus on the way both writers initially seek to wrestle into representation new content within the frame of pre-existing forms and, by so doing, discover that these forms are inadequate or buckle under the strain and need to be revised, renewed, and transformed.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman
Prereq: 8 credits from English.

ENGL-329 Multicultural London: 1950-2015

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores how London has emerged as a rich site of literature and popular culture, a multicultural contact zone drawing writers and filmmakers to the metropolitan center of the former imperial Empire. It focuses on Britain's more recent experience of migration, displacement, and transplantation. The course examines how contemporary writers investigate the meaning of 'Englishness,' along with their own vexed relation to British history and identity. Authors include Sam Selvon, V.S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi, Andrea Levy, Zadie Smith, Caryl Phillips, and Neel Mukherjee. Films include My Beautiful Laundrette, My Son the Fanatic, and Anita and Me.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Weber
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

ENGL-334 Asian American Film and Visual Culture

ENGL-334BG Asian American Film and Visual Culture: 'Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu Masters'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines contemporary Asian American film and visual culture through the lens of cultural recovery, self-invention, and experimentation. Focusing primarily on film and photography, we will explore issues of race and visuality, Hollywood orientalism, memory and postmemory, and racial impersonation and parody. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. Artists may include Nikki S. Lee, Margaret Cho, Tseng Kwong Chi, Jin-me Yoon, Justin Lin, Binh Dahn, Richard Fung, Mira Nair, Deepa Mehta, and Alice Wu.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-320BG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-337 The Political Imagination in Contemporary South Africa

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar examines the variety of literary and cultural expression in South Africa since the 1970s, focusing on the relations between art and political struggle. Among the topics to be discussed are the imagination of history in South African literature; the emergence of the Black Consciousness movement (and its legacies); responses to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Among the authors to be studied are Nadine Gordimer, J.M. Coeztee, Njabulo Ndebele, Zoe Wicomb, and Zakes Mda, along with a number of contemporary poets, playwrights, and filmmakers.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Weber
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits at the 300 level in English, history, politics, or related fields.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-339 The Visual Culture of Protest

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines social protests from the perspective of the visual. Examining cultural productions from 1948-2015 we will focus on the geographical specificity of planned and spontaneous protests that have mobilized people into action. We will use a black studies framework to engage the possibilities present in resisting disparate power structures of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region. Artists, musicians, activists, writers, and grassroots organizers of social movements have been ever cognizant of the role of the visual in subverting power structures. We will use this opportunity to place visual culture at the center of a conversation concerning resistance, human rights, political agency, citizenship, and freedom.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-339, CST-339
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-199/ENGL-200 or AFCNA-200.

ENGL-341 American Literature III

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the range and variety of American literary expression from the 1920s through the early 1940s. Topics include the role of regionalism; the emergence of a 'modernist' aesthetic; ethnicity and modernism; debates within African American literary culture. Authors include Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Henry Roth, and Pietro Di Donato.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Prereq: 8 credits from the department.

ENGL-345 Studies in American Literature

ENGL-345FD Studies in American Literature: Seminar: 'Revisiting the American Family Drama'

Fall. Credits: 4

Dramas focused on the always-fraught dynamics of the family have dominated American theatre since the appearance of Royall Tyler's "The Contrast" in 1789. This course examines the trajectory and endurance of the form, from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century works through realist, avant-garde, and absurdist plays of the twentieth century, and on to the adoption and revision of the form by writers of color and by gay, lesbian, and transgender artists. Dramatists include Eugene O'Neill, Zona Gale, Langston Hughes, Tennessee Williams, Maria Irene Fornes, Sam Shepard, Christopher Durang, Sung Rno, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, MJ Kaufman, Stephen Karam, A. Rey Pamatmat, and Taylor Mac.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-350FD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
H. Holder
Prereq: 8 credits in department.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-345HJ Studies in American Literature: 'Henry James on Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will examine the various screen adaptations of assorted novels by Henry James. We will read the novels against the films, exploring how James's texts translate--or do not translate-- into film. Novels and films to be studied include Washington Square, The Europeans, Portrait of a Lady, The Turn of the Screw, and Wings of the Dove.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-380HJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
D. Weber
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from the department.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-345RG Studies in American Literature: 'Race, Region & Ethnicity in Modern American Literature'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the range and variety of American literary expression from the 1920s through the early 1940s. Topics include the role of regionalism; the emergence of a "modernist" aesthetic; ethnicity and modernism; debates within African American literary culture. Authors include Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Henry Roth, and Pietro Di Donato.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Weber
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-345RW Studies in American Literature: 'Richard Wright: Career and Influence'

Spring. Credits: 4

The first half of this seminar examines the major works of Richard Wright, including Uncle Tom's Children, 12 Million Black Voices, Native Son, Black Boy, and Black Power. The second half explores Wright's literary influence along with his political legacy to a range of modern and contemporary authors, including Zora Neale Hurston, Chester Himes, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Weber
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from the department.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-346 Irish Gothic

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This advanced seminar will study the gothic as a genre and as a malleable yet persistent discursive site in Irish literary and political tradition. From the eighteenth century to the present, the gothic has been used to explore aspects of Irish history, in particular colonialism. The course will focus on texts that engage with three primary problems that the Irish gothic is used to explore: violence and terror, famine, and vampirism as a political metaphor. We will read novels, short fiction, poetry, and archival newspaper writing, including work by Maturin, Edgeworth, Lady Wilde, Mangan, LeFanu, Stoker, Joyce, Bowen, Enright, Deane, Boland, and Heaney.

Crosslisted as: CST-346
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: online application required
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-347 Modern Urban British Novel

Fall. Credits: 4

As London and the British novel enter the new millennium, both are sites of competing histories, traditions, and agendas. This course will map the city's progress from the center of an empire to a node in the global world's economy, and chart the twentieth-century novel's movement from realism to postmodernism and beyond. Beginning by contrasting the realist London of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes with Virginia Woolf's modernist version in Mrs. Dalloway, we will go on to trace the development of the post-1945 British novel.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English including ENGL-199/ENGL-200.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-349 Cosmopolitanism

Spring. Credits: 4

Nothing that is human can be alien to me." This is the motto of cosmopolitanism, a philosophy first formed by the Greeks, which emphasizes our common status as citizens of the world and urges us to value the universal as highly as the local. Today, this view can seem naïve: is it advisable, even possible, to privilege absent strangers and lofty ideals above the needs of those nearby? This course considers the promise and perils of cosmopolitanism through the lens of contemporary transnational literature-through representations of immigration, asylum, transnational capital, tourism, terrorism, and environmentalism. Authors may include Rushdie, Naipaul, Coetzee, Adichie, Hemon, and Bulawayo.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: does not fulfill the English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-350 Studies in African American Literature

ENGL-350TM Topics in African American Literature: 'Toni Morrison'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the work and the centralized black world of the last American Nobel laureate in literature, Toni Morrison. Morrison is the author of eleven novels and multiple other works, including nonfiction and criticism. In a career that has spanned over forty years and has informed countless artists and writers, Morrison's expansive cultural reach can hardly be measured accurately. In this course we will endeavor to critically analyze the arc and the import of many of Morrison's writings. Readings include: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Jazz, Playing in the Dark, Paradise, and A Mercy.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-341TM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Bailey
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Notes: meets English dept seminar requirement

ENGL-351 Sex, Race, and the Visual

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines categories of race, gender, sex, and sexuality through the lens of the visual. Using contemporary literature, photography, performance art, film, and theories of the visual, our task is to investigate the import and utility of embodiment. How do race, gender, and sexuality function in the artistic imaginary? What can we glean from cultural productions that engage the viewer/reader in ways that challenge ideas about conformity, fluidity, belonging, and self-reflection? More than a linear literary or theoretical trajectory, this course will provide a template for all the mechanisms of the visual--psychological and ocular, interpretive, rhetorical and performative.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-351
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200.

ENGL-353 Readings in Literary Biography

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Biography is both a literary genre and a mode of literary scholarship. This course will explore some varieties of the biographical impulse in both fiction and nonfiction. We will begin with eighteenth-century British models: Samuel Johnson's Lives of the English Poets and James Boswell's Life of Johnson. Then we will turn to ideas of biography and literary portraiture in the work of Henry James and Gertrude Stein. We will explore the shift associated with the advent of Freud and the Bloomsbury innovations of Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf, and with close attention to recent experiments in biography by writers such as Janet Malcolm, Rachel Cohen, and Richard Holmes.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from the department.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-354 Vindicated: The Wollstonecraft-Shelley Circle

Fall. Credits: 4

The dynamic mother-daughter duo of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley is often read as part of the "Godwin-Shelley circle," a cadre of writers circulating around their respective literary husbands. This course will place them at the center of literary innovation, examining their expansive work in multiple genres. Asking what it means to be ardent and provocative women writers during this period, we will discuss their radical politics, their gender theories, and their ideas about literature intervening in the public sphere. We will also consider short pieces by others in their circle, potentially including Godwin, P. Shelley, Mary Hayes, Mary Robinson, Claire Claremont, and Byron.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-367CM Topics in Film Studies: 'Cinematic Masculinities in Contemporary American Film, 1970-present'

Spring. Credits: 4

Film critics Manohla Dargis and A.O. Scott contend that "movies may be male dominated, but images of men are surprisingly narrow." This course both explores various constructs of postmodern American masculinity as they are portrayed and disseminated through contemporary film, and seeks to understand some of what is at stake (culturally, ideologically, economically) in perpetuating certain cinematic archetypes. Of particular relevance to our investigation are the ways in which film yokes masculinity to race, gender, and class. Films include The Deer Hunter, The Godfather, The Big Lebowski, Boyz in the Hood, Paris is Burning, Fight Club, and Moonlight.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-320CM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: ENGL-199 or FLMST-201.
Notes: fulfills English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-373 Women in American Literature

ENGL-373DH Women in American Literature: 'Desperate Housewives in 19th- through early 20th-century American Literature'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will explore visual and literary images of nineteenth through early 20th-century marriage and motherhood. Discussion of Virginia's Woolf's 'A Room of One's Own' and Barbara Welter's essay 'The Cult of True Womanhood' will serve as the springboard for our focus on representations of women in the home. We will incorporate a visit to the art museum, and will analyze film adaptations of some of the texts we read. The course will focus primarily on American literature, film, and art, with the exception of Ibsen's A Doll's House; selected written texts will include works by writers such as Hawthorne, James, Stowe, Gilman, Freeman, Chopin, Hurston, and Wharton.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333DH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-374 Hitchcock and After

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Mamie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-380HA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film Studies and 4 credits in English.
Notes: meets English Department seminar requirement; film screenings Mondays, 7:00-10:00 pm

ENGL-377 Feminist Poetics: The Poetess, Prophet, and Revolutionary

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will explore innovations in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century women's verse. By investigating experiments with narrative, genre, stanza form, meter, and figurative language, we will contemplate what political, social, and ideological problems women writers attempted to present and perhaps solve through linguistic creativity. Larger questions include how to define 'feminist poetics' and what potential such a project might afford poets and thinkers today. To this end, we will read selections of poetry in conversation with contemporary feminist theory as well as representations of women's incantation, prophecy, and singing by male poets and novelists of the day.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333PR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from English and/or Gender Studies beyond the 100 level.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-381 Film Melodrama and Horror

Fall. Credits: 4

An examination of classic and contemporary works in two important film genres, melodrama and horror. Topics of particular interest: affinities as well as contrasts between genres; feminist analyses and uses of genre; normative and alternative representations of sexualities; genre and the representations of race; spectatorship and the production of affect - tears and screams - by these genres. Extensive readings in film studies and cultural theory. Directors may include Almodóvar, Cronenberg, Curtiz, DePalma, Hitchcock, Kent, Lee, Onwurah, Polanski, Ray, Romero, Sirk, Vidor, and Whale.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-360MH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film Studies and 4 credits in English.
Notes: enrollment may be limited; fulfills the English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-382 Topic

ENGL-382PW Topic: 'Once More With Feeling: Intimacies and Affects in a Posthuman World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Affect theory offers a varied and rich critical language to explore how emotion circulates within and among human bodies-and nonhuman ones as well. If emotions operate through bodily changes and chemical exchanges, then animals and nonhumans might similarly be seen as bodies replete with affective materials in motion and at rest. In this course we will read through an array of affect theory from cognitive science, animal studies, and posthumanist debates on the affect of objects. We will consider how humans know what they feel (and when), how animals love, how forests think, and how affects might cross human and nonhuman boundaries.

Crosslisted as: CST-349PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Prior experience with theory is helpful but not necessary.

ENGL-383 Reading James Joyce

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will include all of James Joyce's major works: Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake (extracts). Students will be encouraged to explore the oral, interpretative, performative, and musical aspects of Joyce's writing. The texts will be explored in the context of politics and colonialism, and will be contextualized through discussions of modernism, postmodernism, and the Irish literary tradition.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. O'Callaghan
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Advisory: English 217BF, English 324, and/or English 346 highly recommended
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-392 Advanced Topics in English

ENGL-394 Advanced Topics in English

ENGL-394MN Advanced Topics in English: 'Music and the Irish Novel'

Fall. Credits: 4

Music and the Irish Novel introduces students to Irish novelists from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. In these novels music plays a significant role, as a thematic, formal, or aesthetic inspiration. Traditional, opera, ballads, jazz, classical, pop, and contemporary music; all play a role in this literature. What do we mean when we say that a language, or a piece of literature, is "musical"? Why do writers of contemporary historical fiction favor musical references? This intertextual link will lead to inquiries into the role of music in prose fiction, and in particular in the Irish novel.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. O'Callaghan
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Advisory: English 217BF, English 324, and/or English 346 highly recommended

Independent Study

ENGL-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENGL-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.