Theatre Arts (THEAT)

THEAT-100 Introduction to Theatre

Fall. Credits: 4

Taught by Department of Theatre Arts faculty and staff, this course offers the student a study and practice of theatre as a collaborative art. Course includes the analysis of the dramatic text in terms of the actor; the director; the scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designers; and technicians. Close analytical readings of play texts and critical/theoretical essays will be supplemented by attending theatre productions both on and off campus and by staging students' own theatrical projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Notes: requirement for the Theatre major

THEAT-105 Acting I

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course will focus on basic Stanislavski techniques: concentration, imagination, relaxation, objective/action, and beats/scene analysis. Each student will apply these concepts to one open scene, one monologue and one realistic contemporary scene.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja

THEAT-120 Topics in Design

THEAT-120CC Topics in Design: 'Costume Construction'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course take students through the theatrical process of creating clothing and accessories for the stage. Topics covered are hand sewing techniques, fabric identification and use, and clothing alterations . The course will explore basic pattern drafting and draping, and some accessory construction. Students will work from costume renderings to build and alter clothing for Rooke Theatre productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Bergeron
Notes: lab; materials fee $45

THEAT-122 Scene Design I

Fall. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and work of the set designer in the performing arts. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how this work impacts a production, and what means are used in the execution of the process. They will learn how to develop their own visual imaginations and how to create visual concepts through discussions, renderings, models and some hand drafting. No previous experience in theatre, performance, or the visual arts is required.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Notes: lab; materials fee of $50. Theatre tickets and any additional purchase of design supplies and materials is the responsibility of the student

THEAT-124 Costume Design I

Fall. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and work of the costume designer in the performing arts. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how the designer's work impacts a production, and what methods are used in the execution of the design process. Students will learn how to develop their own visual imaginations and how to create visual concepts through discussions and renderings.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Advisory: No previous experience in theatre, performance, or the visual arts is required.
Notes: lab; $30 materials fee. Any additional purchase of design supplies and materials is the responsibility of the student

THEAT-126 Lighting Design I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and practice of lighting design for the theatre. This course will cover the basics of light, lighting equipment and how to develop a design for a theatrical production. Students will have the opportunity to use the Black Box Light Lab to create their own lighting designs from selected scenes of plays and musicals and learn the basics of programming a computerized lighting board. Students enrolled in this class will automatically be signed up for the Theatre Arts Department Light Prep Crew for the semester, where students learn to hang and focus lights on the Rooke Stage for the department's mainstage productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Dubin

THEAT-127 Intro to Lighting and Sound Design

Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and practice of lighting & sound design for the theatre. This course will cover the basic tools and techniques of designing light & sound and provide an understanding of the designer's role in the collaborative process of producing a show. Students will have the opportunity to create their own lighting & sound designs in the Black Box classroom and present them to the class. In addition to class time students are required to complete 24 hours of light prep crew - this is an extension of the class where students will learn how to hang and focus lights, read a light plot, and work as a lighting team on the Theatre Department main stage productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Dubin
Notes: Purchase of theatre tickets is the responsibility of the student.

THEAT-171 Studies in Dance History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to present an overview of dance as a performing art in the twentieth century. Through readings, video and film viewings, guest performances, individual research projects, and classroom discussions, students will explore principles and traditions of twentieth-century concert dance traditions, with special attention to their historical and cultural contexts. Special topics may include European and American ballet, the modern dance movement, contemporary and avant-garde experimentation, African American dance forms, jazz dance, and other cultural dance traditions.

Crosslisted as: DANCE-171
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Flachs

THEAT-180 Introduction to Technical Theatre

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the materials and techniques used in building and operating theatrical scenery. It will include prop building, rigging, and welding for the theatre. Students will learn the skills to work in the scene shop interpreting scenic designs for department productions.

Crosslisted as: ARTST-137TC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Hill
Notes: Lab. Supplies fee of $40 for material. Theatre tickets are the responsibility of the student.

THEAT-205 Acting II

Fall. Credits: 4

A continuation of techniques developed in Acting I. Concentration is on scene work with 'classic' and contemporary realist playwrights, i.e., Chekhov, Ibsen, Williams, Churchill, Kane, etc. Students will perform at least four scenes using the Stanislavski method as their base. Practical tools explored in class are intended to offer the student greater vocal, physical, and imaginative freedom and clarity, as well as text analysis skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja, The department
Prereq: THEAT-105.

THEAT-215 Topics in Performance

This course offers a specific approach to performing. Topics include mask characterization, physical theatre techniques, acting Shakespeare, and vocal training, among others.

Instructor permission required.

THEAT-215CP Topics in Performance: 'Intermediate Composition'

Spring. Credits: 4

Intermediate Composition is structured as a workshop for you to explore and expand your own artistic vision. It will increase your understanding of inspiration and intention as they relate to choreography as well as encourage active consideration of choreographic possibilities for space, time, performer/audience interaction, energetic qualities, use of text, music, and physical and environmental intelligences.

Crosslisted as: DANCE-252
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Physical Education
C. Salyers
Prereq: DANCE-151 or equivalent choreographic experience.

THEAT-215CV Topics in Performance: 'Choreography of Violence'

Spring. Credits: 4

Through a series of readings, classroom exercises, and performances this course will focus on giving students a strong foundation in stage combat techniques, including basic martial training, unarmed combat, knife work, and sword and dagger work. Students will then use this foundation to choreograph a series of scenes, while incorporating special effects meant to heighten the violence of the scenes. Special effect techniques explored may include, blood work, scarring, burns, etc. Students must be comfortable analyzing scenes of violence from contemporary film and stage and be prepared to work in a highly physical setting.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Notes: Materials fee $25

THEAT-215VP Topics in Performance: 'Voice for Performance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Linklater voice and Alexander Technique will be the tools used to lay the groundwork for healthy, natural, dependable and expressive vocal communication and postural ease for theatre and public speaking. Students will learn how to speak with poise, gain confidence, reduce performance anxiety, and build the range, resonance, and authenticity of their voice and person. Poetry and dramatic texts will be used.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Rootberg
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Permission of department Chair
Notes: Students enrolled for Voice and Movement for the Stage Fall 2013 may take this course.

THEAT-220 Topics in Design

Various topics in theatrical design, or in related design fields, including theory, practice, and history. Subjects may include opera performance and design, costume crafts, and materials and techniques, among others.

THEAT-220BC Topics in Design: 'Costume Crafts: Costumes Beyond Clothing'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designed to explore the art of costume crafts vs. costume clothing, this course teaches students how to create dimensional objects through the use of flat patterning. Students explore how craft work utilizes ways in which sculpture, painting, color theory, sewing, pattern drafting, costume research and theory all come together. Millinery, armor, masks, fabric painting and dyeing, as well as body sculpting will be covered.

Crosslisted as: ARTST-226BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Bergeron
Advisory: Hand and machine sewing helpful.
Notes: Lab fee $60.

THEAT-220CH Topics in Design: 'Costume History for the Costume Designer'

Spring. Credits: 4

Research-driven weekly discussions on the history of Western clothing as it intersects with social, political and technological changes, and drawing sessions using the Mount Holyoke Antique Clothing Collection. Course covers clothing circa 1100-2016.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Pangburn

THEAT-220DF Topics in Design: 'Design for Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The class will study the development of Art Direction and Costume Design for Film and Television from their beginnings in the Twentieth Century to the present. Students will engage in an investigation of the field through written work, visual presentations and practical projects.

Crosslisted as: FLMST-220DF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James

THEAT-220DN Topics in Design: 'The Domestic Interior'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A visual history of domestic life, cultural and social intercourse related to dramatic literature and film. Students will learn how to identify the place and the period of domestic interiors through style, form, and pattern. They will study the impact of social, economic and family organizations on living spaces and their use. Topics discussed will include classical revivals, the China trade, the industrial revolution, European country houses, American colonial farms, and living with modern technology. Students will be required to prepare papers with visual presentations. The course will include site visits to houses and museums.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James

THEAT-220DR Topics in Design: 'Drawing for Theatrical Set and Costume Design'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an investigation into the fundamentals of drawing for costume and set design, with illustration of visual ideas as the focus. Topics will include figure drawing, garment, fabric, and texture rendering for the purposes of costume design, and scale and perspective drawing of objects and environments for set design. Various media will be explored including pencil, paint, and mixed media collage.

Crosslisted as: ARTST-226SC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Ford
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: THEAT-122 or ARTST-120 or ARTST-116.
Notes: Lab fee of $50 for materials retained by student.

THEAT-222 Scene Design II

Spring. Credits: 4

Students will study and compare the work of significant designers, and use this research to inspire and inform the growth of their own work. They will familiarize themselves with the best contemporary practices through reading current articles, reviews and critiques. They will develop a design project for inclusion in a portfolio and will gain a working knowledge of Photoshop, InDesign, and Vectorworks. They will assistant design for the department's spring musical Cabaret. There will be an intensive weekend field trip to New York City and students will exhibit and present their semester's work in the final class.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Prereq: THEAT-100 and THEAT-122.
Notes: materials fee $50. Any additional purchase of design supplies and materials is the responsibility of the student

THEAT-224 Costume Design II

Spring. Credits: 4

Through practical and studio work, students will refine their creative process to industry standards. Course covers text and character analysis, drawing, painting and the designer's responsibility.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Pangburn
Prereq: THEAT-124.
Notes: Lab fee for materials $50.

THEAT-227 Lighting and Sound Design II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Taking basic lighting and sound design skills to the next level, this course will provide a more in-depth study of the skills needed to design lighting and sound for the theatre. Students will have the opportunity to focus on their main area of interest - lighting or sound - or continue study in both subjects. In addition to individual design projects presented in the Black Box classroom, there will be active participation in the light and sound designs of the department productions, along with possible student productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Dubin

THEAT-234 Topics in Theatre Studies

THEAT-234AD Topics in Theatre Studies: 'American Drama, 1787 to Present'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers a broad survey of American drama in the context of performance traditions such as minstrelsy, melodrama, realism, the Broadway musical, and the avant-garde. We read works that challenge and expand concepts of national identity and their connection to discourses of race, class, ethnicity, and gender. How do the characters and landscapes of these plays reflect historical events and theatrical inventions? What do they tell us about what it means to be an 'American,' and how have our answers changed over time? Playwrights will include Tyler, Baker, Aiken, Brown, Boucicault, O'Neill, Stein, Hurston, Wilder, Williams, Miller, Shepard, Kennedy, Wilson, Kushner, and Parks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle

THEAT-234CW Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Dream of the Red Chamber, Story of the Western Chamber, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-215, GNDST-204CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English

THEAT-234DA Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Danger, Rules and Riots: Theatre and Performance Theory, Criticism, and Controversies'

Spring. Credits: 4

What and whom is theatre for? How might viewing a performance be dangerous? What rules govern theatre, and who makes them? Who should play what role? In this course we analyze major theoretical and performance texts, explore censorship, and investigate theatrical controversies. Readings (supplemented by video materials) to include both theory and drama, with a particular focus on disputes over what can be said and seen and on the politics of representation. Case studies include the judgment against Corneille's "Le Cid", the "Playboy riots" at Dublin's Abbey Theatre, disputes over race and gender in casting, and the vexed matter of selecting works for high school and college performance.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
H. Holder

THEAT-234GT Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Greek Tragedy and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the evolution of tragedy in classical Athens from choral performance to sophisticated drama through the contributions of the three most important tragedians: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Attention is given both to the political context in which the plays were performed and to the dramatic effects employed by the playwrights that made the stage an influential medium of powerful artistry. Students will also study the influence of ancient tragedy on film by examining dramatic strategies modern directors employ and the allusions to Greek tragedy found in some innovative films by Roman Polanski, Woody Allen, Jules Dassin, Michael Cacoyannis, and others.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-212
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Arnold
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes) plus 1 screening

THEAT-234ST Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Stage to Screen'

Spring. Credits: 4

A study of ten to twelve plays and their film adaptations. Plays are drawn from a range of periods and genres, and films are chosen to show the scope of adaptive approaches from filmed play to radical re-imaging. The course will include readings on the theory and history of theatre-to-film adaptations. Playwrights will likely include Christopher Marlowe, Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, and David Henry Hwang.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-217SC, FLMST-220SC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Prereq: 4 credits in English or Film Studies or Theatre Arts.

THEAT-243 Drafting for Theatre

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the essentials of drafting scenic and lighting plans for theatrical productions. Students will be taught the drafting conventions that are specific to the theatre industry. Projects will include the drafting of ground plans, centerline sections, front elevations, and light plots. Students are expected to already have a basic knowledge of theatre vocabulary and an understanding of the design process and technical needs of creating and building a set or lighting design for a theatre production. Drafting projects will incorporate both pencil drawing and CAD software techniques.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Dubin
Prereq: THEAT-122, THEAT-126, or THEAT-180.
Notes: design supplies fee of $25.00

THEAT-251 Histories of Performance I

Fall. Credits: 4

A survey of world performance history, including: the evolution of human language and consciousness; the rise of oral, ritual, and shamanic performance; religious and civic festivals; and imperial theatre practices that position the stage at the dangerous intersection of religious worship, public taste, royal patronage, and government censure. Understanding performance as both artistic practice and social institution, this course emphasizes the role performance has played in changing audiences and as a cultural and political force in various societies. We explore not only how performances were created--in terms of design, dramaturgy, architecture, and acting--but also for whom, and why.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Holder

THEAT-252 Histories of Performance II

Spring. Credits: 4

A historical survey of dramatic texts and world performance traditions from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, with attention given to: the influence of print culture on early modern theatrical movements; the rise of nationalism and the creation of dramatic genres; and the effects of industry and technology on experimental modernist forms. Understanding performance as both artistic practice and social institution, this course emphasizes the role performance has played in changing audiences and as a cultural and political force. As such, we explore not only how performances are created--in terms of design, dramaturgy, architecture, and acting--but for whom, and why.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Holder

THEAT-256 Costume History through the Nineteenth Century

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course surveys the history of Western dress from Ancient Egypt and Rome through the nineteenth century. By investigating the evolution of fashion, students will gain an understanding of clothing's relationship to the arts, architecture, and its function in society. Classes consist of lectures, discussions, and examination of primary resources. Students will be evaluated based on a series of presentations and research projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Ford

THEAT-262 Theatre Practicum

Instructor permission required.

THEAT-262CS Theatre Practicum: 'Costumes'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

The practicum covers crew for hair and makeup or wardrobe on a production. The student fulfilling a run crew must be present for all technical rehearsals and performances plus a training session scheduled before the start of tech. No previous experience is necessary for any of these positions; training will be provided as part of the practicum.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Bergeron
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Contact Elaine Bergeron (Costume Shop Manager) for specific dates and times.

THEAT-262LS Theatre Practicum: 'Lighting and Sound'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

This course is for students interested in the production crew positions listed below. No previous experience is necessary for any of these positions; training will be provided as part of the practicum. The student will need to be present for all technical rehearsals and performances and a training session scheduled before the start of tech. Light Board Operator: Program and run the light control board under the guidance of the Lighting Designer and Stage Manager. Sound Board Operator: Program and run the sound board and sound computer under the guidance of the Sound Designer and Stage Manager. Follow Spot Operator: Operate a follow spot under the guidance of the Lighting Designer and Stage Manager. Must be comfortable with heights. Projection Operator: Program and run the projection equipment and computer under the guidance of the Projection Designer and Stage Manager.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Dubin
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Contact Lara Dubin (Lighting Sound Supervisor) for the specific dates and times.

THEAT-262SC Theatre Practicum: 'Scenic Run Crew'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

This course is for students interested in working on Scenic Run Crew. No previous experience is required for this position; training will be provided as part of the practicum. Students will need to be present at all technical rehearsals and performances and will need to help with the strike of the set for the final performances.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Hill
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Contact Shawn Hill (Technical Director) for specific dates and times.

THEAT-272 Dance and Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What are the functions that dance serves in society? How does the dancing body signify cultural values? How is dance a vehicle for the articulation of cultural identities? This course attempts to answer these questions from the perspective of dance anthropology and, on occasion, dance history. We will analyze documentaries and texts that illustrate the diverse manners in which dance ethnographers and historians approach the study of dance as a cultural expression. Balancing breadth and depth, the course focuses on a handful of dance forms from North America, Latin America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe.

Crosslisted as: DANCE-272
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Salyers

THEAT-280 Stage Management

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine stage management techniques for academic, and professional theatre and explore the role of the stage manager in various theatre environments. Each student will be required to stage manage a production. Students will also be required to work within the stage management requirements of the Theatre Department. This course will examine the fundamentals of stage management techniques. Emphasis on the 'Responsible For Everything' role of the stage manager. Students will be required to see and evaluate local theatrical productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Killion
Notes: theatre tickets, supplies, and materials are the responsibility of the student

THEAT-281 Shakespeare

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

A study of some of Shakespeare's plays emphasizing the poetic and dramatic aspects of his art, with attention to the historical context and close, careful reading of the language. Eight or nine plays.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-211
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

THEAT-282 Theatre Practicum

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Fall 2016 Production:
THEAT-282-01: "Intimate Apparel"
Spring 2016 Production:
THEAT-282-01: "Wit"
THEAT-282-02: "Cabaret"
This course is open to any student cast in a mainstage production or serving as a stage manager, assistant stage manager, or assistant director. The student is expected to attend all rehearsals and performances under the supervision of the director. Rehearsals include table reads, blocking and staging, scene work, run-throughs, dress rehearsals, technical rehearsals, invited dress, which culminates in performances for the public. Outside work includes line memorization, character work, and scene preparation. Total contact hours range anywhere from 75-125 over the course of the production

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Tuleja
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: by audition or interview only
Notes: Meets Humanities requirement if taken for 4 credits.

THEAT-283 Playwriting

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers practice in the fundamentals of dramatic structure and technique. Weekly reading assignments will examine the unique nature of writing for the theatre, nuts and bolts of format, tools of the craft, and the playwright's process from formulating a dramatic idea to rewriting. Weekly writing assignments will include scene work, adaptation, and journaling. The course will culminate in the writing of a one-act play. Each class meeting will incorporate reading student work aloud with feedback from the instructor and the class. Students will listen, critique, and develop the vocabulary to discuss plays, structure, story, and content.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-205
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Yukich
Prereq: An English writing course, one course in theatre arts.
Advisory: An English writing course, one course in theatre arts, or permission of instructor
Notes: may be re-taken at 300 level with permission of instructor

THEAT-285 Directing

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to be an introduction to the fundamental theories and principles of directing for the stage. Visual theory, text analysis, collaborative techniques, and organizational strategies are examined and applied in class exercises, including the direction of a major scene. Each student will be required to cast, rehearse, and present to the public a fully realized scene by the end of term. Directing is a complicated activity that requires you to do and be many things, and this course will help you lay the foundation to discovering your own process.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: THEAT-100 or THEAT-105.

THEAT-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

THEAT-299 Career Preparation Seminar

Fall. Credits: 2

This class offers junior and senior majors training and guidance in various forms of graduate- and professional-level presentation, including preparation of/for portfolios, application letters and statements, interviews, auditions, talks, writing samples, and the effective use of digital tools. Designed to facilitate a successful transition to professional work in theatre or to advanced study, the course is structured in part according to the needs of the majors who enroll. Required group meetings will be balanced by individual work with faculty in the student's area of specialization.All students will make formal presentations of work at the end of term.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Pangburn
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.; This course is limited to Theatre Arts majors only.

THEAT-305 Acting III: Styles

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A laugh, a laugh, my kingdom for a laugh!' This performance-intensive course will focus on classic comedic styles, ranging from Shakespeare to Oliver Goldsmith's 'She Stoops To Conquer'. Through a series of classroom explorations, students will learn how to craft a believable character, using the gesture, vocal, and physical language of certain comedic styles including: Commedia, Slapstick, and Restoration. Each student will present at least one soliloquy and one scene, with the final scene presented to the public.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: THEAT-105.

THEAT-315 Topics in Performance

Topics courses offer a specific approach to performing. They may include mask characterization, physical theatre techniques, acting Shakespeare, and vocal training, among others.

Instructor permission required.

THEAT-315AP Topics in Performance: 'Advanced Performance Workshop'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is for actors, directors, dramaturges, choreographers, anthropologists, video and visual artists, and designers. This workshop will develop performance pieces collaboratively. Students will work in teams that explore and investigate a chosen theme, a piece of text, or a type of behavior. Student will present weekly projects over the course of the semester. Use of edited sound, images, and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Instructor permission required.

THEAT-315AS Topics in Performance: 'Advanced Performance Studio'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed for students with a strong grasp of acting, directing, or both. Any student interested in acting will be expected to perform weekly, drawing on styles ranging from Classical Greek to Experimental, including both scene work and audition pieces. Directing students will have the chance to work in a similar variety of styles, starting with a few short scenes and concluding with a major project between 45-60 minutes in length. Those students interested in both areas will have the chance to pursue both areas.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: At least 8 credits above the 200 level in theatre performance and/or directing.

THEAT-320 Topics in Design

Various topics in theatrical design, or in related design fields, including theory, practice, and history. Subjects may include opera performance and design, costume crafts, and materials and techniques, among others.

THEAT-320AD Topics in Design: 'Art Direction for Film and Television'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A study of the art and practice of designing a production on film, the art director as visual conceptualizer, and the techniques of designing sets and locations. Students read film scripts and prepare story boards. They also view films and study them to learn the designer's role in filmmaking.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Prereq: THEAT-122 and 4 credits in Art Studio.
Advisory: A set design course or permission of instructor
Notes: lab fee TBD; students should have access to a still photography camera and supply their own materials

THEAT-320CD Topics in Design: 'Advanced Costume Design'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A semester intensive course exploring the art and work of the costume designer in the performing arts. Students will expand on the process 'from page to stage,' including but not limited to period research, rendering techniques, production documentation, and the process of translating a design in the third dimension. Major stylistic developments in 20th Century costume will be explored. Students will generate a professional level costume design for an entire musical or opera.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Advisory: A College level costume design course

THEAT-334 Topics in Theatre Studies

Various topics in theatre studies including particular theatrical periods and genres. Topics may include melodrama, post-colonial theatre, early 20th century avant-garde movements, feminist theatre, etc. These courses include historical and theoretical approaches and could involve interdisciplinary collaboration.

THEAT-334EA Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Early Modern Drama'

Spring. Credits: 4

All the world's a stage. This course surveys the era of literary history that invented this powerful idea. The drama of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is a drama obsessively self-conscious, bursting with disguises, confidence tricks, cross-dressers, rituals, masques, and plays-within-plays. Reading Shakespeare as well as his rivals and peers (Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and others), we will consider how theater, and the idea of theater, illuminates such concepts as desire, evil, gender, and ideology. Plays will likely include Titus Andronicus, Doctor Faustus, The Alchemist, and The Duchess of Malfi.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-317MD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200 and either ENGL-210 or ENGL-211.

THEAT-350 Seminar

THEAT-350EN Seminar: 'En Garde, a Study of Stage and Screen Violence'

Fall. Credits: 4

All Drama is Conflict. This course investigates how dramatic conflict is represented in theatre, television and film and examines its effect on the audience. Through a series of readings, class discussions, and viewings including, but not limited to, Romeo & Juliet, The Duelists, and Fight Club, students will attempt to answer the question: what is it about human nature that makes us fascinated by violence as a form of entertainment?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts.

THEAT-350HL Seminar: 'Hey, let's start a theatre company!'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will develop and run their own performance company. The class, operating under a specific budget, will choose a season of work to be presented to the public. All decisions, including management, artistic direction, marketing, directing, and casting, will be made by the students taking the course. Each student will also be expected to write one research paper on a performance company of their choosing, in consultation with the professor. This course is designed for the performing arts student who wants to create a company in a safe and supportive environment.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts.

THEAT-350JK Liars, Pranksters, and Jesters on the Italian Stage

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the role of lies and practical jokes in Italian literary culture and the way the concept of humor has changed over time. We will investigate the intimate connection between power, religion, and laughter by reading some of the funniest and politically charged works. Our authors (Machiavelli, Goldoni, Pirandello, De Filippo, Fo) will take us through the streets of Renaissance Florence, eighteenth-century Venetian canals, as well as the improvised "factory theaters" of the 1970s.

Crosslisted as: ITAL-301
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
O. Frau
Notes: Taught in English. Students who wish to obtain Italian credit will have to do all of the readings/writings in Italian and participate in a tutorial with Professor Frau.

THEAT-350MJ Seminar: 'Marlowe, Jonson, Middleton'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A seminar on three major early modern dramatists--Christopher Marlowe, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton--focusing on the range of genres, characters, conflicts, and aspirations explored in their plays. These playwrights, along with their contemporary Shakespeare, shaped the late sixteenth and early seventeenth century theatre into a site for performing authority and conquest, national and individual identity, trickery and carnival, desire and sexuality, and complex unfoldings of revenge. Readings of two or three plays by each of the three dramatists will be supplemented by recent studies of early modern theatricality.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-317MJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: ENGL-199 or ENGL-200 and ENGL-210 or ENGL-211.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

THEAT-350MU Seminar: 'Musical Theatre'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An exploration of musical theatre from both a production and performance standpoint. Classes will focus on acting the song, character development for the musical style, physicalization, the world of the musical, and a historical overview of American Musical Theatre. Four to five musicals will be used as source material.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts.

THEAT-350PC Seminar: 'Performance Criticism Workshop'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar immerses students in the Five College theatre scene, with opportunities for travel to regional professional theatres. By approaching live performance from a critical perspective, students rethink how they see, understand, and respond as audience members. How does the practice of theatre-going relate to public discourse? What is the social function of theatre today? Weekly readings include contemporary theatre criticism and selected plays. Each student writes a number of short reviews over the semester. In-class workshops provide opportunities for discussion and revision. Students learn the arts of editing and offering feedback to others.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: Junior or senior with THEAT-251 and THEAT-252; sophomore with permission of instructor.
Advisory: sr or jr with Theatre Arts 251 and 252; soph with permission of instructor
Notes: This course may be taken more than once. Purchase of theatre tickets is the responsibility of the student.

THEAT-350TD Seminar: 'Design for Theatre, Opera and Dance'

Spring. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to study the histories of design for performance. The arts of designing for theatre, dance and opera will be studied in historical, sociological and political contexts, through illustrated lectures and class discussions. Students will make engaging and informative class presentations that will begin with substantive research and will lead to two written papers fully illustrated in PowerPoint or a similar program. There will be an opportunity to select a practical aspect of the design process and experiment with it.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts.

THEAT-350WD Seminar: 'Women in Design'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will discuss women who have made a seminal contribution to the way we see and experience the visual world through design and material culture including the performing arts, film, fashion and couture, the decorative arts, gardens and interiors. Students will familiarize themselves with the work of Coco Chanel and her female contemporaries, Gertrude Jekyll, Zaha Hadid, Irene Sharaff, Loie Fuller, Sonia Delaunay, Lyubov Popova, Margaret Macdonald, and Eileen Grey as well as many other groundbreaking luminaries. Students will research and analyze a designer's work, and create written and visual presentations. Students will also design a small project.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts, English, Art History, Studio Art, or Dance.

THEAT-350WO Seminar: 'Women in American Theatre and Drama'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers a history of women in performance, from the colonial era to the present day. Americans inherited a European theatrical economy that was largely male dominated, though actresses played a central role on stage and in the public imagination. Today, while serious inequities remain, women are gaining access to the most privileged and powerful positions in a swiftly changing field. We are therefore equally interested in how women have participated in theatrical culture--as actors, producers, playwrights, directors, designers, managers, and audience members--and how they have been represented on commercial, experimental, and regional stages, and across genres and communities.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333BB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Prereq: GNDST-101, or THEAT-100 or THEAT-251 or THEAT-252.

THEAT-350WS Seminar: 'Women in Shakespeare'

Fall. Credits: 4

This is a performance seminar focusing on the female characters in Shakespeare and using Tina Packer's (Founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company) Women of Will: Following the Feminine in Shakespeare's Plays as the jumping-off point for exploration of Shakespeare's plays. In her book, Packer traces the evolution of Shakespeare's female characters, while examining his own growth as a writer from youthful misogynist, to lover, to unabashed feminist. This course will explore that journey, both through analysis and performance, and each student will be required to perform three to four scenes and monologues illuminating that idea.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: 8 credits in Theatre Arts.

THEAT-350WT Seminar: 'Witches in the Modern Imagination'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From the middle ages to the present day, witches have evoked both fear and fascination. Their fellowships (real or fantastic) challenged the prevailing power structures of church and state patriarchies and upset the ordered precepts of the modern world. This seminar offers an overview of the history of witchcraft in Atlantic cultures, with special attention to the early modern British and American colonial eras. We will examine figures of the witch in European art; religious and legal texts that document the persecution of sorcerers; and dramatic, literary, and cinematic representations of witches that have helped to shape our understanding of gender, nature, theatricality, and power.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333WT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Rundle
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: GNDST-101.
Advisory: Required online application, preference to Gender Studies and Theatre Arts majors.

THEAT-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.