Film Studies (FLMST)

FLMST-201 Introduction to Film

Fall. Credits: 4

This course teaches the basic concepts, vocabulary, and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through readings and lectures, students will become more informed and sophisticated observers of the cinema, key examples of which will be screened weekly. While the focus will be on the form and style of narrative film, documentary and avant-garde practices will be introduced. The class will also touch upon some of the major theoretical approaches in the field.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Rodgers
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 1/2 hours)

FLMST-202 Talking Pictures: An Introduction to Film

Spring. Credits: 4

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Broken Blossoms, Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-202
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti

FLMST-203 Introduction to Spanish and Latin American Cinema

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers a broad introduction to the history, politics and aesthetics of Latin American and Spanish cinema. The course also introduces students to the basic terminology and methodologies of film studies.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-240CN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish

FLMST-210 Production Seminar in the Moving Image

Instructor permission required.

FLMST-210VP Production Seminar in the Moving Image: 'Beginning Video Production: Eye to Ear'

Fall. Credits: 4

What is the relationship between image and sound in video? How does listening affect what we see and imagine? As an introduction to video art production, the course will provide a foundation in technical and conceptual skills for making short videos. We will explore the aesthetics and mechanics of shooting digital video, recording and mixing sound, and non-linear editing. Sonic expression will play a leading role in our exploration of video production and interpretation in narrative, documentary and experimental works. Coursework will include individual and group production projects, weekly screenings, readings, and several short writing assignments. Students will complete 3 short videos and a final project.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Miller
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: FLMST-201.
Advisory: Application and permission of instructor required. Application found here: https://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/film/course-application
Notes: A lab fee may be charged

FLMST-212 History of World Cinema Through 1960

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers an historical survey of the cinema as a developing art form and a means of communication. We will examine the history of this international medium from its 19th-century beginnings through the mid-20th century. The national and thematic focus of the course shifts through the semester. For example, we will focus on U.S. film in studying the earliest developments in film technology and narrative, and on Soviet and French films to study the formal and social experimentation of the 1920s. The course provides a background for understanding film history and pursuing further studies in the field.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201, FLMST-202, FLMST-203 or ARTH-202.

FLMST-213 Global Film and Media After 1960

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines films and topics central to the study of global cinema since 1960. Special emphasis will be placed on the transnational organization of global film culture throughout this period. In addition to viewing films made in diverse national contexts (Thailand, France, Iran, the U.K., Japan), we will also analyze films and cultural formations that complicate cinema's relation to national boundaries, including works of exilic and diasporic cinema, international co-productions, and global film festivals.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Guilford
Prereq: FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FLMST-215 Film Theory

This course offers a consideration of one or more of the methods through which the medium of film is understood aesthetically and/or culturally.

FLMST-215CC Film Theory: 'Cinema and the City'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers an historical survey of film theory, from the work of its earliest authors and practitioners at the birth of the 20th century (who first struggled to define the medium), to those who are working still to elucidate the place of the cinema in relation to new media in its ever-evolving and ever more complex place in culture. As a way of focusing the discussion of the various theoretical positions, we will watch and discuss films that represent that most modern of phenomena--the city.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FLMST-215PT Film Theory: 'Philosophy and Film Theory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An exploration of philosophical issues encountered in the study of film. Why do we need a theory of film? What is a film anyway? Do films have "authors"? How do films engage our emotions? Can films be socially critical? What can we learn from films? These are examples of the topics to be discussed in this course as we investigate the nature of film and its relation to philosophy. There will be weekly required film screenings.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-275
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Prereq: 4 credits in Philosophy or Film Studies.
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (1.5 hours)

FLMST-220 Special Topics in Film Studies

FLMST-220AG Special Topics in Film Studies: 'American Gothic'

Fall. Credits: 4

An examination of the gothic--a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity--in American literature and culture, with an emphasis upon issues of race and gender. Topics include slavery and the gothic; gothic sexuality; Southern, Northern, and national gothic; freakishness and grotesquerie; and visual gothic. Focus on fiction, with some film and photography. Authors, filmmakers, and artists may include Alcott, Arbus, Browning, Crane, Dunbar, Dunn, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Kubrick, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Oates, Parks, Poe, Romero, Turner, and Wood.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-243
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: English 240 or 241 recommended
Notes: Component course for Film Studies

FLMST-220DF Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Design for Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The class will study the development of Art Direction and Costume Design for Film and Television from their beginnings in the Twentieth Century to the present. Students will engage in an investigation of the field through written work, visual presentations and practical projects.

Crosslisted as: THEAT-220DF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James

FLMST-220MU Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Music and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is for all who stay to the end of the credits, purchase soundtracks, and argue over who should have won the Oscar for Best Score, along with anyone else interested in the undervalued importance of music to the general effect of a motion picture. We will explore and discuss the myriad ways in which these two media interact. The course will focus on classic scores by Herrmann, Morricone, and Williams, as well as the uses of pre-existing music in films of Kubrick and Tarantino.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-220
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Sanford
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: MUSIC-100, MUSIC-102, MUSIC-103, or MUSIC-131.

FLMST-220PS Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Adaptation from Page to Screen'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The Oxford English Dictionary lists as its primary definition for 'adaptation': 'the bringing of two things together so as to effect a change in the nature of the objects.' Our course considers the complex relationship between a source and its retellings, including the way in which such retellings permanently alter the source material and how each incarnation of a given narrative offers us a window of insight into a particular historical moment. Readings/films will include Macbeth, Frankenstein, The Silence of the Lambs, and No Country for Old Men.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-284
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Prereq: ENGL-199/ENGL-200 or FLMST-201.

FLMST-220RA Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Reel America: History and Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the social and cultural history of the American film industry since the 1890s. The course surveys the evolution of Hollywood cinema from the silent era through the so-called classical period and through the post-World War II breakup of the studio system.

Crosslisted as: HIST-283RA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom
Notes: Component course for Film Studies

FLMST-220RH Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Representing the Holocaust in Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

To mark the seventieth anniversary of the end of World War II, this seminar explores the impact of films depicting the European Holocaust from the first encounter between the liberators and the survivors up to the present day. We analyze the global contexts in which the films came into being and the changing reception of the films with the advent of digital distribution. With a focus on less well-known films from newly distributed archival footage and more recent documentaries made by second- and third-generation children of survivors and perpetrators, we examine issues such as the precarious relationship between memory and history and the ethics of filming the dead and individuals in pain.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231RH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive, Speaking-Intensive
K. Remmler
Notes: Taught in English. Students may consult with the instructor about taking this course for 300-level credit. Students wishing to receive credit in German Studies also must sign up for GRMST-295-02 Independent Study for 2 credits with Karen Remmler. This 2-credit addition will serve as the German discussion section for this course, time to be arranged. Contact Professor Remmler for permission.

FLMST-220SC Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Stage to Screen'

Spring. Credits: 4

A study of ten to twelve plays and their film adaptations. Plays are drawn from a range of periods and genres, and films are chosen to show the scope of adaptive approaches from filmed play to radical re-imagining. The course will include readings on the theory and history of theatre-to-film adaptations. Playwrights will likely include Christopher Marlowe, Oscar Wilde, Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Lorraine Hansberry, Edward Albee, Harold Pinter, David Mamet, and David Henry Hwang.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-217SC, THEAT-234ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Sutherland
Prereq: 4 credits in English or Film Studies or Theatre Arts.

FLMST-220SW Special Topics in Film Studies: 'Screenwriting: The Shape of Stories'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The screenplay is a unique and ephemeral form that exists as a blueprint for something else: a finished film. How do you convey on the page a story that will take shape within an audio-visual medium? The screenwriter must have an understanding of both the language of narrative film as well as the general shape and mechanics of film stories. This course will analyze both the language of film and the shape of film stories by looking at two modes of writing that are often at odds with each other: the three-act screenwriting as exemplified by Hollywood and the more elastic possibilities of the so-called 'art film.'

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Preference will be given to Five College Film Majors. Please complete this questionnaire.

FLMST-260 Film Genres

This course offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific film genre. Some examples of genres that might be studied are: the science fiction, horror, melodrama, musical, Western, detective, or gangster film.

FLMST-260GE Film Genre: 'Film Genre and Gender'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the development of Hollywood film genres largely in the post-studio era, particularly the Western, the Melodrama, the Science Fiction and Horror film, and film noir. We will consider the evolution of these four genres in relation to changes in the film industry and in American society, especially in relation to gender.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204FG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 screening (2 hours, 30 minutes)

FLMST-260MU Film Genre: 'The Musical Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the American Musical Film from its first appearance in the late 1920s in early experiments with sound, through the films of Busby Berkeley and the MCM Musicals to its more recent revival in films such as Baz Luhrmann's 'Moulin Rouge.' The course also examines musical films from other national cinemas that either comment self-reflexively on the genre and its American context and/or expand common definitions of the genre.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201 or FLMST-202 or by permission of instructor.
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes) and 1 screening (2 hours, 30 minutes)

FLMST-270 National and Transnational Cinema

FLMST-270BC National/Transnational Cinema: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

New Description to Come

Crosslisted as: ARTH-290BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha

FLMST-270FM National/Transnational Cinema: 'American Films That Matter'

Fall. Credits: 4

Certain American films stand out as works of art by combining strong narrative structure with striking visual presence. Ten of those films, from the silent era to the present, will be studied. In addition to weekly discussion, students will be responsible for analyzing opening sequences. Among the films to be considered are: The Grapes of Wrath, It's a Wonderful Life, Sunset Boulevard, Touch of Evil, Vertigo, Chinatown, Blade Runner, Do the Right Thing, and Beasts of the Southern Wild.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-290FM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: A previous Film Studies course.

FLMST-270WN National and Transnational Cinema: 'From Weimar to Nazi Germany: Film and Society'

Spring. Credits: 4

Discussing both canonical and lesser-known films from the Weimar and Nazi period, we explore various artistic tendencies, movements and genres in order to define cinema's complex role in representing social and historical experience. We pay special attention to the modes of constructing cinematic spaces, and the social utopias and catastrophes which cinema came to represent.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231WN, ARCH-280WN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Gortcheva
Notes: This course includes a mandatory weekly film screening. Taught in English.

FLMST-275 Documentary Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the history, theory, and practice of the genre called Documentary Film. Between studying the "actualités" of the cinema's first practitioners and the self-reflexive postmodern works of contemporary filmmakers such as Errol Morris, we will investigate ethnographic film, cinema verité, direct cinema, activist media, personal essay films, docudramas, and "mockumentaries." We will examine the formal structures through which these films make meaning and explore theoretical questions concerning notions of truth, ethics, and politics.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.

FLMST-280 Film Authorship

This course offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific cinematic author. While most courses focus on a director or group of directors, courses may also focus on designers, technicians, performers, producers, or some combination

FLMST-285 Experimental Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines some aspect of the history and aesthetics of cinema made outside of the narrative practice of the classical Hollywood model. Some areas of focus include: surrealism and the cinema, American avant-garde cinema, or women's experimental cinema.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.
Notes: 2 meetings (75 minutes), 1 screening (2 hours)

FLMST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

FLMST-310 Special Topics in Media Production:

An advanced course in the theory and practice of film/video production as an art form. Topics for the seminar will vary from year to year.

Instructor permission required.

FLMST-310CP Special Topics in Media Production: 'Advanced Projects in Video Production'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this class, students will take the skills and insights gained in introductory production courses and, working individually or in pairs, develop them over the length of the semester through the creation of one short project, 10 minutes long. We will begin the semester with brainstorming, research, writing, and pre-production. As we move into production, we will review and deepen our knowledge of camera, lighting (available & set), sound (location & studio), and editing principles and techniques. We will move into post-production in the second half of the semester.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Mellis
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: FLMST-210 or its equivalent.
Advisory: Application and permission of instructor required. Application available through Film Studies Web site.
Notes: A lab fee may be charged.

FLMST-310PB Production Seminar: 'The Prison Birth Project'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will study critical digital media production, using the Prison Birth Project's work at the intersection of the reproductive justice movement and the battle for incarcerated people's rights as the applied focus of course work. Assigned readings will focus on documentary ethics and questions of representation, reproductive justice and the carceral state, grassroots fundraising, alternative organizational structures, and the relationship between art and activism. Skills-based class sessions will introduce several modes of media production, including digital storytelling, video production and post-production, smartphone digital photography, and graphic design. This community-based learning course will culminate in a group project, collaborating to generate media content the Prison Birth Project may use for public education and advocacy.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
B. Mellis
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Application required. Should have FLMST-210 and either FLMST-201 or one course at the 100 level in Politics or Gender Studies.

FLMST-315 Topics in Film Theory

This course offers a consideration of one or more of the methods through which the medium of film is understood aesthetically and/or culturally.

Instructor permission required.

FLMST-320 Seminar in Film Studies

FLMST-320BG Seminar in Film Studies: 'Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu Masters: Asian American Film and Visual Culture'

Spring. Credits: 4

(Component Course in Film Studies)This course examines contemporary Asian American film and visual culture through the lens of cultural recovery, self-invention, and experimentation. Focusing primarily on film and photography, we will explore issues of race and visuality, Hollywood orientalism, memory and postmemory, and racial impersonation and parody. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. Artists may include Nikki S. Lee, Margaret Cho, Tseng Kwong Chi, Jin-me Yoon, Justin Lin, Binh Dahn, Richard Fung, Mira Nair, Deepa Mehta, and Alice Wu.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-334VG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

FLMST-320FV Seminar in Film Studies: 'Film Criticism/Videographic Criticism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will examine the rich history of critical writing around cinema and other moving image media, a practice in which some have addressed it as the modernist art of the 20th century, others as a threat to both art and civilized society, and still others as a powerful political tool. The course consists of reading/discussion, writing film criticism, and creating videographic essays.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: 8 credits in Film Studies including FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.
Advisory: No knowledge of editing software is necessary.

FLMST-320MH Seminar in Film Studies: 'Film Melodrama and Horror'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An examination of classic and contemporary works in two important film genres, melodrama and horror. Topics of particular interest: affinities as well as contrasts between genres; feminist analyses and uses of genre; normative and alternative representations of sexualities; genre and the representations of race; spectatorship and the production of affect - tears and screams - by these genres. Extensive readings in film studies and cultural theory. Directors may include Almodóvar, Cronenberg, Curtiz, DePalma, Hitchcock, Kent, Lee, Onwurah, Polanski, Ray, Romero, Sirk, Vidor, and Whale.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-381
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film Studies and 4 credits in English or permission of instructor.
Notes: enrollment may be limited

FLMST-320MW Seminar in Film Studies: 'Visual Anthropology in the Material World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Component course for Film Studies. In this course we go behind the scenes and behind the screens of anthropological films, museum exhibitions, 'small media' events such as television, and publications such as National Geographic Magazine, to explore the social contexts of image production, distribution, and interpretation. Focusing on visual activism and ethics, we consider how popular portrayals of our own society and of others' both shape and are shaped by hierarchies of value in the material world. Finally, we leave the walls of the classroom to produce home movies of places which others call home - workplaces, temporary shelters, artistic environments, and so forth.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-310
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
D. Battaglia
Prereq: ANTHR-105 and 4 additional credits in Anthropology.
Notes: Component course for Film Studies

FLMST-320PF Seminar in Film Studies: 'Philosophy of Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Many critics considered Kathyrn Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty to be the best film of 2012, but it was also widely criticized for seeming to promote torture. Movies can be morally dangerous, seemingly endorsing or even promoting immoral or discriminatory ideals, or romanticizing immoral characters and behavior, as in Hannibal Lecter from Silence of the Lambs (Thomas Harris, 1991). In this course, we evaluate the arguments given for treating certain movies as immoral, and we examine whether and how our moral evaluations of movies should affect us. When, if ever, are movies immoral? Should certain movies be censored? Should we withhold praise from morally objectionable movies?

Crosslisted as: PHIL-375PF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Harold
Prereq: 8 credits in Philosophy or Film Studies or permission of instructor.
Notes: There will be film screenings in addition to the regular class meeting times

FLMST-360 Film Genre

This course offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific film genre. Some examples of genres that might be studied are: the science fiction, horror, melodrama, musical, Western, detective, or gangster film.

FLMST-370 Topics in National/Transnational Cinemas

Film Studies 370 offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to the cinema of a single country or group of countries. Some examples of national cinemas that might be studied are: French cinema, Francophone cinema, Indian cinema, Eastern European cinema, or Latin American cinema.

Instructor permission required.

FLMST-370BC Topics in National/Transnational Cinemas: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How are we to respond to Indian popular film, which is notorious for its distracting song and dance numbers, meandering story line, and visually overblown spectacles? This seminar will develop historical and theoretical approaches to Indian films as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a 'constellation of interruptions.' Students will examine feature films in class, write critical papers on scholarly essays, and pursue independent research projects on various aspects of Indian film.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-360BC, ASIAN-360BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Sinha
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from Art History or Film Studies.
Notes: 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (3 hours)

FLMST-370EF National/Transnational Cinema: 'European Film in Global Context'

Fall. Credits: 4

This class addresses films which deal with European identity and experience in a global perspective. The concepts of "inside" and "outside" guide the discussion in a broad national, racial, ethnic, gender and generational context. The class tackles various genres and exhibition platforms, deepens the students' command of film analysis, and revisits key aspects of film style and form.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Coreq: FLMST-370EFL.
Notes: Evening screenings are mandatory. Taught in English.

FLMST-370MW Topics in National/Transnational Cinemas: 'Memory (of) War'

Spring. Credits: 4

The medium of cinema has shown persistent concern with war and memory, and has constituted a heated battleground for rememberance and erasure of the past. Through cinema, in other words, we most clearly see both memories of war and subsequent wars among competing memories. The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the repressive military regime of Francisco Franco (1939-1975), and recent attempts to "recuperate" memory all dramatize these dynamics and raise a number of larger questions. How do destruction and devastation register through the visual? What happens when we attempt to police memory ( through censorship, propaganda, etc.)? What and why do people choose to remember or forget?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340MW; CST-349MW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish. Component course for Film Studies.

FLMST-370RR Topics in National/Transnational Cinemas: 'Race and Representation in Latina/o Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar offers an interrogation of the ways in which Latinas and Latinos are represented in the cinema. We will explore early portrayals of Latinas and Latinos in film history and then explore contemporary cinema with a focus on race, class, gender and sexuality in these representations. Employing multiple aesthetic and disciplinary approaches we will analyze commercial films alongside independent films with particular attention to the market-driven and political mandates of these projects. We will focus on films by both Latina/o filmmakers and non-Latina/o filmmakers interrogating the multifarious points of entry of these artists.

Crosslisted as: LATST-335
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Prereq: 8 credits from Film Studies.

FLMST-370VN Topics in National/Transnational Cinemas: 'Visualizing Immigrant Narratives: Migration in Film'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers an interrogation of overt and embedded narratives of migrants and the migration process in popular and documentary film, paying specific attention to cinematic representations of non-citizen bodies confronting migration, deportation, labor, acculturation, and anti-immigrant hysteria. Film screenings and class discussions comprise the interpretative lens through which students will examine the aesthetic, cultural, economic, gendered, historical, political, racial, and sexual dimensions of cultural texts. The course is supplemented with readings about immigration policies and histories.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350VM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Hernández
Notes: Component Course in Film Studies.

FLMST-380 Topics in Film Authorship

Film Studies 380 offers a critical, historical, and theoretical approach to a specific cinematic author. While most courses focus on a director or group of directors, courses may also focus on designers, technicians, performers, producers, or some combination of these personnel.

FLMST-380HA Topics in Film Authorship: 'Hitchcock and After'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Mamie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-374
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film Studies and 4 credits in English.
Notes: meets English Department seminar requirement; film screenings Mondays, 7:00-10:00 pm

FLMST-380HJ Topics in Film Authorship: 'Henry James on Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will examine the various screen adaptations of assorted novels by Henry James. We will read the novels against the films, exploring how James's texts translate--or do not translate--into film.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-345HG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
D. Weber
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)

FLMST-380PA Topics in Film Authorship: 'Natural's Not in It: Pedro Almodóvar'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates. For instance, what can a weeping transvestite teach us about desire? What happens when plastic surgery and organ transplants become metaphors? Under what circumstances, if any, can spectators find child prostitution cute?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340PA, GNDST-333PA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.
Notes: Weekly evening screenings; taught in English.

FLMST-380SF Topics in Film Authorship: 'Shakespeare and Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

We will read plays by Shakespeare, watch films based on those plays, and study the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. "Shakespeare" comes first, of course, both historically and as the source/inspiration for the films. Yet each film has its own existence, to be understood not just as an "adaptation," but also as the product of linked artistic, technical, and economic choices. Considering Shakespeare's plays as pre-texts (rather than pre-scriptions), we will look at early and recent films, both those that follow closely conventionalized conceptualizations of "Shakespeare," and those that tend to erase or emend their Shakespearean sources.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-312SF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level, including ENGL-211.

FLMST-385 Topics in Experimental Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This topics course provides advanced instruction in an aspect of film history, theory, or criticism. Students are expected to bring substantial background in the study of film to this course; enrollment may be limited.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.
Notes: 1 meeting (3 hours), 1 screening (2 hours)

FLMST-385AV Topics in Experimental Film: 'American Avant-Garde Cinema'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the history of American avant-garde film, paying special attention to the alternative cultural institutions that have facilitated experimental cinema's emergence and longevity in the U.S. since the 1940s. We will consider how the avant-garde's interest in creating an alternative cinema necessitated a dramatic reorganization of existing modes of filmic production, distribution, exhibition, reception, and preservation. Students will analyze the major artistic tendencies that have defined the postwar American avant-garde, as well as the broader institutional practices involved in the production and maintenance of experimental film culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Guilford
Prereq: 8 credits in department including FLMST-201 or FLMST-202.

FLMST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: a lab fee may be charged