Critical Social Thought (CST)

CST-118 Introduction to Political Ideas

CST-200 Foundations in Critical Social Thought

Spring. Credits: 4

This class introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Critical Social Thought. Students will learn to interrogate and challenge structures of social, cultural, and political power from a variety of theoretical traditions, such as Marxism, critical ethnic studies, queer and gender critique, critical race theory, media studies, performance studies, disability studies, history of science, the Frankfurt school, and settler colonial and postcolonial theory. Developing skills in theoretical and social critique to address pressing social issues, students will be equipped with an interdisciplinary toolbox to pursue independent projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day

CST-223 United Colors of Neoliberal America

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What can Brown do for you? This question captures a central theme of this course: how a word like "Brown" evolved from a 1970s signifier of antiracist coalition building into a motto of the United Parcel Service (UPS), selling speed, efficiency, and access to networks of the global economy. Using interdisciplinary methods, we will explore the way multicultural imagery, Civil Rights discourse, and state policy have converged in the service of global capitalism. Focusing on fiction (egs. Octavia Butler, Karen Yamashita), film (egs. Crash, Sleep Dealers) and secondary sources, we will examine the impact of neoliberal multiculturalism and how cultural producers amplify and challenge its logics.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-223
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day

CST-248 Science, Revolution, and Modernity

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces critical analysis of science and technology by tracing the historiography of the Scientific Revolution. The significance of this extended intellectual episode has been assessed in radically different ways throughout the intervening centuries. As such, it provides a fertile ground on which to pose and answer important questions about science and its role in society. What does it mean to regard science as 'revolutionary'? How are scientific developments shaped by, and how do they shape, the social, economic, and political worlds in which they are embedded? How is our contemporary understanding of science and technology influenced by the stories we tell about the past?

Crosslisted as: HIST-248
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Cotter
Restrictions: This course is limited to the sophomore and junior classes.
Notes: Gateway course for minor in Conceptual Foundations of Science

CST-249 Topics in Critical Social Thought

CST-249AE Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Afro-Asian Encounters: Literatures, Cultures, Activisms'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores historical and contemporary connections between African American and Asian American communities -- the moments of solidarity as well as tension that have made their mark on literary and expressive culture. Looking to literary narratives, historical documents, film, and performance, we will consider how these groups have been defined in relation to one another, and explore how the categories of "Black" and "Asian" have come to be defined in the US context. In addition to our exploration of cultural objects, we will also study comparative ethnic frameworks -- like women of color feminisms and queer of color critique -- that read across and through the partitioning of ethnic American groups. This course ultimately aims to get students to think critically about the making of racial meaning, and to consider the centrality of literature and culture to social justice movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Kim

CST-249CC Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Cults, Conspiracies, and Moral Panics'

Spring. Credits: 4

Using case studies such as the Eugenics Movement, Jonestown, and the Kennedy Assassination, this course will examine how distrust of the government, originally motivated by logical concerns, has transformed the way people think about power in the postmodern era. The class will explore the difference between rational questioning of authority and blind distrust that leads to questionable claims. Through topics such as the War on Drugs, this class shows how the powerful are able to use biases and public fears to carry out their own, often counterproductive, measures. These case studies have issues like race and class at their core. We will examine how certain social issues have managed to endure.

Crosslisted as: SOCI-216CC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
N. Michaud Wild
Prereq: SOCI-123.

CST-249CE Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Christian Ethics: Premodern, Postmodern'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers an introduction to a broad range of premodern Christian (1st-15th century) writings concerning ethics. These readings will be read in tandem with a spectrum of postmodern thinkers, but particularly those belonging to a postcolonial or to a poststructuralist theoretical persuasion. The objective of the course is to question a hegemonic narrative of western ethics, and Enlightenment morality specifically, including idealist and consequentialist ethics.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225CE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Salés

CST-249DD Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Diversity, Inclusiveness, and Daily Democracy in United States History'

Fall. Credits: 4

A recent history calls our era "the age of fracture," a time when Americans are deeply divided from one another. History and American Studies provide ways to understand such division. How have Americans -- and those contending with America -- handled conflict while envisioning and reaching for more inclusive communities, in earlier eras and in our own? We will consider racism, citizenship, wealth, poverty, land ownership, gender, sexuality, dissent, and other axes of exclusion through studies of community, individual experience, and cultural struggle in the arts and public humanities. What can we learn about the possibilities for creating and sustaining democracy through daily life and culture?

Crosslisted as: HIST-280DD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Renda
Notes: The fourth hour is required but will not meet every week.

CST-249EM Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Spring. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

CST-249FD Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Eating Asian America: Thinking through Food in Literature and Culture'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on 20th and 21st century Asian American literature and culture through the critical lens of food: as medium of representation, crucible of memory, site of labor, and material trace of history. Through analyses of pop culture, literature, film, and cultural history, we will examine the intimate association of Asian American subjects with food, eating and cooking, as well as food's relationship to anti-immigrant sentiment, cultural assimilation, multiculturalist celebration, and U.S. empire. This course will further situate food within an intersectional framework, through which we consider the co-articulation of race with gender, sexuality, class, and nation

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Kim

CST-249LR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Latina/o/x Urbanism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the relationship between the urban and Latina/o/x placemaking, identities and culture(s). Urban scholars have long studied the "evolving" city-this course explores the changing city in relation to Latina/o/x populations and urban social change movements. We examine historical and contemporary conditions and cover a broad range of topics including: urbanization, urban planning, "new urbanism," placemaking, gentrification, migration/immigration, segregation, and more. The readings in this course aim to provoke a consideration of the dynamic between space and place, as well as how urban life, culture, and form impacts Latina/o/x populations and vice versa.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250LR, SOCI-216LR
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
V. Rosa

CST-249RP Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Race, Racism, and Power'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250RP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
V. Rosa

CST-249TJ Topics in Critical Social Thought: Culture: 'Transforming Justice and Practicing Truth to Power: Critical Methodologies and Methods in Community Participatory Action Research and Accountability'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center on questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204TJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-249TR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will investigate knowledge/cultural production produced by trans* communities, particularly those multiply impacted by categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, citizenship and location. To understand the critical feminist genealogy/insurgency in which transgender studies/activism have become a field/site of political discourse, we will explore the overlaps and tensions between women/queer/trans* of color activism and theory. Using experimental and multimedia archives of affect, grief, desire, love, liberation and identitarian contradictions, we will ask how counter genealogies as process can transform how we relate to and inhabit power, futurity and memory.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204TR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits from Gender Studies.

CST-249WT Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Sociology of 9/11 and the War on Terror'

Fall. Credits: 4

We will explore the cultural and political impact of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The media's role in constructing meanings will be a main organizing focus of the course. Using readings, discussions, assignments, and films, the course will allow students to form a picture of how 9/11 changed America and beyond. Course topics include: the way the mainstream media constructed 9/11 and alternate ways they could have; how popular culture and the Public Sphere responded; complex historical factors leading up to 9/11; reasons the attackers say they committed the attacks; ways the event changed culture and politics in the world; conspiracy theories.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Michaud Wild
Prereq: SOCI-123.

CST-249YE Special Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'The Undocumented Latina/o Youth Experience: Struggles, Resiliency, and Futures'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the immigrant rights movement, emphasizing diverse undocumented Latina/o students throughout the K-20 pipeline. Readings and discussions will: address the socio-political construction of 'illegality'; critically examine the creation and implementation of pro- and anti-immigrant legislation, particularly policies that impact undocumented students; survey the challenges and resiliency of the undocumented youth movement as it pertains to education, social mobility, and health; and deconstruct the legislative, political, economic, and cultural factors that impact the undocumented community in the U.S.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250YE, EDUST-250YE
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Soltero López

CST-253 Critical Race Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the discursive relationship between race and law in contemporary U.S. society. Readings examine the ways in which racial bodies are constituted in the cultural and political economy of American society. The main objective is to explore the rules and social practices that govern the relationship of race to gender, nationality, sexuality, and class in U.S. courts and other cultural institutions. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Kimberle Crenshaw, Derrick Bell, and Richard Delgado, among others.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-208
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Critical Social Thought 248, 249,or 250 recommended but not required

CST-256 Rethinking (Under)Development in Latin America

Fall. Credits: 4

When and how did the notion of "development" emerge and spread? Why does nearly every country now aspire to it? What stigmas and hierarchies does the term "under-development" imply? Throughout Latin America, such terms prove highly problematic not only with respect to the material reality they purport to describe but also as a framework for understanding place, time, and selfhood. In this course, students rethink conventional wisdom about "underdevelopment" through the study of writers, filmmakers, and painters from Latin America working at different historical junctures of the twentieth century.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-287DE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Gudmundson

CST-258 Existentialism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Does human life have meaning (purpose)? Can religion or spirituality provide it? If not, is human life 'absurd'? How can we attain or create meaning in the face of the 'absurdity' of human life? What is genuine human freedom? Are other people in the world obstacles to, or also sources for, our attempt to attain or create meaning in our lives? What is existential commitment and 'authenticity'? Is existentialist ethics possible at all? We will examine the central themes of existentialism in readings from Kierkegaard, Dostoyevsky, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, de Beauvoir, and Fanon (among others). We will also end the course by considering some significant criticisms of existentialism.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-255
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Koo

CST-280 Literary and Cultural Theory

Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to literary and cultural theory with an emphasis on twentieth century and contemporary thought. We will focus on crucial questions that have focused, and continue to focus, critical debate. These questions may include representation, subjectivity, ideology, identity, difference, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout we will be particularly interested in the ways in which language and form mediate and construct social experience.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-280
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

CST-339 The Visual Culture of Protest

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines social protests from the perspective of the visual. Examining cultural productions from 1948-2015 we will focus on the geographical specificity of planned and spontaneous protests that have mobilized people into action. We will use a black studies framework to engage the possibilities present in resisting disparate power structures of race, gender, sexuality, class, and region. Artists, musicians, activists, writers, and grassroots organizers of social movements have been ever cognizant of the role of the visual in subverting power structures. We will use this opportunity to place visual culture at the center of a conversation concerning resistance, human rights, political agency, citizenship, and freedom.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-339, ENGL-339
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown
Prereq: ENGL-199/200, or AFCNA-200.

CST-342 Science as Culture

Fall. Credits: 4

What is science? The progressive discovery of Nature's laws? The process of honing claims about the universe? Is science the act of postulating and testing hypotheses? Or is it tinkering, experimentation? This course offers an advanced introduction to cultural and anthropological studies of science. Through careful readings of work in areas such as the sociology of scientific knowledge, actor-network theory, feminist science studies, and affect theory, we will explore the sciences as complex systems of cultural production. The course will culminate in a series of critical ethnographic studies of how the sciences shape concepts and experiences of race, the body, gender, and sexuality.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

CST-346 Irish Gothic

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This advanced seminar will study the gothic as a genre and as a malleable yet persistent discursive site in Irish literary and political tradition. From the eighteenth century to the present, the gothic has been used to explore aspects of Irish history, in particular colonialism. The course will focus on texts that engage with three primary problems that the Irish gothic is used to explore: violence and terror, famine, and vampirism as a political metaphor. We will read novels, short fiction, poetry, and archival newspaper writing, including work by Maturin, Edgeworth, Lady Wilde, Mangan, LeFanu, Stoker, Joyce, Bowen, Enright, Deane, Boland, and Heaney.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-346
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: online application required
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

CST-349 Advanced Topics

CST-349AN Advanced Topics: 'Love, Sex, and Death in the Anthropocene, or Living Through the Age of Climate Disaster'

Spring. Credits: 4

The "Anthropocene" has been defined as the era when humans exert change on the earth's climate, but this term has become a dynamo for theories, political discussions, and art about man's anthropocentric relation to the nonhuman world. This course will read theories of the Anthropocene alongside artistic contemplations of the shifting, ethical relations among humans, animals, and other beings of the world. How are we to live, die, and reproduce ourselves in a time when we have egregiously affected the earth? How does the critique of anthropocentrism shift our understanding of sex, gender, race, and the nonhuman? Finally, how does art speak within political conversations of climate change?

Crosslisted as: ENGL-366
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.
Prereq: 8 credits in English or Critical Social Thought.

CST-349AX Advanced Topics: 'Making Waves: Gender and Sexuality in Asian America'

Spring. Credits: 4

Dragon ladies, lotus blossoms, geisha girls--the U.S. cultural imaginary is saturated with myths regarding Asian sexuality and gender. This interdisciplinary course intervenes into this dominant imaginary by exploring feminist and queer frameworks derived from Asian-American contexts: immigration, labor, racial stereotyping, militarization, citizenship, and so-called "terrorism." Through a mix of scholarly, creative, activist, and media texts, we will challenge preconceived notions about Asian Americans as regressive, repressed, or hyper-sexual, as well as examine the powerful counter-imaginaries offered within Asian American literature and culture.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333AX
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Kim
Prereq: GNDST-101.

CST-349BT Advanced Topics: 'The Body Toxic: Narratives of Race, Disability, and Illness'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the intersections of race, disability, illness, and health using literature and culture as primary sites of engagement. Looking to writers like Audre Lorde, Anna Deavere Smith, Mia Mingus, Harriet Jacobs, and Indra Sinha, it asks how structures of racial, environmental, and economic inequity transform the category of disability, which critics have primarily defined in terms of whiteness. It also considers alternate conceptions of health--models that do not align with mandates of productivity or normative embodiment--offered by the texts under consideration, and asks what political/ social liberation might look like when able-bodiedness is no longer privileged.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333BT
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Kim

CST-349FM Advanced Topics: 'Latina Feminism(s)'

Spring. Credits: 4

What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Central to seminar discussions and student learning is a substantial community-based learning requirement that will facilitate a deeper engagement and analysis of the relationship between the concepts we explore in the course. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350FM, GNDST-333FM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
V. Rosa
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

CST-349MC Advanced Topics: 'Latinas/os/x and Housing: Mi Casa Is Not Su Casa'

Fall. Credits: 4

Housing is closely tied to quality of life and the health of neighborhoods and communities. As a main goal of the "American Dream," homeownership has important significance on an individual and societal level. For immigrants, this goal is often out of reach as a result of racism and discriminatory housing policies. This interdisciplinary seminar explores Latinas/os/x relationship to housing and homeownership by examining: 1. the history of housing policy in the United States; 2. national identity, assimilation, and housing; and 3. discriminatory housing policies/programs and housing inequality. We explore topics including immigration, housing policy, public housing, segregation, gentrification, the suburbs, homelessness, eviction, affordability, and community building. Exploring this range of topics will help us develop a clearer understanding of why housing is one of the most pressing issues for Latinas/os/x today.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350MC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
V. Rosa
Restrictions: This course is open to Juniors and Seniors.

CST-349MS Advanced Topics: 'Multi-Species Justice? Entangled Lives and Human Power'

Spring. Credits: 4

How can we change animal exploitation and re-situate the human more equitably with other species? Through animal rights? Justice? Abolition? Dismantle human exceptionalism? Animal emancipation? Companionship? Co-existence? Stewardship? What are the uses and limits of the discourses from which critical animal studies borrows conceptually, for example: antiracism, feminism, disability studies, nationalism, transformative justice, and so on. We will explore different scenarios of human-nonhuman entanglements, such as training, rescue, the animal industrial complex, the politics of extinction, hunting, infection, predation, breeding/reproduction and others.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333MS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann
Prereq: 4 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-349MW Advanced Topics: 'Memory (of) War'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The medium of cinema has shown persistent concern with war and memory, and has constituted a heated battleground for rememberance and erasure of the past. Through cinema, in other words, we most clearly see both memories of war and subsequent wars among competing memories. The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the repressive military regime of Francisco Franco (1939-1975), and recent attempts to "recuperate" memory all dramatize these dynamics and raise a number of larger questions. How do destruction and devastation register through the visual? What happens when we attempt to police memory (through censorship, propaganda, etc.)? What and why do people choose to remember or forget?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340MW, FLMST-370MW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: Two courses in Spanish at the 200-level above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

CST-349NT Advanced Topics: 'Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment And Survival'

Fall. Credits: 4

Sexuality via current US law is largely conceived of as a singular identity axis, existing independently of other categories and social phenomena. Through critical queer, critical race and settler colonial theory, this course will study the concepts of sexual citizenship/respectability in relation to criminality of "deviant" sexualized, racialized, colonized bodies. In turn, we will explore recent modes of LGBT legal reform -- or rather "carceral feminisms" and "pink-washing." Lastly, we will focus on the unprecedented rate in which women/queer/trans people of color experience violence from the criminal justice system and its law enforcers, even in cases of survival and self-defense.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits from Gender Studies.

CST-349PW Advanced Topics: 'Once More With Feeling: Intimacies and Affects in a Posthuman World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Affect theory offers a varied and rich critical language to explore how emotion circulates within and among human bodies-and nonhuman ones as well. If emotions operate through bodily changes and chemical exchanges, then animals and nonhumans might similarly be seen as bodies replete with affective materials in motion and at rest. In this course we will read through an array of affect theory from cognitive science, animal studies, and posthumanist debates on the affect of objects. We will consider how humans know what they feel (and when), how animals love, how forests think, and how affects might cross human and nonhuman boundaries.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-382PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Prior experience with theory is helpful but not necessary.

CST-349RC Advanced Topics: 'The Philosophy of Recognition'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Since the 1960s, many social movements for justice, equality, and inclusion in our world have taken the form of struggles for recognition (e.g., antiracism, feminism, multiculturalism, LGBT activism, etc.). What is recognition in this sense and conversely misrecognition, i.e., the sort of harm or injustice done to someone or certain populations of people by failing or choosing not to recognize them? How can (mis)recognition show up and be theorized both as a matter of how people are socially constituted and how they should treat one another? We will discuss readings (among others) from Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Hannah Arendt, Iris Young, Charles Taylor, Axel Honneth, Nancy Fraser, and Patchen Markell.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-353RC, GNDST-333RC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Koo
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One prior course at the 200 level in philosophy, politics, sociology, critical social thought, or gender studies.

CST-349RE Advanced Topics: 'Body and Gender in Religious Traditions'

Spring. Credits: 4

Do bodies matter in religious traditions? Whose bodies matter? How do they matter? By studying religious body ideals and practices, we examine the possibilities and problems different kinds of bodies have posed in religious traditions. Topics include religious diet, exercise, and dress; monasticism, celibacy, and sexuality; healing rituals, and slavery and violence. We pay special attention to contemporary challenges to problematic body ideals and practices coming from feminist, disability, postcolonial, queer, and trans theorists and activists.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-352, GNDST-333RT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Mrozik
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-349RT Advanced Topics: 'Critical Race Theory in Education'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on Critical Race Theory, its history and application in the field of Education. Through course readings and assignments, students will explore and discuss key issues such as race/racism, class/classism, gender/sexism among other "isms" and how they impact the teaching and learning experiences of students of color. This course is specifically designed to challenge students and make them think critically about their multiple identities, privileges and challenges as students and future leaders. The goal is gain a critical understanding of the connection between theory, research, and practice in order to better understand educational structures, processes, and discourses.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350RT, EDUST-351RT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Soltero López
Notes: Students interested in careers within Education are highly encouraged to enroll.

CST-349ST Advanced Topics: 'Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinities, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will investigate the racialization of masculinity (and the masculinization of race) as undergirded by heteropatriarchy, settler colonialism, militarized borders and imperialism. This course will center perspectives from various "Third World Solidarity" diasporas in order to challenge Western, hegemonic and inherent legacies of masculinity as modernity's (hu)man. Using critical race theory, feminist, queer/trans* of color critique (e.g., Wynter, Fanon, David Eng, José Muñoz), we will ask how whiteness (white supremacist masculinity) shapes and colors masculinity -- whether as exemplar, visible, illegible, failed, deviant and even toxic -- and what then falls outside of such a frame?

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-349VC Advanced Topics: 'Victorian Literature and Visual Culture'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine literary texts that represent new forms of visuality in nineteenth-century Britain as well as examples of visual culture that provide a framework for reading Victorian culture in innovative ways. We will study nineteenth-century photography--portraiture, prison photography, imperial photographs, and private and popular erotic images--as well as novels and autobiographical writing that engage with new photographic technology and its transformation of the ways in which Victorians understood identity, politics, aesthetics, and representation. The course will take a similar approach to painting, literary illustration, political cartoons and caricature, and advertising.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-325
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: ENGL-220 or ENGL-323 and at least 4 credits from art history or film studies.

CST-349WC Advanced Topics: 'Writing Capitalism's Ruins'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

There's a low buzz; we feel nervous. Is this capitalism's end? Have zombie silhouettes hit the horizon yet? Keep checking. Anthropology narrates collective feelings, gives form to the ambience. But what's the ambience of late industrialism; what's it feel like to collapse? As we watch factory buildings crumble, we wonder whether the tap water's clean. The question of how to write the world (anthropologically-speaking) must also be a question of how to survive, thrive, and even flourish. Archaeologists have long explored decadence, collapse, and ruins. Cultural anthropologists now find themselves in the archaeologists' shoes. Drawing from archaeology, cultural anthropology, ecology, and literary theory, this course will be an open-ended, writing-oriented examination of contemporary experiences of ruins and ruination.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316WC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

CST-349WT Advanced Topics: 'Sociology of 9/11 and the War on Terror'

Spring. Credits: 4

We will explore the cultural and political impact of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The media's role in constructing meanings will be a main organizing focus of the course. Using readings, discussions, assignments, and films, the course will allow students to form a picture of how 9/11 changed America and beyond. Course topics include: the way the mainstream media constructed 9/11 and alternate ways they could have; how popular culture and the Public Sphere responded; complex historical factors leading up to 9/11; reasons the attackers say they committed the attacks; ways the event changed culture and politics in the world; conspiracy theories.

Crosslisted as: SOCI-316WT
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
N. Michaud Wild
Prereq: 8 credits in Sociology

CST-391 Pivotal Political Ideas

CST-391CT Pivotal Political Ideas: 'Capitalism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

After reviewing the classic defense of capitalism as an engine of freedom, progress, and productivity, we will examine major shifts in the critique of capitalism from the early 19th to the early 21st century. This critical conceptual history will range over successive claims that capitalism foments labor exploitation and class inequality, imperialism, instrumentalism, the commodification of culture, the privatization of the commons, and the re-making of subjectivities to suit market imperatives. The course will conclude with Pope Francis's charge that the global capitalist system endangers 'whatever is fragile, like the environment' and devours everything 'in the way of increased profits.' Is Francis right, and if so, what are possible cures for these ills?

Crosslisted as: POLIT-391CT
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
A. Aslam
Prereq: One course in political theory or critical social thought.

CST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.