All Courses

Undergraduate Level

AFCNA-141 Introduction to Modern African History

Fall. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to African history over the past three centuries. Venturing beyond the stereotypes, we will explore the complex histories that constitute a diverse continent. Special attention is given to spotlighting the voices of African people through a range of primary and secondary sources, including memoirs, film, music, cartoons, speeches and photography. Students will gain knowledge of African geographies and histories, develop the skill of primary source analysis, and be able to connect events in -- and narratives of -- present-day Africa to a deeper historical past.

Crosslisted as: HIST-141
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti

AFCNA-181 Introduction to African Diaspora Religions

Spring. Credits: 4

Over the last century, religionists have labored to discover the meaning of African dispersal beyond the continent and its accompanying spiritual lineages. What theories of encounter sufficiently adjudicate the synthetic religious cultures of African-descended persons in North America, South America, and the Caribbean? What are the cross-disciplinary methodologies that scholars utilize to understand African religious cultures in the Western hemisphere? Firstly, this course will introduce the field of Africana religious studies. This background will inform the second and primary objective of the course: thematizing and exploring West and Central African religious traditions housed in the Americas.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-181, CST-149AD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias

AFCNA-200 Foundations of Africana Studies

Spring. Credits: 4

This reading- and writing-intensive course draws upon the intellectual traditions of African American, African, and African diasporic studies in order to explore the connections and disjunctures among people of African descent. While the course pays attention to national, regional, and historical contexts, it asks this question: what do African descended people have in common and when and how are their experiences and interests different? What can we glean from contemporary discourses grounded in the consideration of global black lives?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Bailey

AFCNA-208 Introduction to Twentieth-Century Critical Race Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the discursive relationship between race, power and law in contemporary U.S. society. Readings examine the ways in which racial bodies are constituted in the cultural economy of American society where citizens of African descent dwell. We explore the rules and social practices that govern the relationship of race to gender, nationality, sexuality, and class in U.S. courts and other cultural institutions. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Kimberle Crenshaw, Derrick Bell, and Richard Delgado, among others.

Crosslisted as: CST-253
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Critical Social Thought 248, 249,or 250 recommended but not required

AFCNA-221 Engaging Ghana: Inquiry and Action

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course prepares students to pursue curated internships in Ghana. It provides the historical, social, economic, political and cultural context crucial for powerful student learning experiences and ethical engagement with Ghanaian organizations and communities. Guest lectures, readings, and class discussion will provide an intellectual orientation to the country, as well as contextualize student work in curated internships across a range of fields and sites. The course begins a journey of reflection on personal and internship organizations goals that will continue when instructor and students are on site in Ghana in the summer.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
P. Smith
Instructor permission required.

AFCNA-222 Engaging Ghana: Experience and Reflection

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course facilitates a structured reflection for students to interrogate their intellectual preparation and subsequent experiential learning during high-value internships the previous summer in Ghana. The course concludes, momentarily, a journey of reflection on personal and internship organizations goals that began with a pre-departure course the previous spring continuing on site in Ghana in the summer. It will present a platform where students can explore a new understanding of themselves in the world after their summer experience in Ghana. Ultimately, the course will help students think about their next steps in their academic program of study and future careers. The course will culminate in students sharing what they learned during their summer internships in Ghana with the wider community through public presentations.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
P. Smith
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: AFCNA-221.

AFCNA-234 Black Metropolis: From MLK to Obama

Fall. Credits: 4

Black Metropolis" refers to the more than half a million black people jammed into a South Side ghetto in Chicago at mid-twentieth century that featured an entrenched black political machine, a prosperous black middle class, and a thriving black cultural scene in the midst of massive poverty and systemic inequality. This course will follow the political, economic, and cultural developments of what scholars considered to be the typical urban community in postwar United States. We will examine such topics as Martin Luther King's failed desegregation campaign; Harold Washington, first black mayor; William Julius Wilson's urban underclass thesis; and the rise of Barack Obama.

Crosslisted as: POLIT-234
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
P. Smith

AFCNA-241 Topics in Africana Studies

AFCNA-241AF Topics in Africana Studies: 'Afro-Latin America: From Slavery to Invisibility'

Spring. Credits: 4

Exploration of the history of Afro-Latin American populations since Independence within and outside the nation-state. We will question why and how to study those whose governments define them not as peoples of African descent but as part of a mixed-race majority of Hispanic cultural heritage, who themselves may often have supported this policy, and who may have had compelling reasons to avoid official scrutiny. Readings include early twentieth-century Latin American racialist theorizing; research using census, economic, criminal, and marriage records; autobiographical works, and analysis of race in textual and musical representations of peoples, regions, and nations.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-260, HIST-287AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

AFCNA-241BN Topics in Africana Studies: 'Black Abolitionists: American Revolution to Reconstruction'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Slavery existed throughout the U.S. at the time of the American Revolution; afterwards, gradual emancipation plans freed the children of the formerly enslaved in the northern states. Runaways from the South increased their numbers. These nineteenth-century African Americans built the first edifices of freedom, chiefly through the institutions of family and religion, and furnished both leaders and foot soldiers for the abolitionist movement. They acted in the hope that their efforts would end slavery and bring full citizenship for black people. We will examine their unique contributions to the history of freedom, and the many obstacles they faced as they mobilized for emancipation.

Crosslisted as: HIST-274
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
L. Morgan

AFCNA-241CB Topics in Africana Studies: 'Caribbean Literature in the Age of Globalization'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers a study of selected Caribbean drama, prose, and poetry. We will read works published since 1970 that explore central themes such as the enduring impact of slavery and colonization, resistance movements, global migration and diasporic experiences, the constructions of gender, and the importance of history and memory. This course also engages deeply with form, particularly the role of orature, performance, and global popular cultures. We will read the literary works of writers such as Dionne Brand, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, and Marlon James.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-252
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Bailey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

AFCNA-241FR Topics in Africana Studies: 'Beyond Francafrique: Franco-African Encounters in Historical Perspective'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines how France and Francophone West Africa have shaped each other throughout the past three centuries. Beginning with the French Atlantic of the eighteenth century, the course traces Franco-African encounters through informal and formal colonial rule, decolonization, and the postcolonial period. It closes by examining current controversies over race, literature and museum rights engendered by this complex history. Students will gain a deep historical understanding of contemporary issues, giving them the capacity to think widely about social divisions, power asymmetries, and debates surrounding identity and belonging that de-center the American experience.

Crosslisted as: HIST-241, CST-249FR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti

AFCNA-241HS Topics in Africana Studies: 'African American History, Precolonial to Emancipation'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the cultural, social, political, and economic history of African Americans through the Civil War. Topics covered include the African background to the African American experience, the Atlantic slave trade, introduction and development of slavery, master-slave relationships, the establishment of black communities, slave revolts, the political economy of slavery, women in slavery, the experiences of free blacks, the crisis of the nineteenth century, and the effect of the Civil War.

Crosslisted as: HIST-281
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

AFCNA-241PE Topics in Africana Studies: 'African Performance Aesthetics'

Fall. Credits: 4

This class explores African approaches to performance, premised on the interdisciplinarity of theatre in many African societies. We take our inspiration from centuries of apprentice-style artist training in some indigenous West African societies. The evolution of oral and popular performance traditions into literary theatre has also necessitated a similar trend in the training of the modern actor. The primary object of this class is to be able to embody a plethora of idiomatic expressions. Thus, we will move to the energy of the drums, we will train the ears to transmit the complex musicality of several sonic elements and raise our voices in song and apply them in scene explorations. Ultimately, we intend to unlock new ways of using our minds, bodies, and voices as conduits of exciting storytelling.

Crosslisted as: FMT-240PE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Ofori

AFCNA-241SA Topics in Africana Studies: 'Slavery in the Americas'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A course, organized topically rather than geographically or nationally, that offers a comparative analysis of African American slavery as a dominant social system in Brazil, the Caribbean, and the U.S. South. Topics include: why slavery?; sugar and slavery; historical demography; culture and the law; kinship and family; long-run economic development; patterns of race relations; master class and racist ideologies; resistance to slavery; and abolition and its aftermath. Readings include historical and anthropological studies, as well as a major documentary collection on slavery in Brazil.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-289, HIST-289
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Gudmundson

AFCNA-241WA Topics in Africana Studies: 'West African Women in Their Own Words'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course challenges students to consider how and why, following Ralph-Michel Trouillot, certain voices get "silenced" in the historical record. We study how women have both shaped history and been subject to its forces, though often in unexpected ways. This course is unique because we learn about women in 18th, 19th and 20th century West Africa through their own words. Students will encounter more than a dozen real and fictional African women: mighty queens, snide co-wives, shrewd traders, ingenious slaves, brilliant writers, and fierce activists. Engaging with their stories in multiple formats; students will study graphic novels, fiction, and memoir, in addition to academic works.

Crosslisted as: HIST-296WA, GNDST-206WA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti

AFCNA-241WE Topics in Africana Studies: 'On West Africa's Shores: From the Sahara to the Atlantic c. 800 to 1800'

Spring. Credits: 4

One of the most significant shifts in global history is the incorporation of the New World into the Afro-Eurasian trading system. Slowly, but surely, the Mediterranean declined as a hub of inter-continental trade, and the Atlantic Ocean gained ground. On West Africa's Shores analyzes this world-historical pivot from the perspective of West Africa. Beginning with the rise of the Ghana Empire, we study trans-Saharan cultures of exchange, the societies of West Africa's Middle Ages, and the ways that the trans-Atlantic slave trade transformed the region. A special focus on art and artefacts helps us imagine the worlds of West Africa over the course of a millennium.

Crosslisted as: HIST-242
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti

AFCNA-246 Womanist Religious Thought

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

As a conceptual framework which reconsiders the rituals, scriptures, and allegiances of religious black women, womanist thought has expanded the interdisciplinary canon of black and feminist religious studies. This course is a survey of womanist religious scholars from multiple religious traditions: Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Yoruba-Ifa -- as well as theorists who understand womanism as a "spiritual but not religious" orientation. Course participants will use the interpretive touchstones of cross-culturalism, erotics, earthcare, and health -- among others -- to examine contemporary womanist religious thought.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-246, GNDST-210WR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias

AFCNA-250 African American Literature I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

African American literature, particularly in the early part of the formation of the United States, reflects the dichotomy between citizenship and American identity. This course will study the literary works of African Americans from the late-eighteenth century to 1865. Beginning with slave narratives and early poetry, we will consider issues of genre, literary tradition, and historical context while gaining experience in analyzing literary texts. Themes of alienation, communion, haunting, and upward mobility will be covered to illuminate the expansive world of early African American literature. Authors include: Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, David Walker, Phillis Wheatley, and William Wells Brown.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-250
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English Department 1700-1900 requirement

AFCNA-251 Contemporary African American Literature II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine African American literature and culture in the postwar period as American identities are coalescing around the concept of the US as a world power. Specifically, our task during the semester will be to discuss the myriad ways black authors and artists attempt to interrogate the structure of racial hegemony by creating poetry and prose meant to expand notions of culture and form. We will also examine music, visual art, and advertisements from this era to have a greater sense of the black experience through various cultural representations. Writers will include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Michael S. Harper and bell hooks.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-251
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown

AFCNA-282 African American History from Emancipation to the Present

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the social, cultural, political, and economic history of African Americans from emancipation and Reconstruction through the present. Emphasis will fall on postwar southern social and economic developments, the rise of segregation, northern migrations, black class stratification, nationalism, the twentieth-century civil rights movement, and current trends in African American political, social, and economic life.

Crosslisted as: HIST-282
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

AFCNA-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

AFCNA-301 The Abolition Movement

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine the maturation of North American slave regimes after the American Revolution and the diverse activities of people who worked to abolish slavery. The assorted motives of white opponents of slavery and the actions of both free and enslaved African Americans to achieve freedom will be highlighted. We will analyze the mechanics of biracial coalition building and assess the historical legacy of these activists for subsequent social movements.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301AB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Morgan

AFCNA-308 Luminous Darkness: African American Social Thought After DuBois

Spring. Credits: 4

Examines the causes of and proposed solutions to 'the Negro problem' in post-Civil War American social thought and public policy. Begins with the life, work, and legacies of DuBois. Drawing on domestic and diasporic fictional and nonfictional depictions of black life in the 'DuBoisian century' the course considers different responses to his 1903 question, 'How does it feel to be a problem?' The course examines the development and contemporary status of black modernity and postmodernity in the writings of Robinson, Smith, Davis, Ransby, YamahttaTaylor, and others. Our focus on DuBoisian thought culminates in a careful examination of the emergence of racial capitalism in the 21st century.

Crosslisted as: CST-349LD
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Africana Studies.

AFCNA-341 Topics in Africana Studies

AFCNA-341AF Topics in Africana Studies: 'African American Spiritualities of Dissent'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course seeks to understand how protest fuels the creation and sustenance of black religious movements and novel spiritual systems in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine the dissentive qualities of selected African American activists, community workers, scholars, spiritual/religious leaders and creative writers. By the end of this course, students will be able to thoughtfully respond to the questions, "What is spirituality?"; "What is dissent?"; and "Has blackness required resistive spiritual communities?

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331AF, CST-349AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias

AFCNA-341AT Topics in Africana Studies: 'African Theater'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces the oral traditions, important playwrights, and aesthetic innovations in postcolonial literary theatre in some African societies. The oral theatre traditions of Africa are an example of the innate human quest to perform and will eventually be the basis for understanding some of the innovations made in African literary theatre. We shall also focus on writings by African writers and writers of African descent who deal with the post-colonial conditions of Black Africa and the African Diaspora. This class is designed to serve as a window into the continent of Africa: its people, its ideas, triumphs, struggles, and the complex histories emerging from its vastness and diversity.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330AT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Ofori
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Africana Studies, Theatre Arts, or Film, Media, Theater.

AFCNA-341DE Topics in Africana Studies: 'Development in Africa: A Critical History'

Spring. Credits: 4

How and why has Africa become synonymous with "development"? This class traces the historical construction of an idea so pervasive that it has become almost invisible. Moving through 200 years of history, we interrogate the ways that different projects for "developing" Africa have been envisioned, challenged, planned, implemented and lived. Throughout, we return to key questions. Why and how have the lives of African people become entangled with various ideologies of "progress"? What visions of African "development" have been articulated-in the West, in the African diaspora, on the continent itself? And, fundamentally, is "development" still a useful concept today?

Crosslisted as: HIST-341DE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti
Prereq: 8 credits in History.

AFCNA-341EM Topics in Africana Studies: 'The Age of Emancipation'

Spring. Credits: 4

This colloquium examines the causes and the course of the Civil War, its social, economic, and political results during Reconstruction, and the early roots of both de jure segregation and the civil rights movement. It will examine the process of emancipation from the perspective of social history. Violent conflicts over free labor, the establishment of sharecropping, and the political and economic policies pursued by various groups--freedpeople, ex-masters, northern policymakers, wage laborers, and African American women, for example--will be covered. African American viewpoints and histories will receive particular emphasis.

Crosslisted as: HIST-301EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Morgan
Prereq: 4 credits in History.

AFCNA-341TM Topics in Africana Studies: 'Toni Morrison'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the work and the centralized black world of the last American Nobel laureate in literature, Toni Morrison. Morrison is the author of eleven novels and multiple other works, including nonfiction and criticism. In a career that has spanned over forty years and has informed countless artists and writers, Morrison's expansive cultural reach can hardly be measured accurately. In this course we will endeavor to critically analyze the arc and the import of many of Morrison's writings. Readings include: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Jazz, Playing in the Dark, Paradise, and A Mercy.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-350TM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Bailey
Prereq: 4 credits in English or Africana Studies.

AFCNA-361 The Aquatic Life of Black Devotion

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Water informs religious and spiritual worldviews the world over; commonplace rituals from baptism to libation underwrite its prescience. The religious cultures of West and Central Africa, along with its multiple diasporas, theorize, encounter, and engage water centrally. Seminar participants will dive deeply into the water-based epistemologies of African and African diaspora religions, probing liturgical language, ritual performance and spiritual entities for aquatic common threads. Seminar participants will analyze the historical realities that have made water such a contested yet indispensable feature of black religious life.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-361
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

AFCNA-363 Rastafari

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From its counterhegemonic beginning as a nexus of Garveyism, Ethiopianism, and Pan-Africanism, Rastafari has shifted from a Caribbean theological movement to a new religious and socio-political movement globally. What were the epistemological tenets that enabled Rastafari to boast such a multi-sited diaspora? What was the role of reggae music in spreading the religious culture? How have women negotiated their roles within its textured prescriptions? Seminar participants will explore these questions, among others. Beyond understanding the diverse beliefs and practices of global Rastafari, seminar participants will consider some of the enduring motifs of black, dissentive religions as iterated through Rastafari.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-363
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

AFCNA-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ANTHR-105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Introduces the analysis of cultural diversity, including concepts, methods, and purposes in interpreting social, economic, political, and belief systems found in human societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard, P. Mangan, J. Roth, S. Thorner, M. Watson
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.

ANTHR-204 Anthropology of Modern Japan

Fall. Credits: 4

Since the mid-nineteenth century, Americans have viewed Japan as the Orient's most exotic and mysterious recess, alternately enticing and frightening in its difference. Intense economic relations and cultural exchange between Japan and the U.S. have not dispelled the image of Japanese society and culture as fundamentally different from our own. In this course, we will strive for greater understanding of shared experiences as well as historical particularities. Issues covered may vary from one semester to another, but frequently focus on work, women, minorities, and popular culture. Films and anthropological works provide ethnographic examples of some key concepts.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth

ANTHR-212 Shopping and Swapping: Cultures Consumption and Exchange

Spring. Credits: 4

We shop for our food, for our clothes, for our colleges. We purchase cars, manicures, and vacations. It seems that there is little that cannot be bought or sold. But we also give and receive gifts, exchange favors, 'go dutch' in restaurants, and invite friends for potlucks. This course examines exchange systems cross-culturally, in order to understand their cultural significance and social consequences. It explores how our own commodity exchange system, which appears to be no more than an efficient means of distributing goods and services, in fact contains intriguing symbolic dimensions similar to the gift exchange systems of Native North America, Melanesia, and Africa.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216 Special Topics in Anthropology

ANTHR-216AD Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Approaching Death: Culture, Health, and Science'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class challenges assumptions about death and dying as we examine its meanings and related practices in various cultural contexts. We will ask: what is universal about death and dying, and what is socially constructed? What can the social sciences, bio medicine, literature, the arts, and our own qualitative research tell us about the processes of dying, of grieving, and of providing care? In essence, what does it take to approach death?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
F. Aulino
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216AU Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Peoples and Cultures of Indigenous Australia'

Spring. Credits: 4

Indigenous peoples of Australia have long been objects of interest and imagination by outsiders-for their ceremonial practices, social structures, religious forms, aesthetic expressions, and relationships to land. This course will explore how Aboriginal peoples have struggled to reproduce and represent themselves and their lifeways on their own terms -- via visual media (pigment designs on bark, acrylic paintings on canvas); performances (cultural festivals, plays, other forms); archival interventions (photographic, textual, digital); museum exhibition; and various textual genres (autobiography, fiction, poetry). We will examine "traditional" and "contemporary" productions as all part of culture and culture-making in the present, emphasizing that this is ongoing and intercultural work.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216CM Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Culture and Mental Health'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Are psychiatric disease categories and treatment protocols universally applicable? How can we come to understand the lived experience of mental illness and abnormality? And how can we trace the roots of such experience - whether through brain circuitry, cultural practices, forms of power, or otherwise? In this course, we will draw on psychological anthropology, cultural psychiatry, science studies, and decolonizing methodologies to examine mental health and illness in terms of subjective experience, social processes, and knowledge production. Our goal will be to recognize the centrality of the social world as a force that defines and drives the incidence, occurrence, and course of mental illness, as well as to appreciate the complex relationship between professional and personal accounts of disorder.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-229CM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
F. Aulino
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216EF Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Ethnographic Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

Anthropologists have made films since the origins of the discipline and have long debated the role of film in the production of knowledge about others. This course explores the history, evolution, critiques, and contemporary practices of ethnographic film. We will consider key works that have defined the genre, and the innovations (and controversies) associated with them; we will engage documentary, observational, reflexive, and experimental cinema; and we will consider Indigenous media as both social activism and cultural reproduction. We will learn about film as a signifying practice, and grapple with the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation.

Crosslisted as: FMT-230EF
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105, or FLMST-201 or FLMST-202, or FMT-102 or FMT-103.

ANTHR-216HM Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Feminist Engagements with Hormones'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course takes a transdisciplinary and multi-sited approach to explore the social, political, biocultural, and legal complexities of hormones. Hormones "appear" in many discussions about reproductive and environmental justice, identity, health and chronicity. But what are hormones? What are their social, political and cultural histories? Where are they located? How do they act? The course will foster active learning, centering feminist pedagogies of collaborative inquiry. Examples of topics to be explored are: transnational/transcultural knowledge production about hormones; hormonal relations to sexgender, natureculture, bodymind; and hormone-centered actions and activism.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-241HR
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 4 credits in gender studies.

ANTHR-216HP Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Feminist Health Politics'

Fall. Credits: 4

Health is about bodies, selves and politics. We will explore a series of health topics from feminist perspectives. How do gender, sexuality, class, disability, and age influence the ways in which one perceives and experiences health and the access one has to health information and health care? Are heteronormativity, cissexism, or one's place of living related to one's health status or one's health risk? By paying close attention to the relationships between community-based narratives, activities of health networks and organizations and theory, we will develop a solid understanding of the historical, political and cultural specificities of health issues, practices, services and movements.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-241HP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 4 credits in gender studies.

ANTHR-216HR Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology and Human Rights: Between Devil's Advocate and Rights Advocacy'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores anthropological approaches to human rights -- a key theme of transnational politics and international law. Anthropologists have contributed to discussions on human rights since the UN Declaration and the field has provided a vibrant platform to analyze ideologies, politics, and practices surrounding human rights. We will survey an array of anthropological studies that approach human rights from the perspective of cultural relativism, contextualization, advocacy, and practice. Students will gain a critical perspective on the seemingly universal rhetoric of human rights by learning how it produces diverse effects in places such as Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Babül
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216LA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Latin America'

Fall. Credits: 4

Latin America has undergone massive political, economic and cultural transformations since the end of the Cold War. Indeed, during the final decades of the twentieth century, much of the region embraced neoliberal governance and free market capitalism. However, by the turn of the millennium, many Latin American governments had made a sharp "turn to the Left," as states began to intervened more directly in the economy, promote alternative imaginings of modernization, and recognize greater rights for Indigenous and Afro-descendent peoples. This course will begin with a focus on these shifts in governance, but largely focuses on the consequences of these changes within people's everyday lives.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216NF Special Topics in Anthropology: 'The Anthropology of Food'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Drawing on a holistic, multidisciplinary perspective, this course considers food as a lens through which issues such as gender, family, community, nationality, religion and class can be more deeply understood. Food and drink are examined not only for the biological needs they fill but also in terms of their spiritual and cultural dimensions. We will explore the journey of food production, preparation, distribution and consumption nationally and internationally. Local, national and global networks are analyzed as we examine the role food plays in creating and mediating socioeconomic and political relationships. Food scarcity, security, sovereignty and sustainability are also considered.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
P. Mangan
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-216PY Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Play'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We associate play with childhood, a time of spontaneous and creative activity, in contrast to the boring routine of adult responsibilities. And yet play is more than just fun and games. It is through play that children develop lasting cognitive and social skills. For adults too, there can be serious play -- play that has real consequence -- play that shapes the intimate lives of individuals, as well as entire social formations. In this course, we will explore play cross-culturally, from the Balinese cockfight to American football, from gambling to roll playing. We will design games based on the anthropological readings in order to appreciate the game-like qualities of many domains of life.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-221 Anthropology of Media

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course critically examines how media make a difference in diverse peoples' lives. How are media produced, circulated, and consumed? Together, we will explore the material forms through which subjectivities, collectivities, and histories are produced; and the social practices of constructing and contesting national identities, forging alternative political visions, transforming religious practice, and producing new relationships. In this 21st century, media are not just indispensable to what is known, but also, to how we know. Case studies will include film, TV, photography, art, archives, journalism, and digital platforms; ethnographic examples will be drawn from around the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-230 Language in Culture and Society

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Language is integral to human experiences across cultures. Interpersonal communication holds social worlds together, lending them significance. This course examines language as a complex, embodied field of cultural practice and performance. It bridges core concepts within linguistic anthropology and semiotics -- such as relativity, indexicality, performance, and language ideology -- with critical analyses of social fields including race, gender, and sexuality. Illustrative examples are drawn from Western and non-Western societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-235 History of Anthropological Thought

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will review the key issues and paradigm shifts in the development of anthropology from its foundations in classical thought through its emergence as an independent discipline to its coming-of-age in the 1960s. The readings will include works from the American, British, and Continental traditions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-240 Medical Anthropology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to medical anthropology. Core topics will include: the culture of medicine, the interaction of biology and society, the experience of illness, caregiving, addiction, violence, and humanitarian intervention. We will explore how ethnographic research and social theory can enrich understanding of illness and care, raising issues for and about medicine and public health often left out of other disciplinary approaches. Throughout, we will emphasize the vantage point of the local worlds in which people experience, narrate, and respond to illness and suffering, and the ways in which large-scale forces contribute to such local experience.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
F. Aulino
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-246 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Religion counts among anthropology's most central and enduring areas of interest. This course traces a history of anthropological attention to belief and ritual from the nineteenth century to the present. We will read classic and contemporary ethnographic studies of religious systems, covering topics that include spirits and animism, totemism, magic, witchcraft, mythology, taboo, sacrilege, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, religion and modernity, and secularism. The course will scrutinize "religion" itself as a cultural and analytical category, and it will question how an anthropological perspective alters perceptions of the global politics of religion today.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225MG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: ANTHR-105.

ANTHR-275 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Fall. Credits: 4

Topics include research design, ethical dilemmas, and the relationship between academic research and community based learning. Applied fieldwork and presentations are an integral part of this course.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
J. Roth
Restrictions: This course is limited to Anthropology majors.
Prereq: Anthropology 105.

ANTHR-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ANTHR-316 Special Topics in Anthropology

ANTHR-316EG Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Eggs and Embryos: Innovations in Reproductive and Genetic Technologies'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on emerging innovations in the development, use and governance of reproductive and genetic technologies (RGTs). How do novel developments at the interface of fertility treatment and biomedical research raise both new and enduring questions about the'naturalness' of procreation, the politics of queer families, the im/possibilities of disabilities, and transnational citizenship? Who has a say in what can be done and for which purposes? We will engage with ethnographic texts, documentaries, policy statements, citizen science activist projects, and social media in order to closely explore the diversity of perspectives in this field.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333EG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

ANTHR-316ET Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Advanced Seminar in Ethnomusicology'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designed for music and non-music majors, this advanced seminar examines core theoretical and methodological issues in ethnomusicology and the debates that have shaped its practice since its origins in the early twentieth century as comparative musicology. Drawing on musical traditions from different parts of the world and supplemented by workshops conducted by visiting professional musicians, the course explores the interdisciplinary approaches that inform how ethnomusicologists study the significance of music "in" and "as" culture. Topics covered will include ethnographic methods, the intersection of musicological and anthropological perspectives, the political significance of musical hybridity, applied ethnomusicology, and sound studies.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-374
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Omojola
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ANTHR-316LA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Race and Religion in Latin America'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course will begin with an investigation of the proto-racial and religious categories through which Europeans in the early modern era understood human difference. From there, we will trace how these notions were re-conceptualized in the centuries following the encounter between Europeans, Africans, and the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas. As we examine this history -- including the emergence of slavery, eugenics, mestizaje, and Liberation Theology -- we will pay particular attention to how interwoven racial and religious hierarchies were both constructed and resisted. The final section of the course will concentrate on the contemporary entanglements of race and religion in the region.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331LA
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology, Religion, or Latin American Studies.

ANTHR-316LV Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Living in End Times: Religion and Climate Change'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Religion and climate change might seem to be an odd combination. After all, we tend to imagine religion as the domain of faith, emotion, and the otherworldly and the climate as the realm of science, objective knowledge, and the here and now. Nevertheless, this course investigates the sometimes surprising connections between them. For example, how do religious communities work to promote or oppose political action on climate change? How do religious conceptions about God's relationship with nature or with humanity have consequences for adherents' views on climate change? How do the futures predicted by climate models and those prophesied in sacred texts affect people's actions today?

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331LV
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in anthropology or religion.

ANTHR-316LW Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Ethnographies of Law'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on the anthropological study of the legal field. The class will begin with a survey of some classical texts that underpin the legal thought in the modern era. We will then see how anthropologists contributed to the study of law by conceptualizing it as part of larger socio-political processes and as a field that includes social relations, processes, and practices. The students will learn how some key legal issues such as dispute management, decision making, and reconciliation are actualized in diverse cultural and social settings, to think critically and evaluate legal processes in a multicultural setting and in plural societies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. Babül
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316ME Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of the Political in the Contemporary Middle East'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on anthropological studies of how power - both in its open and hidden forms - manifests itself and shapes everyday life in the contemporary Middle East. It explores how authority is established and contested in various domains including bureaucracy and the state; sexuality and the family; religion and civil society; markets and the media. We will trace how experiences of colonization, imperialism, modernization, nationalism, capitalism, occupation, war and revolt mold the conditions of living for peoples of the Middle East. We will also examine how specific forms of knowledge production attribute coherence to the region, allowing its imagination as an object of intervention in the name of development and security.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Babül
Prereq: 8 Credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316MU Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology in/of Museums'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is a museum, and how is it relevant to all of our lives? This course considers "the museum" as an object of ethnographic inquiry, examining it as a cultural institution perpetually under negotiation and reconfiguration. We reflect on how museum principles of classification, practices of collection and exhibition, and the uptake of digital technologies are central to what and how we know. We investigate and analyze museums as social actors in anthropological debates on power, representation, materiality, value, authenticity, state-making, Indigenous sovereignty, and the preservation and activation of contemporary cultures. The museum is never simply a repository of artifacts, artworks, histories, or scientific inventions, but also a site of tremendous creativity and a field of complex social relations.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-301MU
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology or Art History.
Advisory: Students enrolled in or considering the Nexus in Museums, Archives, and Public History are encouraged to take this course

ANTHR-316NC Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Across Nature and Culture: Anthropology and the Environment'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the complex, dynamic relationships between "nature" and "culture" in various systems of human thought and practice, past and present. We explore worldviews predicated on reciprocal exchanges between human and non-human entities, as well as those anchored in hierarchical relations of extraction and exploitation of natural resources. Students draw on anthropological methods to observe and interpret contested local sites of biodiversity and resource management. Special attention is given to struggles over the rights of indigenous peoples to manage local ecosystems and natural resources and to collaborative partnerships nurturing environmental sustainability and restoration.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Auslander
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316NW Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Religion: It's Not What It Used to Be'

Spring. Credits: 4

Not so long ago, anthropologists had a relatively clear understanding of what they meant by "religion" -- any and all manner of beliefs and practices related to the supernatural or the sacred. However, in recent years, religion has been rethought in light of its own specific Western history, its normative tendencies, and its place in colonialism and other projects of domination. This course will begin with a review of the conventional ways that anthropologists have conceived of religion. It will then move on to investigate the exciting new theoretical and ethnographic perspectives that have emerged to more fully take into account the diverse world-making practices that humans engage in.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331NW
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology or Religion.

ANTHR-316PA Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Outside the Frame: The Social Lives of Photography and Archives'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Archival and photographic practices emerge from shared paradigms seeking to know and classify the world. This seminar explores what archives and photographs are and what they do -- what are their conventions and cultures of use, and how are these being creatively resisted? We examine photographs as archives themselves, as well as vehicles of remembering, evidence of kin relationships, tools of national discourse, and objects of exchange. We reflect on how digital forms are changing how we know ourselves and our histories. We will learn together about how photography and archives are mobilized as people in myriad contexts strive for belonging, recognition, understanding, and change.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105 and 4 additional credits in Anthropology or Art History.

ANTHR-316PG Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Who's Involved?: Participatory Governance, Emerging Technologies and Feminism'

Fall. Credits: 4

Deep brain stimulation, genome sequencing, regenerative medicine...Exploring practices of 'participatory governance' of emerging technologies, we will examine the formal and informal involvement of citizens, patients, health professionals, scientists and policy makers. What initiatives exist at local, national and transnational levels to foster science literacy? How do lived experiences of nationality, ability, class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality become visible and/or disappear within constructed frameworks of participatory governance? How can feminist ethnographic research and feminist theory contribute to a larger project of democratizing knowledge production and governance?

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333PG
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: 8 credits in gender studies or anthropology.

ANTHR-316RK Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Risk'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We live in an age of uncertainty. Dangers, many of our own making, confront us at every turn - in the form of global warming, market collapses, tainted food, epidemics, and accidents at work and on roads. Terrorist attacks and crime have led to the increased control of urban public spaces. Modern institutions and technologies of risk (probability, insurance, audits, sundry regulation) strive to tame chance, to make it manageable, and even potentially profitable, and have contributed to emergent cultures of risk. In this course, we examine these technologies of risk and associated cultural forms, in relation to other means by which people have dealt with uncertainty in the past.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Roth
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316RT Special Topics in Anthropology: 'The Anthropology of Sport'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines, from an anthropological perspective, sport as a social practice. We will investigate how sports and sport cultures form, maintain, rupture, and challenge identities, from the personal to the national scales. We will also look at how these have evolved through time, what changes have been advocated for and resisted, and what the larger stakes of sports culture are outside of their specific performative spaces. Using a variety of methodologies, we will examine the meaning invested in various sporting endeavors, as well as how these vary across time and cultural context. Topics include soccer fandom in the UK, Title IX legislation in the United States, Maori masculinity and rugby in New Zealand, ritual and religion in sports practices worldwide, and the political economy of hosting the Olympic games. We will also look at the relationship between sports and nationalism, sports and gender, and the global political economy of multibillion-dollar athletic industries.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
A. Strickland
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316SE Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Anthropology of Secularism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is secularism? For many of us, the answer is obvious: the world without religious belief, or the separation of church and state, or even the "really real" world. In recent years, scholars in number fields have begun to question these common sense notions about secularism. In this course, we will investigate this rapidly expanding literature and the critical lines of inquiry it has opened up: Under what specific cultural and historic conditions did secularism first emerge? Is secularism experienced today in the same way throughout the world? If not, how do they vary? What ways of being and living does secularism encourage or allow to flourish? Which does it stunt, block, or prohibit?

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331SE
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
W. Girard
Prereq: 8 credits in Anthropology.

ANTHR-316SP Special Topics in Anthropology: 'Space, Place, and Way-finding'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What makes a home feel like home? What makes a neighborhood feel alive and vibrant? Architects and urban planners develop elaborate designs meant for specific kinds of human uses, and yet we find that people often use spaces for purposes quite different from those that planners intended. In this course, we will explore the ways in which people dwell in the abstract spaces of planners, turning them into inhabited places. We will also explore the ways that people navigate through and between these spaces that have been compartmentalized into politically and socially bounded units. A variety of theoretical perspectives will be applied in diverse cultural cases to better understand the ways in which peoples inhabit the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Roth
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology department.

ANTHR-342 Science as Culture

Fall. Credits: 4

What is science? The progressive discovery of Nature's laws? The process of honing claims about the universe? Is science the act of postulating and testing hypotheses? Or is it tinkering, experimentation? This course offers an advanced introduction to cultural and anthropological studies of science. Through careful readings of work in areas such as the sociology of scientific knowledge, actor-network theory, feminist science studies, and affect theory, we will explore the sciences as complex systems of cultural production. The course will culminate in a series of critical ethnographic studies of how the sciences shape concepts and experiences of race, the body, gender, and sexuality.

Crosslisted as: CST-342
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

ANTHR-350 Issues in Contemporary Anthropological Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the major theoretical frameworks developed and debated by anthropologists of the past two decades. It covers core issues in anthropological epistemology, the relationship of ethnography to social and cultural theory, trends in anthropological analysis, and the place of anthropological theory in broader academic and public discourses.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.; This course is limited to Anthropology majors.
Prereq: 8 credits in anthropology including ANTHR-235.
Advisory: Anthropology majors should take ANTHR-235 before ANTHR-350.
Notes: Five College students must obtain instructor permission to register.

ANTHR-352 Digital Cultures

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In the last decades, digital media have become integral to our quotidian lives as well as to myriad translocal processes. "New" technologies are hailed in celebratory narratives of democratization and participation, access and innovation, enchantment and possibility; and newly-available gadgets, devices, and platforms are taken up with great speed and facility. This course is designed to ethnographically explore "the digital," as both a site and subject of scholarly inquiry, in which we think through how this form is shifting the ways in which we know ourselves, our social networks, our bodies, and the dynamic cultural and political contexts in which we live.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Thorner
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

ANTHR-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARCH-203 Scene Design for Theater and Film

Fall. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce the history, art, and techniques of designing sets for theater and film. Students will learn how sets have been created in the past, how a designer approaches a script, how a designer's work supports the director's vision, how it illuminates a production for the audience, and what methods and techniques are used in the execution of the process. Students will have the opportunity to exercise their visual imaginations, through the creation of designs for a script. They will engage in script analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, technical drawing, model building, and related techniques and methodologies.

Crosslisted as: FMT-240SD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Notes: lab; $50 materials fee. Any additional design supplies and materials are the responsibility of the student.

ARCH-205 Introduction to Architecture

ARCH-205AD Introduction to Architecture: 'Design'

Spring. Credits: 4

This studio course introduces a series of design investigations around particular themes and approaches to architecture and the built environment. Students will develop visual communication and architectural design skills (sketches, plans, elevations, sections, projected drawings and model making) to tackle interdisciplinary and socially pertinent design problems. Creative and indexical study and analysis will be used to generate and foster a broad range of concepts and language to solve architectural and design issues involving site, inhabitation, function, form, materiality, light and space. Our goal is to apply creative techniques in art and sculpture to the creation of meaningful space.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Schumacher
Advisory: One semester of design or drawing is recommended
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of materials.

ARCH-221 Digital Architecture Studio

Spring. Credits: 4

This architecture studio is an investigation into architecture and the built environment. Students develop and apply digital architectural skills, including sketches, plans, elevations, models, and diagramming to design problems. The course focuses on the 3D modeling program Rhinoceros, but also introduces the Adobe Creative Suite and digital fabrication tools. Creative and indexical study are used to generate the concepts and language necessary to identify and define spaces. Our objective is to solve both simple and complex architectural issues involving site, construction, inhabitation, function, form and space through rigorous and creative computer-based design work. The course will include a combination of software instruction and creative studio design projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. Long
Prereq: Introductory architecture studio. Contact the instructor for permission if you have taken a Five College architecture studio course that the registration system does not recognize.

ARCH-225 Intermediate Studies in Architectural Design

ARCH-225ED Intermediate Studies in Architecture: 'Environmental Principles'

Fall. Credits: 4

This hybrid studio addresses environmental principles with lectures and work sessions integrated with design projects. The effect of form on light and shadow are investigated as students research architectural solutions sited in their current location. Using daylight, the sun's movement, and sun-path diagrams, students will design, draw and build a solar clock. Knowledge gained will be developed to incorporate ideas of community through an extended design problem. Students will be asked to present design solutions using both drawings and models - both physical and digital. An introduction to the computer software Rhinoceros will allow students to design and document their projects digitally.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Schumacher
Prereq: ARCH-205 or equivalent.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of materials.

ARCH-280 Topics in Architectural Studies

ARCH-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARCH-305 Advanced Topics in Architecture

ARCH-305CS Advanced Topics in Architecture: 'Capstone Studio'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This studio provides a structured creative environment for students to explore and design in both an individual and collaborative setting. Students develop their own individual design projects, identifying their approach, then executing their creative acts throughout the semester. This course is highly interdisciplinary in nature, yet designed for students developing projects in various areas of architecture and design, environmental studies, and urban planning. Discussion and writing are integral to this studio. The semester culminates in a collective exhibition. Students must have an individual project in mind or in progress at the start of the term.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Darling
Notes: A considerable amount of self-directed work outside of class hours is expected from students.

ARCH-305UE Advanced Topics in Architecture: 'Public Space and Everyday Life in Globalizing Spanish Cities'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine everyday urban life and public space in Spain from the post-Civil War period (1939) to 2021. We'll approach cities as dynamic global networks shaped by cultures, politics, economies, ideologies, memories, and imaginations. Through literary, visual, and theoretical texts, we'll explore the in/exclusivity of large-scale urban phenomena such as street design, gentrification, city ordinances, globalization, and mass tourism. From a lesser-known ethnographic angle, we'll also bring into dialogue the power within everyday practices (walking, sitting, remembering, shopping, placemaking) as well as subjects and objects (street vendors, immigrants, urban furniture, historic buildings).

Crosslisted as: SPAN-350UE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Saltzman
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

ARCH-311 Makerspace Design-Build Studio

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The rise of digital fabrication processes has blurred the traditional division of labor enabling architects and designers not only to draw but to also fabricate projects, often using the very same programs. Following the rise in CAD/CAM has been a burgeoning Maker movement as more and more individuals have rediscovered the joys (and sometimes frustrations) of realizing projects within a collaborative environment. This class will introduce students to the theories and approaches to traditional and digital making through a series of exercises. Students will use 3D modeling tools to develop both conceptual and functional objects using the design-build and/or rapid-prototyping process. The course will prepare students to realize projects using the facilities of the Fimbel Lab in the future.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. Long
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: ARCH-205, and Digital Design Studio at Hampshire College or Smith College.
Notes: Interested students must fill out the form found on this page: https://www.mtholyoke.edu/sites/default/files/acad/architec tural/docs/ARCH-311-S21-Application.pdf
Email the completed form to Thom Long at tlong@hampshire.edu with the subject line: ARCH-311 Application.

ARCH-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARCH-395P Independent Study with Practicum

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARTH-100 Image and Environment

ARTH-100PW Image and Environment: 'The Power of Images'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Bombarded daily by thousands of images, we often lack sufficient visual literacy to understand fully how they shape our reality. The course explores roles that images have played in earlier cultures and in our own, how people view, analyze, and articulate their understanding of the visual world. Topics include living statues, votive offerings, voodoo figures, relics, idolatry, iconoclasm, propaganda, and censorship.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

ARTH-100SE Image and Environment: 'Ways of Seeing'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores how artists, images, and objects have sparked revolution, defined identity, changed how people think and act, reflected and made history. We will examine moments of major change in the arts through close attention to specific themes, individuals, and works from the last seven centuries. The goal is not a fact-filled, comprehensive, strictly chronological overview, but rather an understanding of the ways in which the western visual legacy has profoundly shaped how we see the world around us.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews

ARTH-100WA Image and Environment: 'Western Art: 1400-2000'

Fall. Credits: 4

An introduction to painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Classes are organized around five focused topics: Renaissance Florence; the artist in the seventeenth century; art and revolution; nineteenth-century realism and abstraction. Lectures will be complimented by class discussion.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti

ARTH-101 The Built Environment

Spring. Credits: 4

This course surveys architecture from the ancient world to the present as both a functional response to human activity and as a medium that expresses cultural values. In the service of domestic life, religious ritual, political agendas, commerce, and leisure, architecture reflects and shapes the natural environment, technology, economics, and aesthetic taste. While the history of Western architecture constitutes the primary touchstone, we will pursue themes that include sites and buildings, cities, and sites from around the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Davis

ARTH-104 Talking Pictures: An Introduction to Film

Spring. Credits: 4

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge!.

Crosslisted as: FMT-103
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti

ARTH-105 Arts of Asia

Fall. Credits: 4

This multicultural course introduces students to the visual arts of Asia from the earliest times to the present. In a writing- and speaking-intensive environment, students will develop skills in visual analysis and art historical interpretation. Illustrated class lectures, group discussions, museum visits, and a variety of writing exercises will allow students to explore architecture, sculpture, painting, and other artifacts in relation to the history and culture of such diverse countries as India, China, Cambodia, Korea, and Japan.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-108
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha

ARTH-202 Talking Pictures: An Introduction to Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti

ARTH-216 Empire: The Visual World of Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

At its height, the Roman Empire spanned a vast area, from modern Scotland to Libya and Iraq. Within that territory lived peoples of multiple races, languages, and religions. The course explores the art and architecture created in this global culture from its beginning in 30 BCE to the dedication of the first Christian capital, Constantinople, in 330 CE. Subjects include the arts of engineering and city planning, public propaganda, arena spectacles, homes of life and the afterlife, and mystery religions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Bergmann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-222 Age of the Cathedrals: Gothic Art in Europe, 1100-1500

Spring. Credits: 4

A historical survey of medieval architecture, monumental sculpture, and painting of France, England, Germany, and Italy. The course concentrates on the great church as a multimedia environment and on the religious, political and social roles of art in society.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Davis
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-230 Italian Renaissance Art

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This survey outlines the arts in Italy from the late thirteenth to sixteenth centuries, a time of major cultural transformation. Our approach will be primarily geographic, focusing on individual cities and courts in order to understand the social networks that linked artists with their patrons and publics. We will also address key themes such as the functions of art; the role of women in the arts; the changing status of artists; portraiture and the fashioning of identity; the rise of print; art and ideas about faith, love, desire, and marriage; and the cross-cultural links between Italian artists and their colleagues far away.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Maier
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-231 Northern Renaissance Art

Fall. Credits: 4

This course covers the arts in Northern Europe during a time of upheaval. We will look at developments in panel painting, manuscript illumination, printmaking, and sculpture from the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries--examining shifting patterns of patronage and production along with shifting styles, techniques, and media. We will consider major artists like Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer, and Pieter Bruegel, as well as seismic cultural shifts such as the print revolution, the emergence of the woman artist, the Reformation, and the origins of the art market.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-233 Renaissance and Baroque Architecture in Italy

Fall. Credits: 4

This course focuses on architecture in Italy--including churches, palaces, villas, and urban planning--from the 1400s to the 1600s. In this period, architects took their cues from the classical tradition even as they carved out their own territory, developing new techniques and perfecting old ones to realize their designs. We will trace shifting architectural practice through key figures from Brunelleschi to Bernini, and through the lens of larger cultural forces. We will also examine buildings in light of the painted and sculpted decorative programs that were often integral to their overall effect.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: First-year students may seek permission if they have 4 credits in Art History.

ARTH-241 Nineteenth-Century European Art: Neoclassicism to Impressionism

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will survey art in Europe from the French Revolutionary era to the last quarter of the nineteenth century -- or, in the language of art history, from the neo-classical painters (David and his atelier) to the great painters of modern life in Paris (Manet and his followers). This chronology represents one of the most important transformations in the history of art: the origins and early development of what we today call "modern art." We will spend considerable time tracing this difficult passage, pausing here and there to readjust ourselves to the shifting language of art and to orient art's relationship to the modern public.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-242 History of Photography: The First Hundred Years

Fall. Credits: 4

This course surveys the first century of photography, beginning with its putative birth in 1839 and following its shifts and turns until the eve of World War II. We will look at a variety of photographic types: the daguerreotype, calotype, tintype, albumen and gelatin silver prints, and more. We will assess a range of practices: studio portraiture, commercial pictures, vernacular photography, journalism, and the fine arts. And we will follow camerawork in a variety of settings: China, England, France, Germany, Mexico, Russia, and the U.S.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-243 Architecture 1890-1990

ARTH-243AR Architecture 1890-1990: 'Building the Modern Environment'

Fall. Credits: 4

An exploration of major movements and personalities in architecture from the late nineteenth century to the present. Emphasizing the United States against the background of European developments, the course considers the search by architects, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, and Frank Gehry, for a language of form and space that captures the contemporary spirit as it elevates society to a higher plane of existence. Discussion focuses on issues of technology and utopia, the skyscraper, and the collision of tradition, modernity, and postmodernism in architecture since 1945.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Davis
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-244 Global Modernism

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines the great ruptures in late 19th and early 20th century art that today we call modernist. It relates aspects of that art to the equally great transformations outside the studio: political revolution, the rise and consolidation of industrial capitalism, colonization and its discontents, and world war. It compares different kinds of modernisms, including those in Austria, France, Germany, Mexico, Spain and Russia.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-245 Art of Cold War Modernity

Spring. Credits: 4

This course traces the different paths of painting, sculpture, and mixed media in the United States and, to a lesser extent, Western Europe between 1945 and 1989 -- that is, between the end of World War II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. We will begin with both the "climax" and "crisis" of modernism in midcentury and the movements and works that the crisis spawned. In the second half of the course, we will follow art's relationship to a variety of postmodern subjects and debates. Throughout, we will measure the effects of geopolitical tensions on the visual arts. On a weekly basis, we will read a wide range of primary and secondary sources, with essays by art historians, critics, and artists. Overall, we will try to understand ambitious art's relationship with key social, political, and cultural developments during an intense four decades of worldwide change and uncertainty.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-246 Photography As Art

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In case studies beginning in the 1930s and continuing to the present, this course explores the many uses of photographs as art. It regards pictures made as individual art works as well as those objects using photographs and photographic materials as parts of an ensemble. We will trace a chronological but also winding path through different regions of the world, including experiments in Africa, Asia, and Europe, in addition to a more prominent concern with those in North America. Some of the case studies may include works by Ansel Adams, Eleanor Antin, Diane Arbus, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank, Anselm Kiefer, An-My Le, Dinh Q. Le, Robert Mapplethorpe, Martin Parr, and Fazal Sheikh.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-250 American Art

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A survey of painting and sculpture, this course introduces students to the work of individual artists. Classes also develop ways of looking at and thinking about art as the material expression of American social, political, and cultural ideas, including the depictions of nature, race, revolution, and country life. The course focuses on 'American Masters': Copley, Stuart, Cole, Church, Eakins, Homer, Sargent, Whistler, and Cassatt are some of the key artists.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-261 Arts of China

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will survey arts of China from the neolithic period to the twentieth century. Class lectures will analyze ceramics, bronze vessels, sculpture, architecture, calligraphy, and painting in relation to various religious ideas and political formations that took place in China's long history.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-262 Arts of Japan

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the special characteristics of Japanese art and architecture, from the early asymmetry of Jomon pottery and the abstraction of Haniwa figures to the later elite arts of the aristocratic, military, and merchant classes: narrative scroll painting, gold-ground screens, and the 'floating world' of the color woodblock print. A historical survey of the arts of Japan, highlighting the interplay of art with religious and political issues.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-263 Arts of India

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The multicultural course will survey architecture, sculpture, painting, and other arts of India from the earliest times to the twenty-first century. Students will explore the various arts as material expressions of a relationship between religious beliefs, geography and cultural conditions of the subcontinent of India in different historical periods. Class sessions will also provide opportunities for an examination of cross-cultural issues relating to the study of non-Western art in a Western academic discipline. Students will develop strategies for visual analysis and critical thinking through written assignments, class discussions, and close reading of scholarly articles.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225AN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-271 Arts of Islam: Book, Mosque, and Palace

Fall. Credits: 4

Through investigation of major works produced in the Muslim world between the seventh and seventeenth centuries from Spain to India, this course explores the ways in which art and architecture were used to embody the faith, accommodate its particular needs, and express the power of its rulers. Topics include the calligraphy of the Qur'an, illustrated literature, the architecture of the mosque, and the aristocratic palace.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-271
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Davis
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290 Issues in Art History

ARTH-290AP Issues in Art History: 'Ancient Painting and Mosaic'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course treats the themes, techniques, and contexts of painting and mosaic in the ancient Mediterranean. From Bronze Age palaces to early Byzantine churches, surfaces were embellished with frescoes, pebbles, glass and jewels. These might be rendered in complex geometric shapes or with mythological scenes. Portable vases displayed elegantly drawn figures. We will examine the unique effects of each medium by working with original objects in the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Some exposure to the classical world of Greece and Rome or art history.

ARTH-290BC Issues in Art History: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'

Spring. Credits: 4

Indian popular cinema, known commonly as Bollywood, is usually understood to have weak storylines, interrupted by overblown spectacles and distracting dance numbers. The course explores the narrative structure of Bollywood as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a "constellation of interruptions". We will learn to see Bollywood historically, as a cultural form that brings India's visual and performative traditions into a unique cinematic configuration. We will analyze a selection of feature films, read scholarly articles, participate in debates, write guided assignments, and pursue independent research papers in order to understand Bollywood's uniqueness in relation to world cinema.

Crosslisted as: FMT-230BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290BK Issues in Art History: 'Art of the Book'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will offer an integrative approach to the study of illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. We'll begin with a unit on the invention and early history of the book, but the main focus of study will be 1350-1500, from the rise of the commercial lay manuscript industry in urban centers in Europe to the production of incunabula, early printed books. We will study books made for devotion, instruction, entertainment, and pleasure, including sacred and secular texts such as Books of Hours and vernacular literature, legends, and histories. Our study will encompass the stunning pictorial programs of miniature paintings and marginalia as well as the patronage, production, structure, text, decoration, use, and after-life of the book. Topics include technology and materials, integration of text and image, makers (monastic, courtly, and commercial), and readers and collectors, via first-hand study of digitized manuscripts in collections around the world.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225BK
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290CM Issues in Art History: 'Classical Myth in Ancient Art'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the stories of gods and mortals represented in Greek and Roman art. We will examine visual modes of storytelling in sculpture, mosaic, fresco, lamps, and gems. In which contexts did such stories appear, why, and what do we know about their reception among ancient viewers?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290CR Issues in Art History: 'The City of Rome From Romulus to Constantine'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A detailed survey of the archaeology of the city of Rome from its origin in the early Iron Age to the beginning of the fourth century CE. The principal monuments and architectural development of the ancient city will be discussed against a broader cultural and historical background, with an emphasis on the powerful families and individuals responsible for the shaping of the urban landscape, and the specific social and political circumstances that gave the monuments meaning.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-230
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Landon
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290MB Issues in Art History: 'Medieval Bodies'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course we will examine how medieval European thinkers and artists theorized and visualized the body in ways that are vastly different from how the body is conceptualized today. Indeed, the "medieval body" was not a monolithic entity, but rather a shifting constellation of ideas and practices that waxed, waned, and coexisted throughout the Middle Ages. A body could be understood as an earthly body -- sexed, fleshly, corruptible -- as well as a heavenly and divine body, including Christ's own. Our considerations will further contextualize representations of gendered, racialized, clerical, monstrous, animal, virginal, non-Christian, heretical, and resurrected bodies. Artworks and monuments include icons, reliquaries, altarpieces and other church decorations and liturgical objects, sculptural programs, illuminated manuscripts, prints, and incunabula.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225MB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290NE Issues in Art History: 'Nature and Environment in the Ancient World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course examines landscape design and images of nature in ancient societies, including not only Egypt, Greece, and Rome, but cultures along the Silk Road. How was the natural world conceived, and what roles did it play in religion, politics, and social life? The historical meanings of landscape provide a basis for discussing current issues of technology, tourism, and climate change. The course emphasizes looking and describing, as we move between the classroom, museums, and the outdoors.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department

ARTH-290PA Issues in Art History: 'Art, Politics, and the Past'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course considers controversies about monuments and objects. We examine looting from the Roman empire to the present; the destruction of archaeological sites by the Taliban and ISIL; and debates about public statues in the United States. Does the custodial universalism of prestigious institutions, such as the British Museum, legitimate a country's rights to own and exhibit the world's heritage? We will discuss the illicit trafficking of unprovenanced antiquities, how collecting contributes to the destruction of archaeological context, and the impacts of development and tourism on sites and monuments.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
B. Bergmann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-290PM Issues in Art History: 'Pompeii'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Buried in the volcanic eruption of 79 CE, Pompeii provides an astounding level of preservation of temples, baths, houses, shops, theaters, and streets and the arts that embellished them: fresco, mosaic, sculpture, and gardens. The rediscovery of the ancient site since the eighteenth century had a significant impact upon European art and literature. The course examines the surviving environment and artifacts created in the late republic and early empire. It also considers the history of archaeological and art historical methods, and the romantic visions of Pompeii in art, theatre, and film up to the present.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Advisory: Some exposure to the classical world of Greece and Rome or art history.

ARTH-290TH Issues in Art History: 'The City of Athens from Theseus to Alaric'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A detailed survey of the principal surviving monuments and the overall architectural development of the city of Athens from its origins in the Bronze Age to the end of the 4th century C.E. The archaeological evidence will be discussed against a broader cultural and historical background, with an emphasis on the specific people and events that helped to shape the city and the general social and political circumstances that gave the monuments meaning.

Crosslisted as: CLASS-231
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Landon

ARTH-290TW Issues in Art History: 'The Trojan War in Art'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The aim of the course is to acquaint students with the Homeric legends of Troy and the famous Homecomings of the heroes Odysseus, Agamemnon, and Aeneas. We examine visual modes of storytelling in various media from classical antiquity to the present. How and why have such stories been represented, in which contexts, and what is the reason for their ongoing social relevance?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
B. Bergmann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ARTH-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARTH-300 Seminar

ARTH-300CR Seminar: 'Critical Approaches to Art Historical Study'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Intended as a kind of 'boot camp' for Art History majors, this course gives a major overview of the field, its methods, and its professional possibilities. Students will design their own research projects, conceptualize exhibitions, and hear from professionals working in various sectors of the art world. They will hone their research, writing, and speaking skills, while learning what it means to interpret art through lenses such as formalism, Marxism, gender, and postcolonialism. Students will also write applications for internships, jobs, and graduate programs--the goal being to consider how the art history skills they have acquired as undergraduates can translate into life after college, in the art world and beyond.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Maier
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Art History.

ARTH-300PR Seminar: 'The Printed Image in the West'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Drawing heavily on the first-hand study of prints at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum and other local collections, this course will survey the invention and practice of printmaking in the West. Our foundation will be prints from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, with further study of works up through the twenty-first century, depending on student interest. The focus of the class will be on student analysis, research, discussion, and presentations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Art History.

ARTH-301 Topics in Art History

ARTH-301AF Topics in Art History: 'African American Art'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course facilitates a critical dialogue between the creative contributions of African American artists and mainstream developments in American Art. Specifically, the course explores the central themes and debates in the visual and cultural history of art made by African Americans (1750-present).Through the close study of art objects, engagement with primary sources, group discussions, and independent research, students will gain an understanding of African American art as both a distinct cultural expression and an integral part of the story of American art. In their study of art made by African Americans, students will develop advanced and transferable visual and cultural literacy skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Sparling Williams
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in art history.

ARTH-301BK Topics in Art History: 'The Art of the Book: From Manuscript to Incunabula'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The subject of this course is the book, from its invention in the late antique era to the advent of printing in the fifteenth century, in Europe and Western Asia. We will study books made for devotion, instruction, entertainment, and pleasure, from the earliest accounts of Christ's life, to jewel-encrusted books painted with gold for emperors, to student-copied textbooks of the oldest universities, to vernacular literature, legends, and histories. Topics include technology and materials, integration of text and image, makers (monastic, courtly, and commercial), and readers and collectors, via first-hand study of manuscripts in nearby collections and independent research.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. Andrews

ARTH-301DE Topics in Art History: 'Destroying Art Past and Present'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will investigate the destruction of artworks and monuments for religious or political reasons, called iconoclasm. The seminar addresses the current debates involving the removal and destruction of confederate monuments in the U.S. and responses from government, media, and social critics. Concurrently, we will study key historical moments of iconoclasm ranging from the Byzantine era to the Protestant Reformation and the French Revolution. Studying iconoclasms in different historical periods raises the issue of the power of art in society. Through class discussion, group work, original research, and writing, we will explore how past iconoclasms may inform our understanding of the present. The work also involves an inquiry into art historical methodology as well as approaches from fields such as critical race theory, and a consideration of the role of the art historian in the present debates and social justice movements.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331DE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Andrews

ARTH-301MH Topics in Art History: 'Making History'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Description: This research seminar looks at the relationship between historical painting and the history it depicts. How much is fact; how much is fiction; and how do we explain the differences? To what ends was it painted? The focus will be on contemporary history painting in the period 1770-1875. The first half of the semester will examine these questions using critical theory and real examples. Students will then develop a major American, British, or French history painting for sustained research and analysis. Possible pictures include Turner's Slave Ship, Gericault's Raft of the Medusa, Copley's Watson and the Shark, David's Marat, and others. Numerous papers and class presentations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Art History.
Advisory: A course in American or modern art is recommended.
Notes: Four class presentations, four short papers, and one term paper.

ARTH-301MU Topics in Art History: 'Anthropology in/of Museums'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is a museum, and how is it relevant to all of our lives? This course considers "the museum" as an object of ethnographic inquiry, examining it as a cultural institution perpetually under negotiation and reconfiguration. We reflect on how museum principles of classification, practices of collection and exhibition, and the uptake of digital technologies are central to what and how we know. We investigate and analyze museums as social actors in anthropological debates on power, representation, materiality, value, authenticity, state-making, Indigenous sovereignty, and the preservation and activation of contemporary cultures. The museum is never simply a repository of artifacts, artworks, histories, or scientific inventions, but also a site of tremendous creativity and a field of complex social relations.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-316MU
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in Anthropology and Art History.
Advisory: Students enrolled in or considering the Nexus in Museums, Archives, and Public History are encouraged to take this course

ARTH-302 Great Cities

ARTH-302PA Great Cities: 'Reimagining Paris'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar studies medieval Paris, the largest city in Europe, royal capital of France, and home to a renowned university. We meet the city through its surviving buildings, visual arts, and literature. Using digital tools we will reconstruct key lost buildings in a process that casts participants in the role of builder, demands careful evaluation of evidence and encourages creative imagination.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Davis
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Art History, Computer Science, or Medieval Studies.

ARTH-302RM Great Cities: 'Rome, the Eternal City'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will survey the past, present, and future of the Eternal City through its remarkable art, architecture, and urbanism. We will examine the material traces of Rome's journey from ancient capital to center of Christianity, seat of the caesars to that of the popes and prime ministers, beacon to pilgrims and tourists, then finally modern capital and -- perhaps -- sustainable city. Despite its problems, this "mother of all cities" continues to be a model of urban relevance and staying power.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Maier
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Art History, Classics, or History.

ARTH-310 Seminar in Ancient Art

ARTH-310AP Seminar in Ancient Art: 'Art, Politics, and the Past'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The seminar considers controversies about monuments and objects. We will examine looting from the Roman empire to the present; the destruction of archaeological sites by the Taliban and ISIL; and debates about public statues in the U.S. How do museums define cultural identity? Does the custodial universalism of prestigious institutions, such as the British Museum, legitimate a country's rights to own and exhibit the world's heritage? We will discuss the illicit trafficking of unprovenanced antiquities, how collecting contributes to the destruction of archaeological context, and the impacts of development and tourism on sites and monuments.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Bergmann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in art history.

ARTH-310BA Seminar in Ancient Art: 'The Body in Classical Art'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course interrogates the representation of human, divine, and "other" bodies in Classical art. Through the body, we will engage with questions regarding the roles and perceptions of divinities, humans, and "others" in visual culture from both the ancient and contemporary world. We will also unpack ancient attitudes and expectations of males and females, human and the divine, citizens and "others", and engage with questions of ancient perceptions of beauty, masculinity and femininity, and social and sexual normativity and deviation. Through the investigation of the ancient world and a critical engagement with contemporary America, students will develop a deeper appreciation for how representations of the body can communicate essential cultural information for both the past and the present.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Feldman
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in art history.

ARTH-310CA Seminar in Ancient Art: 'Collecting Global Antiquity'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The seminar considers the collecting and display of ancient objects from antiquity to the present. We will look at current and past controversies about excavation, plunder, and cultural patrimony. Students will engage in firsthand study of objects. A focus will be an exciting new gift to the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum of ancient artifacts from Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Indus Valley, which introduce issues of cross-cultural exchange along the Silk Route.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: Courses in Art History, Classics, or Ancient History.

ARTH-310GA Seminar in Ancient Art: 'Designing a Global Gallery of Ancient Art'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The goal of the seminar is to redesign the Ancient Gallery in the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum to present a more global selection of artifacts and themes of cross-cultural exchange. Students will engage in firsthand study of ancient artifacts from Greece, Rome, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and China. In the process, we consider the collecting and display of ancient objects from antiquity to the present and current and past controversies about excavation, plunder, and cultural patrimony.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: Courses in Art History, Classics, Ancient History, or Asian History.

ARTH-310LM Seminar in Ancient Art: 'Love and Metamorphosis: Storytelling in Greek and Roman Art'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course examines the most popular mythical love tales in Greek and Roman art and compares them with narratives in literature and in (records of) performance. The aim is to acquaint students with visual modes of storytelling and with the major media of Greek and Roman art. In which contexts did such stories appear, why, and what do we know about their reception among ancient viewers? How were such stories interpreted by later artists, in particular those of the Renaissance and Baroque periods? Do they find parallels in non-Western cultures?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: Courses in Art History, Classics, or Ancient History.

ARTH-332 Seminar in Renaissance and Baroque Art

ARTH-340 Seminar in Modern Art

ARTH-340AM Seminar in Modern Art: 'After Impressionism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on the works of four painters, and we will choose from among the following: Bonnard, Cezanne, Gauguin, Pissarro, Seurat, Toulouse-Lautrec, and van Gogh. We will study their works in relation to the feverish debates about painting in the 1880s and 1890s that the previous generation's Impressionism brought about. As we will discover, the four artists were hardly a unified group, took distinct paths away from Impressionism, and pursued projects that had limited allegiance to its main tenets or, indeed, to the ideas and practices of each other. In all, they will represent the extraordinary vitality of art suddenly loosened from the academic world.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Lee
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in art history.

ARTH-342 Seminar in Contemporary Art

ARTH-350 Seminar in American Art

ARTH-360 Seminar in Asian Art

ARTH-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARTST-120 Drawing I

ARTST-120FR Drawing I: 'Form, Structure, and Space'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This intensive drawing course will challenge students' assumptions about the world around them. The course will begin from the beginning, using an embodied connection to the tools of drawing to explore foundational elements of space, line, plane, surface, and tone. This course is grounded in hands-on methods where students will work with a variety of drawing media to tap into both the analytic and expressive capacities of the medium.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Bouton, L. Iglesias, A. Maciuba
Advisory: No previous studio experience required. A student may take only one ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: In ARTST-120FR-01, students will be asked to draw from nude models. In ARTST-120FR-02, students will NOT be asked to draw extensively from nude models. Along with ARTST-116 and ARTST-131, this 120 course will function as a prerequisite course for 200-level studio art courses. Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

ARTST-131 Studio Art Foundations

ARTST-131SE Studio Art Foundations: 'Seeing, Making, and Being'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This hands-on interdisciplinary introduction to the tools and practices of 2D, 3D, and 4D art will include drawing, object making, and time-based exploration. Studio work is grounded in an embodied approach to process, and explores the relationship between perception and cognition. The course culminates with a final project which links conceptual exploration and personal expression to formal skill-building. Studio assignments will be supplemented with critiques, discussion, and collaboration, as well as study of relevant contemporary and historical artists.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Siepel
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Advisory: No previous studio experience is required. A student may take only one ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Along with ARTST-116 and ARTST-120, this 131 course will function as a prerequisite course for 200-level studio art courses. Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

ARTST-137 Topics in Studio Art

ARTST-220 Drawing II

Further exploration and investigation into the techniques and conceptual issues of drawing. The human figure is used as a departure point for developing perceptual skills and personal expression.

ARTST-220DT Drawing II: 'Drawing As Thinking'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Artists, engineers, scientists, and other visionaries have always used drawing as a language of thought. Drawing can document the present or envision the future, it can be a tool for problem solving, a mode of expression, and an experimental art form. In this course, we will dig deeply into visual perception and markmaking through observational drawing, further training our eyes and hands. We will explore experimental practices, including mapping, diagramming, emergent forms, and three-dimensional "expanded field" drawings. Multiple media will be used, and coursework will involve a research component.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Siepel
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students will be asked to draw extensively from nude models in this course. Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of materials.

ARTST-220HF Drawing II: 'The Human Figure and Other Natural Forms'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this intensive drawing class, we will undertake an in-depth study of the human figure and other natural forms. We will draw extensively from nude figure models, using a variety of techniques and media. The focus will be on developing perceptual skills toward a more refined and complex understanding of the expressive and empathic power of the human body and other forms from nature. We will study human anatomy, and will work to develop an embodied connection to the drawing process. Relevant contemporary and historical artists will be discussed.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Siepel
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students will be asked to intensively draw from nude models in this course.

ARTST-221 Digital Photography I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the basics of photography using digital technologies with emphasis placed on three objectives: first, the acquisition of photographic skills, including composition, digital capture, scanning, Photoshop, and printing; second, an introduction to contexts, such as historical, critical, theoretical, and contemporary movements in photography to advance visual literacy; third, the deepening and expanding of a personal way of seeing. Students will have directed and self-initiated shooting and printing assignments. Slide lectures, readings, and short writing assignments will complement the practical aspects of the course.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Stewart
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students interested in taking this course should possess a digital SLR or an advanced compact camera. Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of materials. Five College students require permission of instructor to enroll.

ARTST-226 Topics in Studio Art

Topics courses are offered each semester which are outside the realm of the usual course offerings, focusing on contemporary issues.

ARTST-226DF Topics in Studio Art: 'Costume Design for Stage and Film'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the history, art, and techniques of designing costumes for stage and narrative film. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how the designer's work supports the actors' and the director's vision and how it illuminates a production for the audience. Students will have the opportunity to develop their visual imaginations through the creation of designs for stage and film scripts. They will engage in play analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, drawing, rendering, and other related techniques and methodologies.

Crosslisted as: FMT-240DF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Advisory: Some drawing and painting skills along with an interest in costume history are recommended but not required.

ARTST-226DH Topics in Studio Art: 'Print/Digital Hybrid'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will explore how to integrate digital processes with traditional printmaking techniques. Students will learn the basics of Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, and develop and create imagery through those programs. They will then use digital devices such as laser cutter, router and plotter to turn a digital file into a physical printing block. The final art form will be hand-printed work, utilizing relief printing, engraving on wood, collographs, and monoprinting. This course also covers print-based digital animation.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Maciuba
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. Five College students require permission of instructor to enroll.

ARTST-226PD Topics in Studio Art: 'Portable Printmaking and 2D Design'

Spring. Credits: 4

This class is designed to give the beginning student an overview of basic printmaking techniques and an understanding of what a print is, its form in both unique and multiple formats, and how these techniques function in our culture. The focus of this course will be on developing methods students can take with them when they graduate, whether or not they have access to a traditional studio space and equipment, using nontoxic, water-based materials. Projects will emphasize principles of two-dimensional design and composition, including layout, typography, and color theory, using printmaking techniques like stenciling and relief, as well as digital design software.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Maciuba
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. For art studio majors only for the first week of pre-registration. Then open to all in the second week.

ARTST-236 Painting I

Fall. Credits: 4

Painting I is an introduction to the fundamentals of the discipline and practice of acrylic painting. We will investigate both historical and contemporary strategies of painting and engage in observational and imaginative uses of materials and subject matter. This course promotes and includes a wide variety of opportunities to enhance our educational experience including guest artists, an emphasis on sketchbook habits and critique skills, writing exercises, material experiments, and student presentations on contemporary painters. We will undergo a deep study of lights and darks, color, paint application and composition as we develop distinct visual languages of painting.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Iglesias
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. For art studio majors only for the first week of pre-registration. Then open to all in the second week.

ARTST-237 Painting II

ARTST-237DV Painting II: 'Development and Exploration'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Through a series of increasingly complex color, spatial, and compositional problems, this course consolidates and builds upon the principles and techniques studied in Painting I. Students use these skills to establish their own lines of inquiry, and to explore the formal and conceptual issues that arise from them. To this end, course assignments require increasing degrees of self-direction as the semester progresses, and material and technical experimentation is encouraged. Group critiques play an important role in helping each student formulate her own concerns and ways of working. Subjects include still life, interiors, landscapes, and figures.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131, and ARTST-236.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of materials.

ARTST-246 Sculpture I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In Sculpture I, demonstrations and introductory projects will familiarize students with the tools and processes used to form and manipulate materials such as wood, metal, plaster, paper, wax, and glass. Students will also be asked to explore the potential of combining new technologies in media and fabrication with traditional approaches into immersive sculptural experiences. Each project will present students with a series of conceptual problems to solve. In this way, art-making is positioned as a process of finding individual and independent solutions to three-dimensional problems.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Bouton
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. Five College students require permission of instructor to enroll.

ARTST-263 Topics in Paper and Book Arts

ARTST-263ZP Topics in Studio Art: 'Zines, Prints & Ephemera'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of traditional bookbinding, contemporary artists' books and digital book design. A variety of book structures and skills will be demonstrated, discussed and used throughout the semester. Students will develop a basic understanding of what an artist's book is, where it fits in contemporary art practice as well as its historical context. This course will focus on both editioned and one-of-a-kind zines and ephemera for exchange and intervention throughout campus.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Maciuba
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. Five College students require permission of instructor to enroll.

ARTST-266 Body and Space

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on the issues surrounding body and space through installation, performance, and public arts. Students explore the possibilities of body as an energetic instrument, while investigating the connotations of various spaces as visual vocabulary. The self becomes the reservoir for expression. The course examines the transformational qualities of the body as the conduit that links conceptual and physical properties of materials and ideas.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204BD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Hachiyanagi
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: No previous studio experience required.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

ARTST-267 Papermaking with Local Plants

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students collect usable local plants. They examine and record them before and after drying, then cook and crush them to make paper pulp. As they learn how to process those plants, they study how their methods directly connect to papermaking techniques in various indigenous cultures, especially in Africa, the Pacific, Latin America & Asia. Students conceive and construct their art projects inspired by historical/cultural/biological/ecological/personal aspects of plants as well as their physical qualities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hachiyanagi
Prereq: At least one 200-level studio art course.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. Five College students require instructor's permission for this course. Email the professor with a list of all the studio courses previously taken.

ARTST-269 Japanese Papermaking and Aesthetics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, students learn traditional practice and history of Japanese hand papermaking, while exploring contemporary applications of the method. Thin, translucent, resilient paper is great for drawing and printmaking, as well as for sculptural construction and paper casting. This fluidity of medium naturally encourages students to become interdisciplinary in their art making. The apparent fragility, structural strength, and surprising longevity of the material will be grounds for philosophical investigations into the nature of creativity. Students learn and write about Japanese history, culture, traditional art, and unique aesthetics, as well as about paper.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Prereq: At least one 200-level studio art course.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. Five College students require instructor's permission for this course. Email the professor with a list of all the studio courses previously taken.

ARTST-280 Topics in Studio Art

Topics courses are offered each semester which are outside the realm of the usual course offerings, focusing on contemporary issues.

ARTST-280EA Topics in Studio Art: 'Art and Environment'

Spring. Credits: 4

What does it mean to be an artist in a time of global environmental crisis? How can art connect social, racial, and environmental justice frameworks? How can art foster a sense of kinship between humans, land, water, and non-human organisms? In this class, we'll conduct interdisciplinary, project-based inquiry exploring themes of place, materiality, reciprocity, and advocacy, as they relate to environmental concerns. Students will create independent artworks in conversation with the class community and instructor. Traditional and non-traditional materials and approaches are welcome, and time-based, site-specific, and process-oriented methodologies will be explored. Research and reading on environmental topics as well as relevant artists and art histories will be emphasized alongside studio-based inquiry.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Siepel
Prereq: At least one 200-level studio art course.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

ARTST-280EP Topics in Studio Art: 'Experimental Painting'

Spring. Credits: 4

Through a studio-based, interdisciplinary approach, this course explores diverse methods and practices within contemporary painting. We will discuss both traditional and experimental definitions of painting and exercise connections between painting and other disciplines, including performance and sculpture. Topics include painting as a byproduct of movement, unconventional materials in abstraction, and creative responses to current events. Upon completion of this course, students will gain a broad understanding of contemporary painting, build a distinct visual vocabulary, and develop an interdisciplinary mindset in thinking about what a painting is and can be.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Iglesias
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. For art studio majors only for the first week of pre-registration. Then open to all in the second week.

ARTST-280PS Topics in Studio Art: 'Post-Studio Sculpture'

Fall. Credits: 4

Since the 1970s, artists have been exploring ways to leave their studios in order to engage in the act of making art directly in the world. Through research, readings, discussions, writing assignments, and creative projects this course will investigate the artists and artworks that have moved beyond traditional studio practice to interrupt, intervene, and engage with site, community, and environment. Students will work with a wide range of everyday materials to generate projects that address issues particular to contemporary sculpture while solving a set of conceptual problems.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Bouton
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. For art studio majors only for the first week of pre-registration. Then open to all in the second week.

ARTST-280VN Topics in Studio Art: 'Visual Narrative'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will focus on visual storytelling and will explore how artists have communicated narrative in a multitude of ways throughout history.  The creative assignments will be divided into thematic units including: Myths and Fairytales, Superheroes, Familial Relationships, and Historical Narratives.  Students will be free to tackle these assignments in any medium they feel most appropriately reflects their ideas. Additionally, all students will create a narrative-based sketchbook that will be archived in The Sketchbook Project at the Brooklyn Art Library.  Our critical readings and discussions will focus on contemporary art, film, and media as well as comic books and literature.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Bouton
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials. For art studio majors only for the first week of pre-registration. Then open to all in the second week.

ARTST-280VP Topics in Studio Art: 'Video, Performance, Object'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will explore how history, culture, and our ever-increasing access to technology has influenced the development of video as a medium in contemporary art. Lectures and readings will introduce artists who work in video, sound, performance, installation, surveillance, live streaming, and YouTube. The course will include workshops and demonstrations with digital video cameras, lighting, and sound recording, as well as editing in Adobe Premiere and After Effects. Student projects will focus on time, duration, memory, and identity through single-channel video pieces, as well as installations and the creation of interactive performance objects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
L. Bouton
Prereq: ARTST-120 or ARTST-131.

ARTST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ARTST-330 Junior Studio

Spring. Credits: 4

The primary goal of this course is to provide strategies for each student to develop an individual studio art practice. Through experimentation, thematic development, strong sketchbook skills, and research, students will begin the process of developing and articulating a conceptual focus in their own art production.  Students will be asked to draw on technical skills acquired in 200-level medium-specific courses to create independently generated projects.  Simultaneously, students will be required to reflect clearly upon their work in short writing assignments towards the creation of a coherent artist statement. Our discussions will center on critical texts that help students position their work in larger contemporary art and cultural contexts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Maciuba
Restrictions: This course is limited to juniors only.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: At least four 200-level studio art courses.
Notes: Students will be responsible for some of the cost of materials.

ARTST-390 Advanced Studio

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Concentration on individual artistic development. Emphasis will be placed on experimentation, thematic development, and critical review. Students may elect to take this course more than once.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Iglesias, G. Siepel
Restrictions: This course is limited to Art Studio majors only.
Prereq: At least four 200-level studio art courses.
Notes: Students will be responsible for some of the cost of materials. MHC studio art majors only. Minors require permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

ARTST-392 Five College Advanced Studio Seminar

ARTST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Senior studio majors may elect to become candidates for an honors thesis with approval of the studio faculty. Students enrolled in all studio courses will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

ARTST-395SS Senior Studio

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

L. Iglesias, G. Siepel
Restrictions: Limited to Mount Holyoke Art Studio majors in their senior year
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Students will be responsible for some of the cost of materials. MHC studio art majors only. Minors require permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit.

ASIAN-110 First Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 6

ASIAN-110 is the first semester of the first-year Chinese course. This is an intensive course emphasizing the rapid development of listening and speaking ability and intended for students with no or very little prior knowledge of Mandarin Chinese. Points of focus include pronunciation and tones, basic syntax, high-frequency vocabulary words, conversational flow, and an introduction to reading and writing Chinese characters. Relevant cultural knowledge and activities will be incorporated into the curriculum. The class will initially be conducted in both English and Chinese, with the proportion of Chinese steadily increasing over the first two months, after which the great majority of instruction will be in Chinese. Learning is supplemented by online learning resources, out-of-class language partner sessions, Language Resource Center Question and Answer sessions and the Chinese Language Table.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao, L. Xu
Advisory: Students with previous or equivalent language study should contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-111 First Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 110, First Year Chinese I, with an introduction to Mandarin Chinese and the development of oral proficiency as well as gradual acquisition of reading and writing skills. Learning is supplemented by online learning resources, out-of-class language partner sessions, Language Resource Center Question and Answer sessions and the Chinese Language Table.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
S. Kao, L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-110 or equivalent.
Advisory: Students with previous or equivalent language study should contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-120 First Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 6

Introduces listening, speaking, reading, and writing modern Japanese; hiragana, katakana, and approximately 50 Kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang, N. Nemoto
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years, sophomores, and juniors
Advisory: Only first-year, sophomores, and juniors may pre-register; if space is available, seniors may be able to register during Add/Drop; students with previous training in Japanese should contact Naoko Nemoto (nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-121 First Year Japanese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This continues Asian Studies 120, First Year Japanese I. Introduces listening, speaking, reading, and writing modern Japanese; hiragana, katakana, and approximately 150 Kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang, N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-120 or equivalent.
Advisory: Students with previous training in Japanese outside of MHC should contact Naoko Nemoto, nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-130 First Year Arabic I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces the basics of Modern Standard Arabic and one dialect. It begins with a study of the Arabic script and sounds using the Alif Baa textbook, and then students will use Al-Kitaab I, 3rd edition (chapters 1-5). Students will acquire vocabulary and usage for everyday interactions in Arabic. In addition to the traditional textbook exercises, students will write short paragraphs, and participate in role plays and conversations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Advisory: Students with previous language study should contact Heba Arafah (harafah@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-131 First Year Arabic II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of ASIAN-130, First Year Arabic I. It covers chapters 6-13 of Al-Kitaab I, 3rd edition, with a focus on improving students' speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will expand their vocabulary and learn to read and analyze a range of authentic texts to engage with Arab cultures. In addition, they will write short essays, and participate in role plays, debates, and conversations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Prereq: ASIAN-130 or equivalent.

ASIAN-160 First Year Korean I

Fall. Credits: 4

First Year Korean I is the first half of elementary Korean. It is designed to provide students who have little or no knowledge of Korean with basic proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how these can be used in context.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Advisory: Students with previous training in Korean should contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-161 First Year Korean II

Spring. Credits: 4

First Year Korean II is the second half of elementary Korean. It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in First Year Korean I and to continue developing students' proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will continue to cover the foundations of Korean vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation and how ethese can be used in context. Students will also develop their ability to communicate about topics related to everyday events and situations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Prereq: ASIAN-160 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-211 Topics in Asian Studies

ASIAN-212 Second Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 6

Asian 212 is the first semester of the second-year Chinese course. This is an intensive course to consolidate and expand students' competencies in the four fundamental areas of language learning--speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will improve their oral fluency, study more complex grammatical structures, and enlarge their vocabulary. Emphasis on facilitating daily-life interactions will be supplemented and expanded by increasing discussion of broader issues in society. Students will develop a deeper and broader understanding of relevant aspects of Chinese culture. This course is conducted mostly in Chinese. Learning is supplemented by online learning resources, out-of-class language partner sessions, Language Resource Center Question and Answer sessions and the Chinese Language Table.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Y. Wang
Prereq: ASIAN-111 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-213 Second Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 212, Second Year Chinese I. A continuing emphasis on the facility in daily life interactions will be supplemented and expanded by increasing discussion of broader issues in society, including education, employment, etc.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao, L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-212 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-214 Philosophical Foundations of Chinese Thought: the Ancient Period

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to Chinese thought during the Eastern Zhou Dynasty (roughly 770-256 BCE), a time of remarkable philosophical growth and controversy. We read the works of this era's most influential philosophers, including: Kongzi (Confucius), Mozi, Laozi, Mengzi (Mencius), Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and Han Feizi. Topics discussed include: What makes for a just ruler? What kind of life should we live? What is our relationship to nature? We work to understand each philosopher's responses to these questions, but we also learn to develop our own answers. We take care to place these figures and their works in their historical and cultural context.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-212
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Harold

ASIAN-215 Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204CW, FMT-230CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English

ASIAN-222 Second Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 6

This course emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Japanese. Includes approximately 250 kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang
Prereq: ASIAN-121 or equivalent.
Advisory: Asian Studies 121 or equivalent. Students with previous training in Japanese outside of MHC should consult Naoko Nemoto (nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-223 Second Year Japanese II

Spring. Credits: 6

This course continues Asian Studies 222, Second Year Japanese I. Emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, and writing modern Japanese. Includes approximately 350 kanji. Supplements class work with audio and video.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
J. Chang
Prereq: ASIAN-222 or equivalent.
Advisory: Students with previous training in Japanese outside of MHC should consult Naoko Nemoto (nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-229 Analyzing Japanese: Intro to Linguistics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces basic linguistics methodologies to analyze the Japanese language. These methodologies include phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. We will introduce them by comparing Japanese to English and other languages.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-120.

ASIAN-232 Second Year Arabic I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is the continuation of ASIAN-131, First Year Arabic II. Students will further their knowledge of Arabic, focusing on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio, and websites. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. Students will use Al Kitaab, Book 2 (3rd edition), completing Chapter 4 by the end of the semester.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Prereq: ASIAN-131.
Advisory: Asian Studies 131 or equivalent. Contact Heba Arafah (harafah@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-233 Second Year Arabic II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is the continuation of ASIAN-232, Second Year Arabic I. Students will further their knowledge of Arabic, focusing on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students should expect text assignments as well as work with DVDs, audio, and websites. Exercises include writing, social interactions, role plays, and the interplay of language and culture. Students will continue using Georgetown Textbook Al Kitaab, Book 2, 3rd edition.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
H. Arafah
Prereq: ASIAN-232 or equivalent.

ASIAN-247 Chinese Women Writers in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In the last hundred years, China witnessed the emergence of many talented Chinese women writers. Not only did they take part in every stage of important socio-political changes in modern and contemporary China, they were and still are the avant-garde of literary reform and innovation. Many of their works, in particular, take gender and gender ideology/politics at issue, while deviating from the traditional discourse that marginalized or trivialized women, exploring creative and effective ways of literary dialogue and imagination. This course will cover women writers from both modern (1911-1949) and contemporary (1949-present) times. Some of the representative women writers include: Ding Ling, Xiao Hong, Zhang Ailing, Zong Pu, Yang Jiang, Wang Anyi, Tie Ning, etc.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English. This class may be especially suitable for students who do not identify as native speakers of English.

ASIAN-248 Contemporary Chinese Fiction: From 1949 to the Present

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A study of representative Chinese fictional writings from 1949 to the present focusing on the ways in which issues of individual and national identity, modernity, and gender have been probed and represented by different generations of Chinese writers. A particular emphasis will be placed on the novels and short stories published since the 1980s, in which both traditional ideology and literary styles are seriously questioned and challenged. Readings include works by Nobel Prize winners Gao Xingjian, Mo Yan and other famous writers, such as Zhang Xianliang, Zhang Jie, Wang Anyi, Yu Hua, Su Tong, Han Shaogong,etc.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English. All readings are also English translations of Chinese fictional works.

ASIAN-262 Second Year Korean I

Fall. Credits: 4

Second Year Korean I is the first half of intermediate Korean. It is designed to provide students with intermediate proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. The course will strengthen students' communicative skills on familiar topics related to everyday events and situations. Students will also develop discourse/pragmatic competence in various social contexts of communication.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Prereq: ASIAN-161 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-263 Second Year Korean II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is the second half of intermediate Korean. It is designed to consolidate and solidify the language skills acquired in ASIAN-262, Second Year Korean I, and to continue developing proficiency in Korean speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
K. Park
Prereq: ASIAN-262 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Kyae-Sung Park for placement.

ASIAN-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ASIAN-310 Third Year Chinese I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course helps students to build linguistic and communicative competence in Mandarin Chinese through reading, discussing, and writing about authentic texts. Newspapers, essays, and short stories will be the teaching materials for the course. An interactive approach will be incorporated into the curriculum to improve students' conversational skills. The class will be conducted mostly in Chinese, and class hours will be supplemented by individual work in the Language Resource Center.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao
Prereq: ASIAN-213 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-311 Third Year Chinese II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course continues Asian Studies 310, Third Year Chinese I, in helping students build linguistic and communicative competence in Mandarin Chinese through reading, discussing, and writing about authentic texts. Newspapers, essays, and short stories will be the teaching materials for the course. An interactive approach will be incorporated into the curriculum to improve students' conversational skills. The class will be conducted mostly in Chinese, and class hours will be supplemented by individual work in the Language Resource Center.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Kao
Prereq: ASIAN-310 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-312 Newspaper Reading and Journalistic Practice in China

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course advances students' Chinese reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills by studying journalistic reports on the most pressing issues in China and the U.S. It also introduces the formal expressions, writing styles, and terminology commonly used in Chinese media. In addition, the course intends to help familiarize students with various media channels and agencies, understand the challenges of journalistic practice in the internet age, and enhance students' critical thinking and analytical stills by broadening their perspective and comparing Chinese and English media sources. Conducted mainly in Chinese with the addition of relevant English materials.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-313 Advanced Chinese Reading

ASIAN-313SH Advanced Chinese Reading: 'Reading Chinese Classics: 17th Century Short Stories'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

In 17th-century China, an effort arose that challenged Neo-Confucian moral values and legitimized human desire. This trend is best reflected in the fictional writings of Feng Menglong, Ling Mengchu, and Li Yu. Daring and earthy, their stories deal with many aspects of mundane life in urbanized communities, portraying social customs with local colors. Under these writers' pen, individual struggles for survival, love, and sexual desire coexist with social vicissitudes caused by war, famine, and politics. This course intends to help students better understand the urban life and human relations of 17th-century China and gain knowledge about the huaben genre and its influence on later pre-modern fictional writings. Course works include readings and writings in Chinese, and translation from Chinese to English.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Xu
Prereq: ASIAN-312, ASIAN-314, or ASIAN-315. Native Chinese speakers who have taken a 100- or 200-level course on China, contact instructor for permission.
Notes: Taught in Chinese

ASIAN-314 Learning Chinese Through Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will improve students' four communication skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) by studying contemporary Chinese films, including several prize winners/nominees by internationally acclaimed directors such as Zhang Yimou, Li An, and Chen Kaige. The class will watch the films and then use the synopses and selected dialogues from the scripts as reading materials to facilitate both linguistic and cultural learning. Social and cultural issues reflected in the films will be discussed. The class will be conducted mainly in Chinese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-315 Business Culture and Communication in China

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An advanced speaking- and writing-intensive Chinese course focusing on Chinese business communication and culture. Will further improve students' Chinese proficiency and oral communication by using Chinese as a tool to investigate topics in business and business culture in China. As well as the textbook, the course will make use of a variety of supplementary materials, including some in English. Through lectures and other activities, students will gain experience and comfort in reading and discussing business news, producing analytic and technical forms of business writing, translating business-related documents, and other skills for future work in China.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.
Notes: Taught entirely in Chinese.

ASIAN-316 Introduction to Translation Between  Chinese and English

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This is an introductory course on Chinese-English translation. The course develops the student's ability to think deeply about the texts and to produce natural and accurate translation from Chinese to English and vice versa. Both oral and written translation skills are emphasized; students will conduct translations at different linguistic levels, from expressions to sentences to discourses. The class materials include Metaphors and idioms, economic text, news and reportage, business, governmental, legal documents, film subtitles, fiction, song, and poetry.Students will be assigned a real translation project at the end of the course. Technology will be used to assist learning and publishing of translated texts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ASIAN-311 or equivalent.
Advisory: Contact Lisha Xu, lxu@mtholyoke.edu, for placement.

ASIAN-324 Third Year Japanese I

Fall. Credits: 4

This course helps students attain a higher level of proficiency in modern Japanese through the extended use of the language in practical contexts. The class will be conducted mostly in Japanese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-223 or equivalent.
Advisory: Asian Studies 223 or equivalent. Students with previous training in Japanese outside of MHC should consult Naoko Nemoto (nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-326 Third Year Japanese II

Spring. Credits: 4

This course continues Asian Studies 324, Third Year Japanese I. Emphasizes attaining a higher level of proficiency in modern Japanese through the extended use of the language in practical contexts. The class will be conducted mostly in Japanese.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
N. Nemoto
Prereq: ASIAN-324 or equivalent.
Advisory: Asian Studies 324 or equivalent. Students with previous training in Japanese outside of MHC should consult Naoko Nemoto (nnemoto@mtholyoke.edu) for placement.

ASIAN-339 The Medieval Mirror: Freedom, Gender and Resistance in Contemporary Arabic Literature

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Setting their historical novels in the Middle Ages, contemporary Arab writers such as Radwa Ashour, Jurjy Zaydan, Gamal al-Ghitani and Bensalem Himmich have reflected into the past the problems of present Middle-Eastern societies. Writing from Egypt, Lebanon and Morocco, they revisited with nostalgia the extraordinary medieval heritage of the Arab-Islamic world, educating their readers while taking them on journeys to Medieval Andalusia, to the last years of the Baghdad of the caliphs, and to Cairo on eve of the Ottoman conquest. By looking into the medieval mirror, these authors challenged conservative readings of this heritage. In doing so, they contributed to the modernization of their countries and were able to escape censorship, uphold feminist values, and to criticize Western imperialism and oppressive Arab rulers. In this course, we will read their works in valuable English translations, while discussing their extraordinary lives as twentieth-century writers, intellectuals, and activists.

Crosslisted as: CST-349MR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Lovato
Notes: Taught in English. A special Arabic track will be available for upper-intermediate, advanced, and native students of Arabic.

ASIAN-340 Love, Gender-Crossing, and Women's Supremacy: A Reading of The Story of the Stone

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A seminar on the eighteenth-century Chinese masterpiece The Story of the Stone and selected literary criticism in response to this work. Discussions will focus on love, gender-crossing, and women's supremacy and the paradoxical treatments of these themes in the novel. We will explore multiple aspects of these themes, including the sociological, philosophical, and literary milieus of eighteenth-century China. We will also examine this novel in its relation to Chinese literary tradition in general and the generic conventions of pre-modern Chinese vernacular fiction in particular.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333HH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
Y. Wang
Advisory: Intended for East Asian Studies majors and Asian Studies minors.
Notes: Taught in English.

ASIAN-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ASTR-100 Stars and Galaxies

Fall. Credits: 4

Discover how the forces of nature shape our understanding of the cosmos. Explore the origin, structure, and evolution of the earth, moons and planets, comets and asteroids, the sun and other stars, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the universe as a whole.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young

ASTR-102 Solar Systems

Spring. Credits: 4

Travel through our solar system using results of the latest spacecraft. Explore the origins of our worlds through the study of planet formation, meteorites, asteroids, and comets. Discover the processes that shape planetary interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres. Compare our solar system to others by learning about newly discovered exoplanets. Trace the conditions that may foster life throughout the solar system and beyond.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young

ASTR-105 The Sky

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

A hands-on introduction to observing and understanding the extraterrestrial sky. Daily and annual motions of the sun, moon, planets, and stars; celestial coordinate systems; apparent brightnesses and colors of the stars; time; calendars. Observations at the Williston Observatory with the unaided eye, visually with the eight-inch telescope, and by electronic camera with computer-controlled telescopes.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
T. Burbine

ASTR-223 Planetary Science

Spring. Credits: 4

This intermediate-level course covers fundamentals of spectroscopy, remote sensing, and planetary surfaces. Discussions will include interiors, atmospheres, compositions, origins, and evolution of terrestrial planets; satellites, asteroids, comets, and planetary rings.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
E. McGowan
Prereq: 1 physical science course. MATH-100 or 101 is also suggested but not required as a prerequisite.

ASTR-226 Cosmology

Fall. Credits: 4

Cosmological models and the relationship between models and observable parameters. Topics in current astronomy that bear upon cosmological problems, including background electromagnetic radiation, nucleosynthesis, dating methods, determinations of the mean density of the universe and the Hubble constant, and tests of gravitational theories. Discussion of questions concerning the foundations of cosmology and its future as a science.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young
Prereq: ASTR-100, ASTR-101, ASTR-102, or ASTR-115; one semester of physics; and one semester of calculus at high school or college level.

ASTR-228 Astrophysics I: Stars and Galaxies

Spring. Credits: 4

A calculus-based introduction to the properties, structure, formation, and evolution of stars and galaxies. The laws of gravity, thermal physics, and atomic physics provide a basis for understanding observed properties of stars, interstellar gas, and dust. We apply these concepts to develop an understanding of stellar atmospheres, interiors, and evolution, the interstellar medium, and the Milky Way and other galaxies.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young
Prereq: PHYS-110 and MATH-102.
Advisory: PHYS-201 and MATH-203 strongly suggested.

ASTR-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ASTR-330 Topics in Astrophysics

In-class discussions will be used to formulate a set of problems, each designed to illuminate a significant aspect of the topic at hand. The problems will be difficult and broad in scope: their solutions, worked out individually and in class discussions, will constitute the real work of the course. Students will gain experience in both oral and written presentation. Topics vary from year to year.

ASTR-330AC Topics in Astrophysics: 'Asteroids and Comets'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to asteroids and comets from both an astronomical and geological point of view. Topics that will be covered will include how these objects are discovered, their orbits, the mineralogies of asteroids and meteorites, how these objects are classified, impact hazard scales, and space missions. This course is appropriate for any student interested in the properties of these small bodies.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
T. Burbine

ASTR-330MA Topics in Astrophysics: 'Mars'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will survey the past, present, and future of Mars exploration and science. We will focus on the evolution of Mars as a paradigm for terrestrial planets, with specific units on missions, formation, volcanism, impacts, glaciers and water, spectroscopy and mineralogy, climate, and issues pertaining to the possibilities of life on Mars. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar with students and faculty reading current papers from the literature, supported by many outside speakers. Weekly writing assignments focus on critical thinking.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Dyar
Prereq: Any intermediate-level Astronomy or Geology course.
Advisory: ASTR-223 recommended.

ASTR-330ME Topics in Astrophysics: 'Mercury'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will survey the past, present, and future of the exploration and science of the planet Mercury. We will have specific units on interiors, heat flow, thermal evolution, magnetism, volcanism, impacts, crustal composition and mineralogy, and spectroscopy of its surface. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar with students and faculty reading current papers from the literature.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. McGowan
Prereq: Any intermediate-level Astronomy or Geology course.

ASTR-330MN Topics in Astrophysics: 'Moon'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will survey the past, present, and future of the exploration and science of the Earth's Moon. We will have specific units on interiors, heat flow, thermal evolution, magnetism, volcanism, impacts, crustal composition and mineralogy, and spectroscopy of its surface. This is a discussion-based, interactive seminar with students and faculty reading current papers from the literature.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Dyar
Prereq: Any intermediate-level Astronomy or Geology course.
Advisory: Astronomy 223 recommended.

ASTR-335 Astrophysics II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How do astronomers determine the nature and extent of the universe? Centering around the theme of the "Cosmic Distance Ladder," we explore how astrophysics has expanded our comprehension to encompass the entire universe. Topics include: the size of the solar system; parallactic and spectroscopic distances of stars; star counts and the structure of our galaxy; Cepheid variables and the distances of galaxies; the Hubble Law and large-scale structure in the universe; quasars and the Lyman-Alpha Forest.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young
Prereq: ASTR-228.

ASTR-352 Astrophysics III

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Advanced course covering physical processes in the gaseous interstellar medium, including photoionization in HII regions and planetary nebulae, shocks in supernova remnants and stellar jets, and energy balance in molecular clouds. Dynamics of stellar systems, star clusters, and the viral theorem will also be discussed, along with galaxy rotation and the presence of dark matter in the universe, as well as spiral density waves. The course concludes with quasars and active galactic nuclei, synchrotron radiation, accretion disks, and supermassive black holes.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Young
Prereq: ASTR-335 or two physics courses at the 200 or 300 level.

ASTR-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

BIOCH-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Independent work in biochemistry can be conducted with any member of the biochemistry committee and, upon approval, also with other members of the biological sciences and chemistry departments and program in neuroscience and behavior.

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Students conducting an independent lab research project for credit in a department, program, or lab covered by the College's chemical hygiene plan must participate in a safety training session before beginning research.

BIOCH-311 Protein Biochemistry and Cellular Metabolism

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is a rigorous introduction to the study of protein molecules and their role as catalysts in the cell. Topics include general principles of protein folding, protein structure-function correlation, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, carbohydrate and lipid biochemistry, and metabolic pathways (catabolic and anabolic) and their interaction and cross-regulation. Biological transformation of energy is considered in light of the principles of thermodynamics.

Crosslisted as: BIOL-311, CHEM-311
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOL-230, and CHEM-302, and CHEM-231. Coreq: BIOCH-318.

BIOCH-312 Chemistry of Biomolecules

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

An examination of the major ideas of biochemistry from the point of view of the chemical sciences rather than the life sciences. The focus will be on structure and reactivity of important biomolecules and the role of energetics and reaction dynamics in biochemical processes. Major metabolic pathways are covered, including those of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.

Crosslisted as: CHEM-312
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Prereq: CHEM-202 with a grade of C or better.
Advisory: This course is NOT intended for biochemistry majors, who must take BIOCH-311 and BIOCH-314. BIOCH-312 students may take BIOCH-318 concurrently.

BIOCH-314 Nucleic Acids Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an in-depth examination of DNA and RNA structures and how these structures support their respective functions during replication, transcription, and translation of the genetic material. Emphasis is on the detailed mechanisms associated with each step of gene expression. Discussions incorporate many recent advances brought about by recombinant DNA technology.

Crosslisted as: BIOL-314, CHEM-314
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOCH-311. Coreq: BIOCH-314L.

BIOCH-318 Laboratory Techniques in Protein Biochemistry

Fall. Credits: 1

This course covers fundamental laboratory techniques in protein biochemistry and data analysis. The aims of this course are: 1) to provide students with practical knowledge and hands-on experience with some of the most common experimental methods used in biochemical research, and 2) to develop the skills in written and oral scientific communication. The course focuses on protein overexpression and purification and also includes reagent preparation, proper use of instrumentation, SDS-PAGE gel analysis, enzyme activity assays, protein structure viewing, experimental design and utilizing computers to analyze and present data. Laboratory safety is also emphasized.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Lentz-Marino
Coreq: BIOCH-311 students must co-enroll in this lab course. CHEM-312/BIOCH-312 students may co-enroll.

BIOCH-330 Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

This course each year examines a number of important and exciting topics in biochemistry, molecular biology, and other related fields of biology. The intellectual and research development that formulated these fundamental concepts is traced through extensive readings of the primary literature. Discussions emphasize the critical evaluation of experimental techniques, data analysis, and interpretation. This is a seminar-style course in which students will bear responsibility for the synthesis and presentation of assigned papers; substantial student participation in the form of oral presentation is expected.

BIOCH-330RN Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: 'The RNA World: The Origin of Life to Modern Cells'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

RNA is believed by many to have been the first macromolecule to evolve. In a hypothesized "RNA world," RNA would have simultaneously served the roles of carrying genetic information and catalyzing chemical reactions within early cells. The past three decades have been a renaissance for RNA biology, as researchers have uncovered the critical role RNA plays in eukaryotic and bacterial gene regulation and defense, as well as the potential for RNAs to perform catalysis. This seminar will introduce students to modern approaches to study the structure and function of RNA and will explore the chemical and biological roles RNA plays in modern cells as well as its role in the origin of life.

Crosslisted as: CHEM-330RN
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Berry
Prereq: BIOCH-311, or BIOCH-314, or CHEM-312.

BIOCH-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

Independent work in biochemistry can be conducted with any member of the biochemistry committee and, upon approval, also with other members of the biological sciences and chemistry departments and program in neuroscience and behavior.

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: See safety training restrictions in the course description for Biochemistry 295

BIOL-145 Introductory Biology

BIOL-145AB Introductory Biology: 'Animal Bodies, Animal Functions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How are animal bodies built to deal with living on earth? In this course we will study the function of cells, organs, and organ systems that have evolved to help animals make their way through the physical and chemical environment. In lecture and in lab, we will consider the common needs of animals -- needs such as feeding, breathing, and reproducing -- and the diverse solutions they have devised. A range of life, from unicellular organisms to animals with backbones (including mammals), will be considered.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Bacon
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Coreq: BIOL-145ABL.

BIOL-145BN Introductory Biology: 'Introduction to Biological Inquiry'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course students will explore the biological world from evolution to physiology to cellular dynamics, developing a basic understanding of how knowledge is generated. Laboratory experiences will help students acquire the skills necessary to conduct their own research and understand basic data analysis. Socially relevant science issues will generate discussion on the intersection of science and current events.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Coreq: BIOL-145BNL.

BIOL-145GW Introductory Biology: 'A Green World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the plant life in the woods and fields around us, the exotic plants in our greenhouses, and the plants we depend on for food. We will study plants living in surprising circumstances, settling into winter, escaping from gardens, reclaiming farmland, cooperating with fungi and insects, and fighting for their lives. We will find that plants challenge some conventional, animal-based assumptions about what matters to living things. In labs, students will seek to answer their questions about how plants grow in nature, by studying plant structure and function, ecology, and evolution.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Frary
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: BIOL-145GWL.

BIOL-145HG Introductory Biology: 'Biology in the Genomic Era'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Genome projects are leading to great advances in our understanding of biology and in our ability to manipulate the genetic information of organisms, including humans. We will focus on the science behind genome projects, and the ways in which the resulting knowledge and technology affect our lives. In lab we will examine and analyze a variety of organisms such as microbes, plants and humans. This class will also serve as a general introductory biology course for biology majors as well as non-majors.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
C. Woodard
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: BIOL-145HGL.

BIOL-145RG Introductory Biology: 'Organismal Biology'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course encompasses a broad range of concepts central to our understanding of how organisms function and evolve. We will investigate important biological processes, such as photosynthesis and metabolism, and systems, such as the cardiovascular and immune systems. We will also take a holistic view of biology and use our newly acquired knowledge to explore such diverse topics as: the evolution of infectious diseases, the consequences of development and design on the evolution of organisms, and how the physiology and behavior of animals might affect their responses to global climate change.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
R. Brodie
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: BIOL-145RGL.
Notes: Registration in one of the two corequisite labs is also required.

BIOL-145TR Introductory Biology: 'The Tree of Life'

Fall. Credits: 4

In this course we will consider the biochemical and cellular characteristics that are shared by all living creatures due to our common heritage, as well as the incredible diversity of different forms and functions that evolution has produced. We will then take a closer look at the diversity of life represented among plants and animals, exploring the cellular, anatomical, and physiological systems that have evolved to help organisms live in their physical and chemical environment. In labs, students will seek to answer questions about how organisms survive in nature, by studying their structure and function, ecology, and evolution.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Andras, S. Bacon, A. Frary
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: BIOL-145TRL.

BIOL-160 Integrated Introduction to Biology and Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This 8-credit course serves as a gateway to both the biology and chemistry core curricula. The course introduces and develops fundamental concepts in chemistry while also exploring the diverse range of strategies adopted by living systems to survive in different environments. This course prepares students for further study in chemistry (Chemistry 201) and/or biology (Biology 200). Students must register for both Biology 160 and Chemistry 160 as well as a single lab section (listed under Chemistry 160L). Recommended for students interested in completing pre-health requirements or advanced study in biochemistry or neuroscience.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Andras, K. Broaders
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: CHEM-160 and CHEM-160L.
Notes: Students must co-enroll in Biology 160 and Chemistry 160 for a total of 8 credits; three 50 minute lectures, three 75 minute lectures, and one three-hour laboratory per week.

BIOL-200 Introductory Biology II: How Organisms Develop

Spring. Credits: 4

An overview of cells to tissues to organisms. Cellular components, the role of the nucleus, cell reproduction, and meiosis will be examined as part of our study of gamete production, fertilization, embryology, and development in animals and plants.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
R. Fink, A. Frary
Prereq: BIOL-145 or BIOL-160, or NEURO-100. Coreq: BIOL-200L.

BIOL-203 Teaching Children Science: College Students in the Elementary Classroom

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed for science students with interests in teaching and learning with children. It will focus on research, theory and practice pertinent to science education, linking scientific information gained in college classes to children's learning of scientific phenomena. Weekly class meetings (from 1-3 hours) will include laboratory and off-site field investigations. Each student will also become a 'Science Buddy' at a local elementary school, assisting children with hands-on science experiences for at least 1 hour each week.

Crosslisted as: EDUST-203
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
R. Fink
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: One year of any college science (in any discipline), at least one lab course.

BIOL-206 Local Flora

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers plant identification and natural history, emphasizing native and introduced trees and wildflowers. On- and off-campus field trips.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
A. Frary
Prereq: 4 credits in the department.

BIOL-223 Ecology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This ecology course will cover the fundamental factors controlling the distribution and abundance of organisms, including interactions with the abiotic environment, fitness and natural selection, population growth and dynamics, species interactions, community dynamics, and diversity. We will address variation across space and time. The course will combine observational, experimental, and mathematical approaches to some of the applications of ecological theory, including conservation, disease dynamics, and biological control.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Hoopes
Prereq: BIOL-145 or BIOL-160 and at least one semester of Calculus or Statistics. Coreq: BIOL-223L.
Advisory: Because the course uses quantitative methods, students must have experience with calculus or statistics; high school level courses are sufficient.
Notes: Biology 223 and/or Biology 226 must be taken for the Biology major.

BIOL-226 Evolution: Making Sense of Life

Spring. Credits: 4

Evolution is central to our understanding of Biology; it helps us explain both the diversity and commonality in organismal form, function and behavior that have been generated over 3 billion years of life on Earth. We will discuss the mechanisms of evolution within populations and between species, examine some branches of the tree of life and learn how the tree is generated, discuss how phenotypes arise from genotypes and interactions with the environment, and how development is central to understanding evolution. Some themes include the evolution of symbiosis, sex, and human evolution, as well as the crucial role that evolutionary principles play in society including agriculture, medicine, and even the judicial system.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Andras, P. Brennan
Prereq: BIOL-200 or BIOL-223 or BIOL-230.

BIOL-230 Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology

Fall. Credits: 4

Cells are the smallest common denominator of life: the simplest organisms are single cells, while others like ourselves are composed of vast communities of cells. In this course, we will learn how cellular structure and function is orchestrated by biological molecules, most notably the genome and the proteins it encodes. Topics will include genetic inheritance, gene and protein regulation, cellular processes including transport, energy capture, and signaling, the cellular and molecular basis for disease, and modern techniques including genomics, bioinformatics, and microscopy. The laboratory component will illustrate and analyze these topics through selected experimental approaches.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Camp, C. Woodard
Prereq: BIOL-200, and CHEM-150 or CHEM-160 Coreq: BIOL-230L.

BIOL-234 Biostatistics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The statistics sections of biology articles have become so technical and jargon-filled that many biologists feel intimidated into skipping them or blindly accepting the stated results. But how can we ask relevant questions or push the boundaries of knowledge if we skip these sections? Using lectures, data collection, and hands-on analysis in R, this course will connect statistics to biology to help students develop a gut instinct for experimental design and analysis. We will explore sampling bias and data visualization and review methods and assumptions for the most common approaches with examples from current biological literature and our own data.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Hoopes
Prereq: 8 credits in biological sciences or ENVST-200. Coreq: BIOL-234L.

BIOL-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

In this class, students will acquire hands-on experience in diverse aspects of the research process in any field of Biology, from familiarizing themselves with a research topic, generating interesting questions, designing experiments, acquiring technical skills, collecting and analyzing data, to writing and/or presenting their results. To inquire about enrollment, students should approach a Biological Sciences faculty member to identify mutual areas of interest. Typically, these conversations should occur well before registration, and the decision by the faculty member will depend on lab capacity. A single credit requires an average of 3 hrs of work per week. (Note: Some faculty may require a set weekly meeting time for a portion of this class.)

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Note: Any student conducting an independent laboratory research project for course credit in a department, program, or laboratory covered by the College's chemical hygiene plan must participate in a safety training session before beginning research.

BIOL-301 Regenerative Medicine: Biology and Bioethics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What is regenerative medicine? What is the science that drives new medical therapies using stem cells? We will study the biology of adult, embryonic, and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as the legal, ethical, and moral implications of using these cells in medical therapies. Each member of the class will participate in a staged debate on these issues for an introductory biology class.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Fink
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: BIOL-230 and instructor permission.

BIOL-305 Cellular and Molecular Aspects of Development

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Examines the roles of cellular movement and cellular interaction in the development of multicellular organisms. Topics include cell recognition and adhesion during morphogenesis, the importance of extracellular matrices, and current theories of embryonic pattern formation. Self-designed laboratories include techniques such as microsurgery and time-lapse recording, using a wide variety of embryos and cell types.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Fink
Prereq: BIOL-200 and BIOL-230. Coreq: BIOL-305L.

BIOL-307 Vertebrate Anatomy

Fall. Credits: 4

We will study the structure, function and evolution of the diversity of structures that allow vertebrates, including humans, to perform basic functions. We will connect these functions with day-to-day challenges for vertebrates, and we will discuss functional disruption such as disease and trauma. Students are expected to work in groups, as well as view the lectures before class. Class time will be used for active discussion and occasional guest lectures. During lab time, we will use virtual software to examine the morphology of all organ systems in humans and compare this anatomy to that of other vertebrates, and we will get together virtually to clarify points of confusion. Please note that we will not be dissecting cats this semester, but we may be able to do some practicums with smaller animals depending on health and safety. This class requires memorization of many structures in a functional context.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
P. Brennan
Prereq: BIOL-220, BIOL-230, or BIOL-226. Coreq: BIOL-307L.

BIOL-311 Protein Biochemistry and Cellular Metabolism

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is a rigorous introduction to the study of protein molecules and their role as catalysts in the cell. Topics include general principles of protein folding, protein structure-function correlation, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, carbohydrate and lipid biochemistry, and metabolic pathways (catabolic and anabolic) and their interaction and cross-regulation. Biological transformation of energy is considered in light of the principles of thermodynamics.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-311, CHEM-311
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOL-230, and CHEM-302 and CHEM-231.

BIOL-314 Nucleic Acids Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an in-depth examination of DNA and RNA structures and how these structures support their respective functions during replication, transcription, and translation of the genetic material. Emphasis is on the detailed mechanisms associated with each step of gene expression. Discussions incorporate many recent advances brought about by recombinant DNA technology.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-314, CHEM-314
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOCH-311. Coreq: BIOL-314L.
Advisory: CHEM-302 can be taken concurrently
Notes: Please sign up for this course as BIOCH-314

BIOL-315 Behavioral Ecology

Fall. Credits: 4

In this course, students learn to view and understand animal behavior within an evolutionary context. The mechanistic side of behavior is investigated and students explore how behavioral traits originate and evolve over time. Students will integrate their knowledge of how organisms work with an appreciation of why they work the way they do. At the end of the course, students will understand basic concepts in behavioral biology and know many of the experiments that have facilitated our understanding of this field. They will be able to construct hypotheses and design experiments that address behavioral phenomena. The laboratory portion of this course is based on individual projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Brodie
Prereq: 8 credits of 200-level work from Biological Sciences Coreq: BIOL-315L.
Advisory: BIOL-223 or BIOL-226 strongly recommended.

BIOL-319 Immunology with Laboratory

Spring. Credits: 4

The immune system protects the sterile interior of our bodies from the vast diversity of microbes in the outside world, adapting and improving from each encounter. How does it achieve this remarkable feat? This course will investigate the cells, organs, and biochemical signals that comprise innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as how they interact to identify and remove foreign pathogens. Emphasis will be placed on the human immune response to infectious diseases, with examples from clinical case studies and experimental models. The laboratory portion will provide experience with the foundational techniques of immunology research. Additional topics may include: autoimmunity, allergy, vaccination, transplantation, cancer, immune deficiency, and pathogen evasion strategies.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
R. Lijek
Prereq: BIOL-230. Coreq: BIOL-319L.

BIOL-320 Introduction to Transmission Electron Microscopy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Basic principles of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and potential uses in biological studies. Each student selects a project and learns the fundamentals of specimen preparation, operation of the TEM, and image acquisition. Preparation, assessment and interpretation of the resulting electron micrographs culminate in an individual portfolio.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: BIOL-230.
Notes: There will be an additional self-scheduled, weekly 1-2 hour lab during which students will receive microscope training.

BIOL-321 Conference Course

Selected topics from areas emphasized in the department according to needs of particular students. Study in small groups or by individuals.

BIOL-321AD Conference Course: 'Addiction, Superior Memory, and Diseases of the Brain'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will explore diseases of memory as well as extreme instances of phenomenal memory. We will review primary research literature and case studies to explore the changes that underlie addiction and memory. After reviewing the scientific literature, we will manipulate memory-related pathways in the brain of mice then evaluate the resulting changes in memory formation and behavior. This course will enable students to relate behavioral changes to changes in brain function.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. White
Prereq: 8 credits in Biological Sciences. Coreq: BIOL-321ADL.

BIOL-321HE Conference Course: 'Human Evolution'

Spring. Credits: 4

In this seminar we will explore ~6 million years of human evolutionary history. Key questions include: Why are we built the way we are? What are the biological characteristics that make us different from our primate relatives? What do we know about the hominin species that preceded Homo sapiens? How is our evolved biology mismatched with our modern environment, and what can we do about it? We will engage with these questions via readings (including primary scientific literature), discussion, writing assignments, and lecture.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Best
Prereq: 8 credits in Biological Sciences at the 200 level or above

BIOL-321LE Conference Course: 'Through the Microscopic Lens'

Fall. Credits: 4

How do you see the invisible? From viruses to pollen to cells breaking away from a tumor, the natural world is full of things that can be transparent, tiny, and fragile. To explore these worlds, scientists employ a wide variety of microscopes and it is important to understand how they work. What are the basic techniques in light and electron microscopy? What information is obtainable from these different instruments? In this seminar class, we will explore multiple microscopy applications. This class will focus on both optical (light, epifluorescence, and confocal) and electron (scanning and transmission) microscopy. We will use foundational texts and current scientific literature to learn how these techniques are used to answer a variety of scientific questions. Students will gain experience in both oral and written presentations and may never look at things the same way again.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Kiemle
Prereq: 8 credits in a STEM subject.

BIOL-321ME Conference Course: 'Molecular Ecology'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Over the past quarter century, molecular genetic methods have become increasingly important in ecological research. In this course, we will examine contemporary molecular genetic tools and learn how they can be used to answer ecological questions. Topics will include: reconstruction of ancestral relationships; measuring the size, diversity, and spatial structure of populations; characterization of migration and dispersal patterns; and identification of sensitive or threatened species and populations. We will explore these themes through foundational texts and current scientific literature, and we will analyze molecular genetic datasets in class to gain familiarity with available techniques.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Andras
Prereq: BIOL-230 (or BIOL-210), and BIOL-223 or BIOL-226.

BIOL-321PR Conference Course: 'Pregnancy and the Placenta'

Spring. Credits: 4

Pregnancy is a stunning feat of physiology. It is a conversation between two bodies -- maternal and fetal -- whose collective action blurs the very boundaries of the individual. In this course we will explore such questions as: what is pregnancy, and how does the ephemeral, essential organ known as the placenta call pregnancy into being? How is pregnancy sustained? How does it end? We will consider the anatomy of reproductive systems and the hormonal language of reproduction. We will investigate the nature of "sex" hormones, consider racial disparities in pregnancy outcome, and weigh the evidence that the intrauterine environment influences disease susceptibility long after birth.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
S. Bacon
Prereq: 8 credits at the 200 level in Biological Sciences.

BIOL-321RB Conference Course: 'Race and Biology'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this student-centered, discussion-based seminar, we will explore current hypotheses about the evolution of human variation, trace the history of how biology has been used in the construction of racial ideologies, and delve into the impacts of racial categorization on human health. We will investigate these themes through readings, videos, class discussions, student expert panels, and research papers. Students taking this course will improve their ability to: engage constructively in scholarly discussions; use verbal and written discourse to explore themes in science; use new knowledge to understand current issues; critically evaluate media information using evidence from scientific studies; and communicate new knowledge.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
R. Brodie
Prereq: 4 credits of Biological Sciences at the 200 level.

BIOL-321VX Conference Course: 'Outsmarting Pathogens'

Fall. Credits: 4

Smallpox, a disfiguring infection called "one of the most devastating diseases known to humanity" by the World Health Organization, was eradicated from the planet through immunization. Polio paralyzed 350,000 children a year until immunization reduced infection by 99%. Why have we succeeded in immunizing against these pathogens but not HIV or the common cold? Students in this seminar will discuss primary literature in immunology, microbiology, and epidemiology to learn how vaccines outsmart pathogens. Study of biological mechanisms will be complemented with exploration of the socioeconomic factors that influence vaccine development and usage. Students' independent research will connect their interests and current events to course concepts.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
R. Lijek
Prereq: BIOL-230.

BIOL-323 Plant Growth and Development

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is a study of the higher plant, its structure, organization, and development. We will examine the endogenous and environmental factors influencing plant growth and reproduction. Topics include anatomy, hormones and their mode of action, tropisms, photomorphogenesis, and flowering.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Frary
Prereq: Two courses from BIOL-200, BIOL-223, BIOL-226, or BIOL-230.

BIOL-325 Plant Diversity and Evolution

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the tremendous diversity of the plant kingdom, emphasizing the local flora. Evolutionary relationships are discussed on the basis of comparisons of reproductive biology, morphology, anatomy, cell structure, and molecular biology.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Frary
Prereq: 2 courses from BIOL-200, BIOL-210, BIOL-223, BIOL-226, or BIOL-230. Coreq: BIOL-325L.
Notes: offered alternate years

BIOL-326 Ocean Blues: State of the World's Oceans

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Ocean ecosystems are of tremendous ecological importance and provide many billions of dollars worth of services annually, yet our marine systems face serious threats due to overfishing, climate change, ocean acidification, pollution, and the spread of invasive species. Conservation and management strategies aim to protect our remaining martine resources and restore those that have been lost or damage. In this course, we will study the scientific evidence documenting the most pressing threats to marine ecosystems and examine available strategies for mitigating these threats. We will also explore cultural, economic, and political issues relevant to marine conservation and management.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Andras
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: Any 200-level science.
Advisory: Preference will be given to juniors and seniors who are participating in the Coastal and Marine Sciences certificate program.
Notes: Ocean Blues can be applied to any of the course categories required for the Coastal and Marine Sciences certificate.

BIOL-327 Microbiology

Spring. Credits: 4

We share planet Earth with an unimaginable number of "invisible" microbial life forms. In this course we will explore the structure, metabolism, genetics, and ecology of microbes, most prominently bacteria. Other microbes, including archaea, eukaryotic microbes, and viruses will also be considered. Whenever possible, the relationship between microbes and humans will be highlighted. Other goals will be for students to become comfortable with scientific primary literature and to hone their communication skills through discussions and written assignments. Finally, the laboratory portion of this course will highlight classic and modern techniques in microbiology.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Camp
Prereq: BIOL-230. Coreq: BIOL-327L.

BIOL-328 Human Physiology

Spring. Credits: 4

A course on the function of human organ systems, at both the cellular and whole tissue level. We will study the mechanisms that regulate a variety of organ systems and learn how these mechanisms respond to the changing needs of the individual. We will discuss how we used animal models to determine the normal function of these systems, practice the math used to model their function, and analyze how the activities of these systems are integrated.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Kelly
Prereq: BIOL-230 or BIOCH-311. Coreq: BIOL-328L.

BIOL-331 Theory and Application of Conservation Biology

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on advanced ecological theory applied to conservation. Class will combine lectures and discussions of primary scientific literature. Labs will include field trips to collect observational and experimental data and indoor exercises to explore the concepts of rarity, coexistence, and population viability with mathematical models. A community-based learning aspect is possible for the final project in this class.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Hoopes
Prereq: BIOL-223, BIOL-226, BIOL-315, or ENVST-200. Coreq: BIOL-331L.

BIOL-333 Neurobiology

Fall. Credits: 4

Description: We will study the electrical and chemical signals underlying the generation of the nerve impulse and synaptic transmission. We will then explore neuroanatomy, diseases of the brain and the neuronal circuits underlying learning and memory and sensory perception.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. White
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: BIOL-230 and 4 credits from Chemistry or Physics. Coreq: BIOL-333L.
Notes: Preference given to seniors

BIOL-337 Symbiotic Interactions

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From mutualism to parasitism, symbiotic interactions are a universal feature of life. In this seminar we will study the mechanisms underlying symbiotic interactions and consider their significance for the ecology and evolution of organisms. Through foundational texts and current scientific literature, we will explore some of the most spectacular and important examples of contemporary symbioses - from infectious diseases to coral reefs, to infectious diseases, to the vast communities of microbes that live on and in our bodies - and we will learn how symbiosis is responsible for major milestones in the history of life, such as the origin of the eukaryotic cell, the emergence of land plants, and the evolution of sex.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Andras
Prereq: BIOL-223 or BIOL-226.

BIOL-338 Evolution and Human Sexual Behavior

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will discuss patterns and variations of human sexual behavior and the likely role that evolution has played in shaping some of these patterns. We will discuss the evolution of sex, gender differences, principles of sexual selection, physiology, cultural differences in sexual behavior, mating systems, etc. We will follow a recently published book on this topic, and add readings from the primary literature. Students are expected to write one major research paper on any aspect of human sexual behavior of their choosing and to be ready to present their findings to the class towards the end of the semester.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
P. Brennan
Prereq: BIOL-226.

BIOL-340 Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course we will examine the role of molecular genetic analysis in the study of phenomena such as human disease (e.g., cancer), animal development, and gene regulation. We will also discuss new techniques for genomic analysis, including the science as well as the health, legal, ethical and moral issues involved. There will be group discussions of original research articles and review articles.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
C. Woodard
Prereq: BIOL-200 and BIOL-230.

BIOL-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

In this class, students will acquire hands-on experience in diverse aspects of the research process in any field of Biology, from familiarizing themselves with a research topic, generating interesting questions, designing experiments, acquiring technical skills, collecting and analyzing data, to writing and/or presenting their results. To inquire about enrollment, students should approach a Biological Sciences faculty member to identify mutual areas of interest. Typically, these conversations should occur well before registration, and the decision by the faculty member will depend on lab capacity. A single credit requires an average of 3 hrs of work per week. (Note: Some faculty may require a set weekly meeting time for a portion of this class.)

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: NOTE: See safety training restrictions in description of Biological Sciences 295

BIOL-399 Biology Journal Club/Data Hub

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

Reading and understanding research reports from the primary scientific literature is an essential skill for any scientist. Likewise, critiquing experimental proposals and freshly-minted data is one of the core components of the pursuit of science. Using the Biology Department Seminar series as a springboard, this course seeks to familiarize students with the process of understanding, appreciating, and critiquing scientific manuscripts. Additionally, drawing on projects being proposed and executed under the auspices of Biology 395, this course seeks to help students develop comfort discussing 'fresh' scientific data. This course will provide a valuable way to connect with active scientists, both developing and experienced, from within and beyond Mount Holyoke.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Hoopes, R. Lijek
Prereq: 8 credits in Biological Sciences.
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Credit/no credit grading only. Reading materials will be drawn primarily from research and review articles in the primary scientific literature. Data will be presented by students actively engaged in research projects. We will discuss data and readings as a group in class meetings.

CHEM-150 General Chemistry: Foundations of Structure and Reactivity

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of chemistry, including the electronic structure of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding, molecular shape, functional groups, stoichiometry, chemical reactivity and equilibrium. The laboratory emphasizes basic skills, quantitative chemical measurements, and principles discussed in lectures.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Ashby, W. Chen, M. Gomez, A. van Giessen
Coreq: CHEM-150L.
Notes: This course is offered in both fall and spring semesters.

CHEM-160 Integrated Introduction to Biology and Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This 8-credit course serves as a gateway to both the biology and chemistry core curricula. The course introduces and develops fundamental concepts in chemistry while also exploring the diverse range of strategies adopted by living systems to survive in different environments. This course prepares students for further study in chemistry (Chemistry 201) and/or biology (Biology 200). Students must register for both Biology 160 and Chemistry 160 as well as a single lab section (listed under Chemistry 160). Recommended for students interested in completing pre-health requirements or advanced study in biochemistry or neuroscience.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Broaders
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Coreq: BIOL-160 and CHEM-160L.
Notes: Students must co-enroll in Biology 160 and Chemistry 160 for a total of 8 credits; three 50 minute lectures, three 75 minute lectures, and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CHEM-199 Introduction to Research

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar is for first-year students who have a strong interest in the chemical sciences and will help to prepare them for scientific research. Students will be exposed to various research topics through reading, discussing, presenting, and writing about primary literature and attending selected department seminars. Throughout the semester students will carry out one research-style project in order to gain experience with the multifaceted nature of scientific inquiry. To jump start their research career on campus, each student will arrange meetings with at least two science faculty followed by a presentation and a written description on the faculty members' research topics.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
W. Chen
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: CHEM-150 or CHEM-160.
Advisory: Interested students should complete the online application.

CHEM-202 Organic Chemistry I

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces the core principles of the language of organic chemistry and extends their use to the description of the behavior and reactivity of carbonyl containing functional groups. Topics include representation and naming, the use of various spectroscopic approaches to probe molecular structure, an overview of bonding models and molecular geometry, the development of mechanistic drawing, and the application of this mechanistic approach to the reactions of a wide range of carbonyl compounds. The accompanying laboratory course introduces a range of essential analytical, preparative and purification techniques, provides practice in the interpretation of spectroscopic data, and culminates with the preparation of organic materials related to the lecture course.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Broaders, D. Cotter, D. Hamilton, K. McMenimen
Prereq: CHEM-150, or CHEM-160, or CHEM-101 and CHEM-201. Coreq: CHEM-202L.

CHEM-223 Analytical Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course serves as an introduction to quantitative analytical chemistry, with a combined emphasis on both classical analysis tools and fundamental instrumentation for the analytical chemist. Topics to be covered include figures of merit, statistical and error analysis, volumetric and gravimetric titrations, as well as commonly used sample preparation and analyte separation methods.In the laboratory, students will apply techniques covered in lecture to quantitation of analytes commonly seen in pharmaceutical, forensic, chemical and biological settings, as well as learn the fundamentals of method development and optimization.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Ashby, W. Chen
Prereq: CHEM-201 with a grade of C or better. Coreq: CHEM-223L.

CHEM-226 Poisons: Death by Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will look at the effect of poisons at the molecular, cellular, and physiological levels from the chemistry and biochemistry perspective. We will discuss: the classification of poisons and the common structural elements of the molecules within each class; the interaction of toxic molecules with proteins and nucleic acids present in the cell; the physiologic effect of toxins on different systems of the body; dosage effects and pharmacokinetics; the mechanisms by which antidotes work; and the analytical techniques that toxicologists use to determine which poisons are present in the body. The different classes of proteins will be discussed in the context of historical case studies.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. van Giessen
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: CHEM-201.
Advisory: When emailing the instructor to request permission for this class, be sure to include your class year.

CHEM-231 Inorganic Chemistry

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to the chemistry of elements. Topics include atomic structure and periodicity, symmetry, bonding theory, chemistry of the main-group elements and coordination chemistry. Laboratory introduces computational, preparative, and spectroscopic techniques.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Cotter
Prereq: CHEM-150 (or CHEM-160) and MATH-101. Coreq: CHEM-231L.

CHEM-291 Scientific Illustration and Data Visualization

Fall. Credits: 4

Doing experiments and gathering data are important, but far from the entirety of the scientific process. Understanding and communicating experimental outcomes often heavily rely on our ability to visually represent them. In this course, we will explore best practices for organizing and representing data, and learn how the choices we make influence the message our representations communicate. We will also develop a set of good design principles for scientific figures, and learn to prepare high quality plots and graphics for use in presentations, posters, reports, theses, and papers.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Broaders
Prereq: 8 credits in a STEM subject.

CHEM-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Note: Students conducting an independent laboratory research project for course credit in a department, program, or laboratory covered by the College's chemical hygiene plan must participate in a safety training session before beginning research.

CHEM-302 Organic Chemistry II

Fall. Credits: 4

This course provides a direct continuation of Organic Chemistry I (CHEM-202) and develops and extends many of the concepts and approaches developed therein. Topics include stereochemistry, substitution and elimination reactions, conformational analysis, addition reactions of multiple bonds, substitution reactions of aromatic systems, and a broad extension of the carbonyl chemistry introduced in the preceding class. Consideration will be given to the development of organic syntheses of specific materials and attendant issues of compatibility and selectivity in reaction choice. The scope and reach of the spectroscopic methods introduced in Organic Chemistry I will be extended and applied to structure determination. Laboratory work will include the preparation, isolation and purification of a wide range of organic materials of relevance to the lecture course.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Hamilton
Prereq: CHEM-202 with grade of C or better. Coreq: CHEM-302L.

CHEM-308 Chemical Thermodynamics with Lab

Fall. Credits: 4

A consideration of the contribution of thermodynamics to the understanding of the 'driving forces' for physical chemical changes and the nature of the equilibrium state. Topics will include statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. van Giessen
Prereq: MATH-203 or PHYS 205, and CHEM-223 or CHEM-231, all with grade of C or better. Coreq: CHEM-308L.

CHEM-309 Introduction to Materials

Spring. Credits: 4

This integrated lecture/lab course provides an introduction to different types of materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites, emphasizing structure and property relationships. The principles behind the design and implementation of materials as well as advances in materials in the areas of nano-, bio-, and electronic technology will be presented. Class time is split among lecture, discussion, and laboratory.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
W. Chen
Prereq: CHEM-201 or CHEM-231, CHEM-202, and MATH-101

CHEM-311 Protein Biochemistry and Cellular Metabolism

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is a rigorous introduction to the study of protein molecules and their role as catalysts of the cell. Topics include general principles of protein folding, protein structure-function correlation, enzyme kinetics and mechanism, carbohydrate and lipid biochemistry, and metabolic pathways (catabolic and anabolic) and their interaction and cross-regulation. Biological transformation of energy is considered in light of the principle of thermodynamics.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-311, BIOL-311
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOL-230, and CHEM-302, and CHEM-231. Coreq: BIOCH-318.

CHEM-312 Chemistry of Biomolecules

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

An examination of the major ideas of biochemistry from the point of view of the chemical sciences rather than the life sciences. The focus will be on structure and reactivity of important biomolecules and the role of energetics and reaction dynamics in biochemical processes. Major metabolic pathways are covered, including those of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-312
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Prereq: CHEM-202 with a grade of C or better.
Advisory: This course is NOT intended for biochemistry majors, who must take BIOCH-311 and BIOCH-314. CHEM-312 students may take BIOCH-318 concurrently.

CHEM-314 Nucleic Acids Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an in-depth examination of DNA and RNA structures and how these structures support their respective functions during replication, transcription, and translation of the genetic material. Emphasis is on the detailed mechanisms associated with each step of gene expression. Discussions incorporate many recent advances brought about by recombinant DNA technology.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-314, BIOL-314
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Berry
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: BIOCH-311. Coreq: CHEM-314L.
Advisory: CHEM-302 can be taken concurrently

CHEM-316 Chemical Biology

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The field of chemical biology applies chemical perspectives and tools to the study of biological systems. In this course, we will examine the ways that synthetic chemistry has provided techniques that support, complement, and expand on those used in biochemistry, drug discovery, and molecular and cell biology. Topics may include solid phase biomolecule synthesis, combinatorial chemistry, bioconjugation, molecular probes, protein engineering, drug delivery, and synthetic biology.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Broaders
Prereq: CHEM-302 and any other 300-level chemistry or biochemistry course.

CHEM-317 Principles of Polymer Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the study of molecules of high molecular weights with emphasis on synthetic rather than naturally occurring polymers. Topics include polymer syntheses, structures, and characterization.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
W. Chen
Prereq: CHEM-302.

CHEM-321 Forensic Chemistry

Fall. Credits: 4

Forensic chemists apply their knowledge of analytical chemistry to the identification of trace unknowns present in a crime scene. In this course, the function of chemical instrumentation such as chromatography, spectroscopy, and microscopy will be discussed. In addition, we will investigate how this instrumentation can be used for the analysis of various types of physical evidence, such as inks, fibers, drugs, and arson/explosion evidence. Finally, this course will also serve as a brief introduction to pharmacokinetics, as well as an introduction to concepts within forensic science such as expert testimony and quality assurance of forensic analysis.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Ashby
Prereq: CHEM-202 and CHEM-223.

CHEM-325 Atomic and Molecular Structure with Lab

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to experimental and theoretical approaches to the determination of the structure of atoms, molecules, and chemical bonds. Classroom work provides background in the theory of atomic and molecular structure and an introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Gomez
Prereq: MATH-203 or PHYS-205, and CHEM-223 or CHEM-231, all with grade of C or better. Coreq: CHEM-325L.
Advisory: MATH-203 is recommended.

CHEM-328 From Lilliput to Brobdingnag: Bridging the Scales Between Science and Engineering

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The performance of many engineered devices is dependent on macroscopic factors (pressure, temperature, flow, conductivity). As a result, engineers often model devices macroscopically considering atomistic level details only through fixed parameters. These parameters do not always capture the full atomistic level picture. More accurate multi-scale approaches for modeling macroscopic properties use basic atomistic level chemistry at key points in larger scale simulations. This course is an introduction to such approaches focusing on fuel cells as a concrete example. Basic scientific principles will be developed along side of basic engineering principles through project/case studies.

Crosslisted as: PHYS-328
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Gomez
Prereq: MATH-102 and any chemistry or physics course.

CHEM-329 Cosmetic Chemistry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will introduce the chemistry, formulation, and physical characteristics of personal care products. The topics will include basic skin physiology, hygiene products, adornment products for face, nail, and hair, as well as current trends and advances in cosmetic dermatology. An integral part of the course will involve hands-on experience in making and characterizing some common skincare and cosmetic products.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
W. Chen
Prereq: CHEM-302.

CHEM-330 Advanced Topics in Chemistry

CHEM-330RN Advanced Topics in Chemistry: 'The RNA World: The Origin of Life to Modern Cells'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

RNA is believed by many to have been the first macromolecule to evolve. In a hypothesized "RNA world," RNA would have simultaneously served the roles of carrying genetic information and catalyzing chemical reactions within early cells. The past three decades have been a renaissance for RNA biology, as researchers have uncovered the critical role RNA plays in eukaryotic and bacterial gene regulation and defense, as well as the potential for RNAs to perform catalysis. This seminar will introduce students to modern approaches to study the structure and function of RNA and will explore the chemical and biological roles RNA plays in modern cells as well as its role in the origin of life.

Crosslisted as: BIOCH-330RN
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Berry
Prereq: BIOCH-311, or BIOCH-314, or CHEM-312.

CHEM-336 Organic Synthesis

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course emphasizes recent developments in synthetic organic chemistry and deals with general synthetic methods and specific examples of natural product synthesis. It covers such topics as new methods of oxidation and reduction, stereospecific olefin formation, ring-forming reactions, and methods of carbon-carbon bond formation. The application of these reactions to the synthesis of naturally occurring compounds is examined. A general strategy for the synthesis of complex molecules is also presented.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Broaders
Prereq: CHEM-302.

CHEM-339 The Organic Chemistry of Biological Pathways

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the underlying organic chemistry of biological pathways and thereby seeks to build a framework for understanding biological transformations from the perspective of mechanistic organic chemistry. Beginning with common biological mechanisms, and drawing parallels with their sophomore organic chemistry counterparts, a broad overview will be constructed of the pathways by which the key classes of biological molecules--lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, nucleotides--are manufactured, modified, and consumed. Several specific biosyntheses will also be dissected from a mechanistic perspective. These case studies will include antibiotics, an alkaloid, and heme.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Hamilton
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: CHEM-302.

CHEM-346 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical Systems With Lab

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the fundamental principles of physical chemistry with an emphasis on their application to the study of biological molecules and processes. Topics will include statistical mechanics, thermodynamics and enzyme kinetics. Discussion of applications will relate commonly used experimental techniques -- such as spectroscopy and calorimetry -- to the fundamental principles on which they are based. In addition, students will gain experience and confidence in the use of mathematical models to describe biochemical systems.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. van Giessen
Restrictions: This course is limited to Biochemistry majors only.
Prereq: MATH-203 or PHYS-205, and CHEM-223 or CHEM-231, all with a grade of C or better. Coreq: CHEM-346L.

CHEM-348 Using Data Science to Find Hidden Chemical Rules

Fall. Credits: 4

Chemists have always been interested in understanding patterns in their data. The scientific method uses observations to create theories and models to understand physical phenomena. Data science algorithms allow us to find unexpected patterns in chemical data. New chemical theories can be developed using a combination of data from either experiment or simulation, algorithms and physical insight. This class uses the case method providing three challenge problems to find hidden chemical rules from large chemical data sets through algorithms and physical insight. There will be lectures on the physical/chemical problems, the data sets, and the possible algorithms to consider before the teams of students tackle these problems. The teams will write papers on their findings and use the peer review process to improve their papers.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Gomez
Prereq: MATH-102 and either any chemistry or any computer science class.

CHEM-349 Food Chemistry: the Science of the Kitchen

Spring. Credits: 4

Food Chemistry is an integrated lecture/lab course that focuses on the molecular bases of chemical phenomena that dictate the behavior of foods. We will examine topics such as trans fats, baking soda as a leavening agent in baking, the chemical basis for ripening of fruit, pectin as a cellular glue, artificial sweeteners, GMOs, and enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning of foods. The emphasis is on the major food components (water, lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates) and their behavior under various conditions. Content will be discussed using a variety of contexts including primary scientific literature, mainstream media, and food blogs. Laboratories provide opportunities for students to observe, manipulate, and explore topics in food chemistry under conditions of particular relevance to food processing.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. McMenimen
Prereq: CHEM-302 with a grade of C or better.

CHEM-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: See safety training restrictions in description of Chemistry 295

CLASS-205 Cleopatra: "The Not Humble Woman

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course Cleopatra will be considered both as a political figure of importance in her own right and also as an enemy queen, representing a presumptuous challenge to the political hegemony and cultural values of the Romans. She may serve, therefore, as a lens through which one may view social and political tensions within Roman society over the nature of authority and empire. Readings include Vergil, Horace, Propertius, Lucan, Caesar, Sallust, Plutarch and the plays of Shakespeare and Shaw, where she is ambivalently portrayed as a woman who desires power or, contrariwise, as a romantic idealist who scorns temporal powers in fulfillment of private desires.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Arnold
Notes: Taught in English.

CLASS-211 Gods and Mortals: Ancient Greek and Roman Myth

Spring. Credits: 4

We will accompany Odysseus on his return from Troy, retrieve the Golden Fleece with Jason, and race with Ovid through his witty -- and often troubling -- retelling of Greek myths from a Roman perspective. This course examinies how Greek and Roman authors and artists from very different periods used myth to explore questions about life, art and politics. Works may include: Homer, Odyssey; Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica; Ovid, Metamorphoses and Heroides; Greek tragedy, and ancient images representing myths.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Debnar
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.
Advisory: Juniors and seniors should contact the professor for permission.
Notes: Taught in English. Optional screenings of films related to ancient myth.

CLASS-212 Greek Tragedy, American Drama, and Film

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The Greeks, beginning with Homer, saw the world from an essentially tragic perspective. The searing question of why human societies and the human psyche repeatedly break down in tragic ruin and loss, particularly in the conflicts of war and in the betrayal of personal bonds of love and friendship, fascinated them as it still does us. The most consistent themes that emerged from such examination are the tragedy of self-knowledge and illusion, the tragedy of desire, the tragedy of crime and redemption, and tragedy as a protest against social injustice. This course examines the critical influence of the three most important Athenian dramatists, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, on the works of Nobel winner Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller and important filmmakers, who have tried to recreate the powerful atmosphere and impact of the Greek tragic theater or reworked the tragic themes of classical myth for their own purposes in the modern age.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
B. Arnold

CLASS-226 Bread and Circuses: The Politics of Public Entertainment in Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Bread and circuses (panem et circenses) was a catchphrase in the Roman empire that described the political strategy of controlling an unruly populace through free bread and public entertainment. Against a backdrop of Roman social and political institutions, this course focuses on the imperial ideology, aristocratic ethos, and cultural practices that underpinned this catchphrase, as well as questions concerning the careers of entertainers--gladiators, charioteers, and actors--who were at once celebrities and social outcasts; the rules of spectatorship at the games; the use of these games as a form of social control; and the logistics of feeding the city population.

Crosslisted as: HIST-226
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

CLASS-227 Ancient Greece

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will trace the emergence and expansion of Greek civilization in the Mediterranean between the Bronze Age and Alexander the Great. Among themes to be explored are political structures, trade, slavery, gender relations, and religion, as well as the contributions of ancient Greeks to literary genres (drama, rhetoric, historiography, philosophy) and to the visual arts. Throughout we will consider how the history of the ancient Greeks can speak to modern concerns. Sources will include works of ancient Greek literature and history (e.g., Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Plutarch) as well as archaeological and epigraphic evidence.

Crosslisted as: HIST-227
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Debnar

CLASS-228 Ancient Rome

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Ancient Rome and its empire can be viewed both as a measure of human achievement and a cautionary tale of the corrupting effects of unbridled power. This course covers the history of Ancient Rome from its mythologized beginnings (753 BCE) to the rise and spread of Christianity under the Emperor Constantine (312 CE). Topics include the creation and development of Rome's republican form of government as well as its eventual transition to monarchy, the causes and consequences of the acquisition of empire, the role of the army in administering the provinces and defending the frontiers, the image of emperor, the economy, and religion.

Crosslisted as: HIST-228
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

CLASS-229 The Tyrant and Gladiator: Bad Roman Emperors from Caligula to Commodus

Fall. Credits: 4

Caligula was a god (or so he thought); Nero fiddled while Rome burned; Commodus dressed as a gladiator and fought man and beast in the arena. The history of the Roman empire is replete with scandalous stories about eccentric and even insane emperors whose reigns raise questions about the nature of the emperor's power and his role in administering the empire. In this course a close study of Roman imperial biography and historiography--the source of so many of these stories of bad emperors--will be weighed against documentary and archaeological evidence in order to reveal the dynamic between the emperor, his court, and his subjects that was fundamental to the political culture of imperial Rome.

Crosslisted as: HIST-229
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

CLASS-230 The City of Rome From Romulus to Constantine

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A detailed survey of the archaeology of the city of Rome from its origin in the early Iron Age to the beginning of the fourth century CE. The principal monuments and architectural development of the ancient city will be discussed against a broader cultural and historical background, with an emphasis on the powerful families and individuals responsible for the shaping of the urban landscape, and the specific social and political circumstances that gave the monuments meaning.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-290CR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Landon
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CLASS-231 The City of Athens from Theseus to Alaric

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A detailed survey of the principal surviving monuments and overall architectural development of the city of Athens from its origins in the Bronze Age to the end of the 4th century C. E. The archaeological evidence will be discussed against a broader cultural and historical background, with an emphasis on the specific people and events that helped to shape the city and the general social and political circumstances that gave the monuments meaning.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-290TH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Landon

CLASS-232 War and Imperialism in the Ancient World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Ancient Greeks and Romans viewed warfare as an abiding part of the human condition. The literature and artwork of the ancient world are filled with images of the two faces of war: it conferred great glory on the combatants but at the cost of tremendous horror and suffering. In this course we will examine warfare from archaic Greece and the rise of the city-state (ca. 800 B.C.E.) to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west (ca. 476 C.E.). We will consider such topics as the culture and ethics of war and imperialism, logistics and strategies of warfare, as well as armor, weaponry and battlefield tactics.

Crosslisted as: HIST-216
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
G. Sumi

CLASS-253 The Spartans: Myth and History

Fall. Credits: 4

In contrast to democratic Athens, oligarchic Sparta was renowned for its secrecy and skillful use of propaganda. Thus, it presents difficult challenges for historical study. In this course we will try to peer behind the "Spartan mirage" to determine how much the Spartans really differed from other ancient Greeks. We will then try to understand the use of Spartans as models for later polities and for groups like the Nazis and Alt-right. Topics: government, education, and citizenship; the role of women, eugenics, and slavery; the use and misuse of the image of Sparta. Readings will include Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Plutarch, and modern scholarship on specific topics.

Crosslisted as: HIST-253SP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Debnar
Notes: With permission of the instructor, this course may be taken by juniors and seniors for 300-level credit in Classics.

CLASS-260 Knowing God

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the following key texts from the ancient world that treat significantly the problem of knowing God and the mystery enveloping such knowledge: Sophocles' Oedipus the King, Plato's Phaedo, Cicero's Concerning the Nature of the Gods, Job, Paul's Epistle to the Romans, and others. Attention is also given to the different ways of thinking about the divine and human natures in these works, which are broadly reflective of Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian value systems.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225KG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Arnold

CLASS-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

CLASS-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

COLL-110 STEM Transitions for Transfer Students

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This 1-credit seminar is especially designed for students transferring to Mount Holyoke to pursue a major in the sciences or mathematics. The course will connect new transfer students to people and resources that will help them to fully engage in the sciences at Mount Holyoke and provide a space to practice the modes of discourse common to upper-level science and math courses. We explore interdisciplinary topics such as the biology of stress, and learn about science opportunities (including internships) and effective strategies for excelling in science and math courses. We use the primary literature as a text, and gain practice with analytical writing in a setting specifically designed for transfer students. The curriculum is guided by research-based best practices and is designed in consultation with former transfer students.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Bacon
Instructor permission required.

COLL-115 Global Challenges

COLL-208 Histories, Memories, and Legacies: The Social Justice Protests of 2020

Spring. Credits: 2

In the United States, the summer of 2020 will likely be remembered as a pivotal moment because of the devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the national protests against racial injustice and police violence. In this course we will examine the histories, memories, and legacies of the past that provide a broad social and historical context for these mass demonstrations and calls for racial justice. We will focus on the intersectionality of race, gender, inequality, and racialized violence with the objective of deepening our understanding of contemporary discussion in the U.S. on matters of anti-racism and justice.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
K. Sanders-McMurtry, D. Mosby
Instructor permission required.
Notes: This course will require in-person meetings on campus and is only open to residential students.

COLL-211 Reflecting Back: Connecting Internship and Research to Your Liberal Arts Education

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Learn to speak with confidence and clarity about your summer internship or research project. Connect it to you academic coursework. What have you learned? How is it useful? What are your next steps? Students will reflect on their experience and collaborate with others to generate useful knowledge. Required for the Nexus but open to all students. For more information, email nexus@mtholyoke.edu.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Shea, E. Townsley
Notes: Fall 2020: Class meets for short sessions Aug 31, Sep 3, Sep 10, Sep 14, Sep 17, Sep 24, Sep 28, Oct 1. All fall 2020 students will present at LEAP Symposium on 10/2.

COLL-224 Being Human in STEM

Spring. Credits: 4

This is an interactive course that combines academic inquiry and community engagement to investigate the theme of diversity and climate within STEM fields. In the first half of the semester, we ground our understanding of the STEM experience at Mount Holyoke in national and global contexts, specifically looking at the way in in which gender, class, race, sexuality, and geographic upbringing might shape these experiences. We accomplish this through reading scholarly and popular literature and surveying existing evidence-based inclusive practices at a range of educational institutions. We supplement this research with interviews with members of the Mount Holyoke community. In the second half of the semester, students design their own group projects that apply the findings of their research to develop resources and encourage the STEM community, whether at the college, local, or national level. Coursework includes weekly readings, reflective writing, in-class discussion, and will culminate in a public presentation on the group projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Markley
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

COLL-225 Topics in Leadership

COLL-231 Fundamentals of Microscopy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

A wide variety of microscopes are employed in a multitude of scientific and industrial applications. This course covers important microscopy basics including scale, the relationship between reality and the image, and the kind of information that can be captured with different types of microscopes. In three hours of lecture/demonstration per week, students will explore the basic principles of different forms of microscopy including optical, electron, and atomic force. We will gain practical hands-on experience with the many forms of microscopy and learn the procedures and tools of the trade necessary to become a proficient microscopist.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Kiemle
Prereq: Two courses in STEM.

COLL-321 Fundamentals of Microscopy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A wide variety of microscopes are employed in a multitude of scientific and industrial applications. This course covers important microscopy basics including scale, the relationship between reality and the image, and the kind of information that can be captured with different types of microscopes. In three hours of lecture/demonstration per week, students will explore the basic principles of different forms of microscopy including optical, electron, and atomic force. We will gain practical hands-on experience with the many forms of microscopy and learn the procedures and tools of the trade necessary to become a proficient microscopist.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Kiemle
Prereq: 8 credits in STEM subjects.

COMSC-100 Computing and the Digital World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to basic computer science concepts. Lectures will cover topics such as the origins of computing, computer architecture, artificial intelligence, and robotics. There will be some programming exercises.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
H. Pon-Barry
Notes: Students may not take this course after Computer Science 106 or 151.

COMSC-103 Networks

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How do opinions, fads, and political movements spread through society? What makes food webs and financial markets robust? What are the technological, political, and economic forces at play in online communities? This course examines connections between the social, technological, and natural worlds through the lens of networks. Students will learn basics of graph theory and game theory and apply them to build mathematical models of processes that take place in networks.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Advisory: No prior study of computer science is expected. Students may not take this course after Computer Science 100 or 151. Students may not take Computer Science 100 after taking 103, but may take 151.
Notes: Course does not count toward the Computer Science major or minor.

COMSC-106 Fundamentals of Applied Computing

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Have you ever used Google's image search tool and wondered how the search results were found? Why is it so difficult for a computer to "see" as we do? Computer scientists are actively researching how to approach this challenge of "computer vision." This course will introduce the fundamentals of applied computing using computer vision as a motivating theme. Students will learn foundations of programming (in the Python programming language) before working with computational tools more independently.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. St. John
Advisory: No prior study of computer science is expected. Students may not take this course after Computer Science 100 or 151. Students may not take Computer Science 100 after taking 106, but may take 151.
Notes: Course does not count toward the Computer Science major or minor.

COMSC-108 Computing and Dance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designers are continually innovating ways of incorporating technology into today's world, from apps that monitor physical activity to 3D-printed toe shoes to dancing avatars trained via Machine Learning. The recent emergence of low-cost, user- friendly components makes this new world of design accessible to a broad community. In this course, students will think critically about technologies that can enhance dance technique and performance. Through a sequence of hands-on workshops on electronics basics and microcontroller programming, students will gain the surprisingly minimal level of comfort and background necessary to learn tools to produce prototypes and address these dance-related technologies.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
L. Ballesteros

COMSC-109 iDesign Studio

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designers are continually innovating ways of incorporating technology into today's world, from projections of butterflies on Grammy performance dresses to "smart" purses that sense when your wallet is missing. The recent emergence of low-cost, user-friendly components is making this new world of design accessible to a broad community. In this course, students will think critically about products already in the marketplace and will be given the tools to create their own designs. A sequence of hands-on workshops on electronics basics and microcontroller programming will provide the surprisingly minimal level of comfort and background in technology required to produce prototypes of these designs.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Y. Su, The department
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-year students.

COMSC-120 Introduction to R

Fall. Credits: 1

An introduction to the programming language R and how it can be used for statistical analysis and visualization of data. Students will learn how to write basic R programs that can read, write, and manipulate data. They will make use of R functions for executing common statistical analysis and learn how to display the results using graphs and charts. Through a series of projects, students will get experience with writing their own functions, learn how to make use of R documentation and how to extend their own knowledge of the language.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Barr
Notes: Credit/no credit grading.

COMSC-121 Object-Oriented Programming

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

This course will introduce object-oriented programming to students who have a foundation in Python programming and are interested in continuing on to COMSC-205 Data Structures. It includes coverage of classes, objects, methods, and sub-typing.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Barr
Prereq: COMSC-150 or computer science placement test.
Notes: This course will be taught as a lab course (or flipped classroom style) with professor support both during the scheduled time and in additional office hours time. Therefore it is open to students whose time zone prevents them from being available during the scheduled time. Each student will be expected, however, to commit to a regular office hours time when they can meet with the professor.

COMSC-122 Java Programming Language

Spring. Credits: 1

This course will teach the Java programming language to students who already have programming ability in another object-oriented programming language.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Barr
Prereq: COMSC-205PY.
Notes: This course will be taugh as a lab course (or flipped classroom style) with professor support both during the scheduled time and in additional office hours time. Therefore it is open to students whose time zone prevents them from being available during the scheduled time. Each student will be expected, however, to commit to a regular office hours time when they can meet with the professor.

COMSC-132 Engineering for Everyone

Spring. Credits: 4

Engineers change the world we live in every day by developing and improving nearly every aspect of our lives. In this course, we will study the interaction of technology and society and how the engineering design process helps shape the world we live in. Engineering comprises many disciplines, but one common theme is the engineering design process: research, problem definition, feasibility, conceptualization, prototyping, and testing. In this class, students will learn the engineering design process through application to contemporary technological and societal issues put into practice with pitch presentations, design reviews, prototypes, and written reports.

Crosslisted as: PHYS-132
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. McTiernan
Advisory: This course has no prerequisites and is recommended for all students interested in engineering and technology.
Notes: Students interested in continuing with the Engineering Nexus are strongly recommended to take the course.

COMSC-150 Introduction to Computer Science

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Introduction to the field of computer science. Introduces students to Python programming including algorithms, basic data structures (lists, dictionaries), and programming techniques. Does not include object-oriented programming.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
L. Ballesteros, V. Barr, B. Lerner, A. St. John

COMSC-151 Introduction to Computational Problem Solving

Thematic introduction to the field of computer science. Draws on problems found in the thematic focus of each topics course. All topics courses within COMSC-151 cover the same concepts and skills and satisfy requirements in the Computer Science major and minor as well as the Data Science major.

COMSC-151AA Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Algorithmic Arts'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques. Explores computation as an artistic medium, examining a range of computational art practices. By combining aspects of a studio art course, a media art survey, and an introductory computing lab, course participants will develop a solid foundation in computer programming approaches and techniques as they pertain to art production as well as an understanding of their emerging importance in the contemporary art world.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
E. Mendelowitz
Coreq: COMSC-151AAL.
Notes: Additional seats will open for all students after first year students have registered.

COMSC-151AR Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Artificial Intelligence'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques, and basic methods from artificial intelligence. Includes discussion of foundational papers in AI. Programming exercises will explore what is necessary in order to get computers to operate in ways that seem intelligent such as in game play or solving puzzles.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr
Coreq: COMSC-151ARL.
Notes: Additional seats will open for all students after first year students have registered.

COMSC-151DS Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Big Data'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques, and focuses on data collection, preparation, analysis. Explores programming for data manipulation, the presentation and representation of data, and the ethics of working with data at scale.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
B. Lerner
Coreq: COMSC-151DSL.

COMSC-151EN Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Environmental Studies'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques. Students will explore using computing to interpret data relating to global temperature changes, ocean currents, earthquakes, and water quality.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Coreq: COMSC-151ENL.

COMSC-151HC Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Humanities Computing'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques. Students will explore solving problems that arise in humanities disciplines: various forms of text analysis, image manipulation, animation, and sound manipulation.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
L. Ballesteros
Coreq: COMSC-151HCL.

COMSC-151MD Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Computers in Medical Technology'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques. Students will explore solving problems that arise in using computers to interpret biological data such as DNA sequences, cancer tumor shape/size, and cardiac waveforms.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Coreq: COMSC-151MDL.
Notes: Additional seats will open for all students after first year students have registered.

COMSC-151SG Introduction to Computational Problem Solving: 'Computing for Social Good'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces students to algorithms, basic data structures, and programming techniques. Includes discussion of the ways in which computing can improve human lives and society, such as improving accessibility for people with disabilities, or helping organize a rescue team during an emergency.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
B. Lerner
Coreq: COMSC-151SGL.

COMSC-201 Advanced Problem-Solving and Elementary Data Structures

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course builds on the basic programming concepts learned in Computer Science 101. Emphasis is on developing the skills needed to write more sophisticated programs. This includes strategies to aid in assuring the correctness of programs through the use of assertions and unit testing as well as advanced Java features such as inheritance, polymorphism, and network programming. We will also introduce some widely used data structures such as vectors and linked lists. This course is programming-intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-101 with a grade of C or better. Coreq: COMSC-201L.
Notes: Students must select a lab with the same instructor as the lecture.

COMSC-205 Data Structures

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course builds on the basic programming concepts learned in Computer Science 151, shifting the focus to the organization of data in order to improve efficiency and simplicity of programs. Topics include the study of abstract data types and data structures (such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees). This course is programming-intensive and introduces the Java programming language.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr, H. Pon-Barry
Prereq: COMSC-151 with a grade of C or better. Coreq: COMSC-205L.
Advisory: This course cannot be taken by students who have completed COMSC-201 or COMSC-211.

COMSC-205PY Data Structures (in Python)

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course builds on the basic programming concepts learned in Computer Science 150 and Computer Science 121, shifting the focus to the organization of data in order to improve efficiency and simplicity of programs. Topics include the study of abstract data types and data structures (such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees). This course is programming-intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr, H. Pon-Barry
Prereq: COMSC-150 (with grade of C or better) and COMSC-121; or COMSC-151 (with grade of C or better).
Notes: Students taking this course will need to take COMSC-122 Java Programming Language before continuing with COMSC-225.

COMSC-211 Advanced Data Structures

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Using Java. Solving problems with computers is accomplished by writing programs that operate on data to produce a desired result. The way data is organized and presented to the program can significantly affect its efficiency and simplicity and can sometimes determine whether or not a program can be written to solve the problem at all. This course presents ways of organizing data into 'data structures' and analyzes how structuring the data can improve program performance.This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-201.

COMSC-215 Software Design

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Building large software systems introduces new challenges to software development. Appropriate design decisions early in the development of large software can make a major difference in developing software that is correct and maintainable. In this course, students will learn techniques and tools to help them address these problems and develop larger software projects, improving their skills in designing, writing, debugging, and testing software. Topics include design patterns, UML, designing for maintainability, software architecture, and designing concurrent and fault tolerant systems. Programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
B. Lerner
Prereq: COMSC-201.

COMSC-221 Introduction to Computing Systems

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course looks at the inner workings of a computer and computer systems. It is an introduction to computer architecture. Specific topics include assembly language programming, memory, and parallelism. This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
L. Ballesteros
Prereq: COMSC-201, COMSC-205, or COMSC-205PY.
Advisory: The department recommends, but does not require, that students take COMSC-225 prior to COMSC-221.

COMSC-225 Software Design and Development

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Building large software systems introduces new challenges to software development. Appropriate design decisions and programming methodology can make a major difference in developing software that is correct and maintainable. In this course, students will learn techniques and tools that are used to build correct and maintainable software, improving their skills in designing, writing, debugging, and testing software. Topics include object-oriented design, testing, design patterns, software architecture, and designing concurrent and fault tolerant systems. This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
B. Lerner, Y. Su
Prereq: COMSC-205 with a grade of C or better, or COMSC-205PY and COMSC-122 with grades of C or better.
Advisory: Students who have taken COMSC-215 may not take COMSC-225.

COMSC-226 Engineering Robotic Systems

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This intermediate-level course presents a hands-on introduction to robotics. Each participant will construct and modify a robot controlled by an Arduino-compatible microcontroller. Topics include kinematics, inverse kinematics, control-theory, sensors, mechatronics, and motion planning. Material will be delivered through one weekly lecture and one weekly guided laboratory. Assignments include a lab-preparatory homework, guided lab sessions, and out-of-class projects that build upon the in-class sessions. Participants will use the Makerspace facilities to fabricate and demonstrate their robots.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-109 or COMSC-201 or COMSC-205.

COMSC-243 Topic

COMSC-243EM Topic: 'Embodied Interaction'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class will expose students to programming techniques used in computer-based interactive art including real-time graphics, data visualization, human-computer interaction, sensor networks, computer vision, and physical computing through analysis of existing computational art and synthesis of original works. The course will place particular emphasis on embodied interation -- interaction that uses sensors to react to the whole body. Weekly assignments and reading will serve to reinforce concepts from lectures, build technical skills, and develop a personal aesthetic.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-225.

COMSC-243MS Topic: 'Modeling and Simulation'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class will expose students to modeling and simulation of physical systems. Drawing on examples from a number of different disciplines, the course will cover modeling and analyzing a physical system, using models to predict behavior. Students will strengthen programming skills and learn additional computational skills necessary for simulation in areas such as population growth, disease spread, heat transfer, projectile motion.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-151 or COMSC-201.

COMSC-243WS Topic: 'Web Search'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores how web search engines work and will cover basic text processing, index construction and compression, crawler architecture, link analysis and retrieval functions, spam reduction, and system evaluation. It will also explore applications such as clustering, classification, duplicate detection, web mining, and online advertising.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211.

COMSC-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

COMSC-311 Theory of Computation

Fall. Credits: 4

Are there any limits to what computers can do? Does the answer to this question depend on whether you use a PC or a Mac? Is C more powerful than PASCAL? This seminar explores these questions by investigating several models of computation, illustrating the power and limitations of each of these models, and relating them to computational problems and applications. Topics include finite state automata, pushdown automata, grammars, Turing machines, the Universal Turing Machine, and computability.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. St. John
Prereq: COMSC-201 or COMSC-205; MATH-232.

COMSC-312 Algorithms

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

How does Mapquest find the best route between two locations? How do computers help to decode the human genome? At the heart of these and other complex computer applications are nontrivial algorithms. While algorithms must be specialized to an application, there are some standard ways of approaching algorithmic problems that tend to be useful in many applications. Among other topics, we will explore graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and network flow. We will learn to recognize when to apply each of these strategies as well as to evaluate the expected runtime costs of the algorithms we design.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
D. Sheldon, A. St. John
Prereq: COMSC-201 or COMSC-205 or COMSC-205PY; MATH-232.

COMSC-316 Developing Innovative Software

Spring. Credits: 4

Tired of writing programs that nobody ever uses? Then, this is the course for you. Many people come up with novel ideas for software, but lack the resources or ability to develop the software. Students will apply their programming skills to develop and deliver software based on the requirements of a client. Students will learn critical communication skills required to work with a client, work in teams with classmates, and experience the software lifecycle from requirements elicitation through delivery. Students will synthesize many topics learned in prior courses as well as explore new technologies required to complete a specific project. Programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
B. Lerner
Prereq: COMSC-215 or COMSC-225.

COMSC-322 Operating Systems

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

An introduction to the issues involved in orchestrating the use of computer resources. Topics include operating system evolution, file-handling systems, memory management, virtual memory, resource scheduling, multiprogramming, deadlocks, concurrent processes, protection, and design principles. Course emphasis: understanding the effects of operating system design on computer system performance. This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. McCauley
Prereq: COMSC-221, and either COMSC-211 or COMSC-225.

COMSC-331 Computer Graphics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The creation of pictorial images using a computer. Topics include drawing of two- and three-dimensional scenes using OpenGL and other graphical environments; transformations of objects (translations, scalings, rotations, shearings) using homogeneous coordinates; creating perspective in three-dimensional drawing; algorithms for enhancing realism and visual effect; and ray tracing. Students will complete a number of graphics projects based on readings and class discussion.This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211, and at least one of the following: MATH-203, MATH-211, or MATH-232.

COMSC-334 Artificial Intelligence

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Artificial Intelligence, as a field, has grown from its humble beginnings in science fiction to become one of the broadest fields in computer science, encompassing an incredibly wide array of topics. One of the common threads between these topics is "How do we build computer systems which exhibit logic and reason?" or rather "How do we build systems which can solve problems intelligently without resorting to brute force?" We'll cover a few major topics in this course, most notably search, logical reasoning, and planning as well as game playing/theory, uncertain reasoning, and graphical models. This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211.

COMSC-335 Machine Learning

Fall. Credits: 4

How does Neflix learn what movies a person likes? How do computers read handwritten addresses on packages, or detect faces in images? Machine learning is the practice of programming computers to learn and improve through experience, and it is becoming pervasive in technology and science. This course will cover the mathematical underpinnings, algorithms, and practices that enable a computer to learn. Topics will include supervised learning, unsupervised learning, evaluation methodology, and Bayesian probabilistic modeling. Students will learn to program in MATLAB or Python and apply course skills to solve real world prediction and pattern recognition problems. Programming Intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Y. Su
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211, MATH-232, and a Calculus course (MATH-101, MATH-102, or MATH-203).
Advisory: Preference will be given to seniors in need of a final 300-level elective.

COMSC-336 Intelligent Information Retrieval

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces the basic concepts, methodologies, and research findings in information retrieval. Special topics include Web searching, cross-language retrieval, data mining, and data extraction. Completion of this course will provide the necessary foundation to work in today's business environment where competitive advantage is obtained by retrieving needed information.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211.

COMSC-341 Topics

COMSC-341CC Topics: 'Compiler Design'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Principles and practices for the design and implementation of compilers and interpreters. Will cover the stages of the compilation and execution process: lexical analysis; parsing; symbol tables; type systems; scope; semantic analysis; intermediate representations; run-time environments and interpreters; code generation; program analysis and optimization; and garbage collection. Students will construct a full compiler.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr
Prereq: COMSC-221 and COMSC-312.
Advisory: Beginning in Fall 2020, this course will also require COMSC-225.

COMSC-341CP Topics: 'Cyber-Physical Systems'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Tired of mixing test tubes by hand, counting ant colonies, or transcribing for hours? Automation and instrumentation advance scientific research, freeing us from tasks that are dirty, dangerous or boring while improving precision and repeatability. Advances in mobile processor design make it easier to add computing-based automation to "dumb" devices. Student teams will create innovative tools for teaching and research, focusing on tools that advance teaching and research around the college and studying embedded computing topics including reliability, testing and qualification, signal processing, real-time systems, collaborative design, and learning rapid prototyping in the Makerspace.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-221.

COMSC-341DC Topics: 'Distributed Systems Engineering'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How does Google respond to search queries so quickly? How does the power grid maintain stability when a tree falls on a wire? Distributed systems solve big problems by facilitating cooperation between independent agents towards a common goal. This course covers major principles of distributed systems: resource contention, concurrent action, scheduling, and communicating. Students will put theory into practice designing, implementing, and debugging distributed systems. This course is programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205.

COMSC-341NL Topics: 'Natural Language Processing'

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar provides an introduction to natural language processing, the discipline of getting computers to understand human language. We will cover core ideas and algorithms relevant to both speech processing and text processing, with emphasis on applications in human-computer natural language interaction. Students will design and complete an open-ended final project.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
H. Pon-Barry
Prereq: COMSC-225 or COMSC-211, MATH-232, and a Calculus course (MATH-101, MATH-102, or MATH-203).

COMSC-341NP Topics: 'Intro to Networking Architecture and Protocols'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to computer networking with a focus on the Internet. At the high level, we will emphasize concepts and principles which have contributed to the Internet's success scaling from its modest beginnings to a system used by over half of the world's population. At the low level, we will survey techniques, technologies and protocols that underlie networks, as well as key protocols built atop these networks. Specific topics include layering, routing, addressing, reliable delivery, congestion control, DNS, HTTP, and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. McCauley
Prereq: COMSC-221 and COMSC-312.

COMSC-341TE Topics: 'Text Technologies for Data Science'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on text analysis and technologies. We look at the challenges of working with massive amounts of unstructured vs semi-structured vs structured data. In that context, we explore some of the ways that statistical analyses are applied to things like search, categorization e.g. spam filtering, recommender systems, plagiarism detection, and hidden message finding.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: COMSC-205 or COMSC-211.

COMSC-343 Programming Language Design and Implementation

Spring. Credits: 4

Ever wonder why there are so many semicolons in Java programs, or what it would mean for a language to not be object-oriented? In this course, we will explore issues related to the design and implementation of programming languages. Along the way, we will discover answers to these questions and more. Topics will include syntax, semantics, runtime support for languages as well as an introduction to functional programming.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr
Prereq: COMSC-225.

COMSC-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

CST-104 Introduction to Media Studies

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the critical study of media, focusing on electronic media, digital technologies, and network cultures. We will analyze the aesthetics, politics, protocols, history, and theory of media, paying attention to the ways they create and erase borders; affect how we form and articulate identities; invade privacy while providing a platform for exploration; foster hate speech and progressive movements alike; and participate in capitalist economies and the acceleration of climate change. While tracing the global flows of media creation, distribution, and consumption, we will also consider the different issues that arise in diverse national and local contexts.

Crosslisted as: FMT-104
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Goodwin

CST-149 Topics in Critical Social Thought

CST-149AD Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Introduction to African Diaspora Religions'

Spring. Credits: 4

Over the last century, religionists have labored to discover the meaning of African dispersal beyond the continent and its accompanying spiritual lineages. What theories of encounter sufficiently adjudicate the synthetic religious cultures of African-descended persons in North America, South America, and the Caribbean? What are the cross-disciplinary methodologies that scholars utilize to understand African religious cultures in the Western hemisphere? Firstly, this course will introduce the field of Africana religious studies. This background will inform the second and primary objective of the course: thematizing and exploring West and Central African religious traditions housed in the Americas.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-181, AFCNA-181
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias

CST-200 Foundations in Critical Social Thought

Spring. Credits: 4

This class introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Critical Social Thought. Students will learn to interrogate and challenge structures of social, cultural, and political power from a variety of theoretical traditions, such as Marxism, critical ethnic studies, queer and gender critique, critical race theory, media studies, performance studies, disability studies, history of science, the Frankfurt school, and settler colonial and postcolonial theory. Developing skills in theoretical and social critique to address pressing social issues, students will be equipped with an interdisciplinary toolbox to pursue independent projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer

CST-248 Science, Revolution, and Modernity

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces critical analysis of science and technology by tracing the historiography of the Scientific Revolution. The significance of this extended intellectual episode has been assessed in radically different ways throughout the intervening centuries. As such, it provides a fertile ground on which to pose and answer important questions about science and its role in society. What does it mean to regard science as 'revolutionary'? How are scientific developments shaped by, and how do they shape, the social, economic, and political worlds in which they are embedded? How is our contemporary understanding of science and technology influenced by the stories we tell about the past?

Crosslisted as: HIST-248
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Cotter

CST-249 Topics in Critical Social Thought

CST-249AN Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Aliens, Anti-Citizens, and Identities'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course will examine marginal and "alien" citizenship statuses in the United States. Whereas the Declaration of Independence asserts that "all men are created equal," we will interrogate that statement by studying identities and personages that are explicitly treated unequally in the law and society. From immigrants to gang members, from tipped workers to queer persons, from presumed terrorists to disenfranchised ex-cons, we will examine the deliberate incorporation and maintenance of people in society into lower classes and statuses.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250AN
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Hernández

CST-249AS Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Necropolitics in the Age of Slavery' 'Necropolitics in the Age of Slavery'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Slave narratives of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries partook of white abolitionist discourse, rhetoric, and genres even as authors made space for their own ideas about freedom, captivity, sovereignty, power, gender, sexuality, and the nature of being. This course will read narratives by Cugoano, Equiano, Sanchez, Prince, Brent, and Craft alongside current critical theories about necropolitics (i.e., sovereignty as the right to kill), Afro-pessimism, Afro-futurism, and Afro- feminism, by theorists such as Mbembe, Wilderson, Moten, Sharpe, and Wynter, to consider what thoughts these authors can offer to us on ways of being, living, and surviving Western, racial imperialisms.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-277
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: No previous theory reading experience is necessary, but a desire to learn to read it.

CST-249BE Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Buddhist Ethics'

Fall. Credits: 4

This is an introduction to contemporary and classical Buddhist ethical ideals. Working with primary and secondary sources, we will ask the following questions: Is the universe moral? What are Buddhist ethical ideals and who embodies these? How do contemporary Buddhists interpret classical ethical ideals? What moral dilemmas do Buddhists face today? How do Buddhists grapple with moral ambiguity? We will consider the perspectives of Buddhists from different cultures including India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam, Japan, and the United States.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-267
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Mrozik

CST-249BW Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Black Women and the Politics of Survival'

Fall. Credits: 4

Contemporary Black women in Africa and the Diaspora are concerned with the sea of economic and political troubles facing their communities, and grappling with how to affirm their own identities while transforming societal notions of gender and family. In this course, we will explore the "intersectionality" of race, gender, sexuality, class, transnational identity; reproductive health; homophobia and heteronormativity, along with the effects of racism, unequal forms of economic development, and globalization on Black communities. The overall aim of this course is to link contemporary Black women's theory and practice to a history and tradition of survival and resistance.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-212BW
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Barnes

CST-249CP Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Trap Doors and Glittering Closets: Queer/Trans* of Color Politics of Recognition, Legibility, Visibility and Aesthetics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204CP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-249CT Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Cognitive Theory and Literary Studies'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A survey of philosophical, scientific, and theoretical approaches to the relation between cognition and representation. For as long as we have told stories, we have thought about how they work in conjunction with the mind. This course charts the many ways in which cognitive theory has shaped literary studies over the ages. How does fiction reflect the way we think? How in turn does it shape how we behave? What happens in the brain and body when we read? Starting in antiquity and working through history towards contemporary neuroscience and cognitive psychology, we will consider such matters as action and imitation; reality and fantasy; reason and imagination; aesthetics, empathy, and affect.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-268
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-249CY Topics in English: 'Cyberpunk in Asia'

Spring. Credits: 4

In popular movies such as Blade Runner and Ghost in the Shell, cyberpunk dystopias have often been associated with Asian cities, neon signs, and crowded bustling streets. What can exploring past and current portrayals of a cyberpunk future tell us about how we view Asia now? What can this aesthetic tell us about corporate dystopias? This course will look at film and texts that interrogate the intersection of race, technology, history, nation, and capital flows. We will read novels such as Pattern Recognition, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, view films such as Blade Runner, and view anime such as Howl's Moving Castle to learn about how historical and economic forces have shaped the way the future is imagined, and why the place of that reckoning resonates with Asia today.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-217CY
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-249DD Topics in Critical Social Thought: ''Diversity, Inclusion, and Daily Democracy in US History'

Fall. Credits: 4

How have Americans -- and those contending with America -- envisioned and reached for more just and inclusive communities? What historical circumstances have opened opportunities for more robust democratic forms to emerge in the face of oppression? We will consider structural barriers to meaningful inclusion, involving racism, wealth, poverty, property, citizenship, gender, sexuality, disability, and dissent, as well as efforts to overcome them through concerted action and cultural struggle in the arts and public humanities. What public stories shape our connections with one another? What can we learn about the possibilities for sustaining democracy through daily life and culture?

Crosslisted as: HIST-280DD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Renda

CST-249EM Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EM, GNDST-204EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

CST-249FA Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Fascism in Plain Sight'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines fascism from a visual perspective. Students learn about the history of the phenomenon through the lenses of cinema, television, and performance. The course begins with an overview of fascism that spans from 1920s Europe to the present. What exactly is fascism? What is its relationship to newly emergent populisms (often called "fascist") and their own emphasis on spectacle? How does fascism visualize race, immigration, gender, sexuality, and violence? The course focuses mainly on fascism's manifestations throughout the Spanish-speaking world. That is, what do Latin America and Spain teach us about its malleability and adaptability?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-240FA, FMT-230FA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: SPAN-212 or fluency in Spanish with permission.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

CST-249FM Special Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Frames of Mind: Tracking Power/Knowledge'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A frame of mind typically refers to a mood or perspective. However, such dispositions also reflect a certain regulation of thought and thus behavior. In other words, something "frames" our minds in the first place. This course explores these ideas by interrogating the history of commonplace assumptions regarding issues such as freedom, race, prison, sexuality, government, and insanity. Authors include Giorgio Agamben, Wendy Brown, Michel Foucault, Friedrich Nietzsche, Edward Said, Ann Laura Stoler, and others.

Crosslisted as: LATAM-287FM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Advisory: The course is geared toward both first-year students with minimal experience with philosophy and other students who have an interest in critical theory.

CST-249FR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Beyond Francafrique: Franco-African Encounters in Historical Perspective'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines how France and Francophone West Africa have shaped each other throughout the past three centuries. Beginning with the French Atlantic of the eighteenth century, the course traces Franco-African encounters through informal and formal colonial rule, decolonization, and the postcolonial period. It closes by examining current controversies over race, literature and museum rights engendered by this complex history. Students will gain a deep historical understanding of contemporary issues, giving them the capacity to think widely about social divisions, power asymmetries, and debates surrounding identity and belonging that de-center the American experience.

Crosslisted as: HIST-241, AFCNA-241FR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Prosperetti

CST-249HE Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'History of Energy'

Spring. Credits: 4

We live in an age of energy crises, in which the future of energy is questioned in countless headlines and Twitter feeds. These concerns often include other assumptions about energy's past, in particular the idea that social change invariably follows the discovery of new energy technologies. From food to fuel cells, this colloquium charts a more complicated and interesting history, a history in which people have continually shaped and made meaningful the energies that fuel the modern world.

Crosslisted as: HIST-277
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon
Prereq: 4 credits in history.
Advisory: This course will be of particular interest to students in history and environmental studies and to those interested in the social study of science and technology.

CST-249JM Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Jewish Modernities'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines key themes in Jewish intellectual, religious, and political life from the late 17th century to the present. We examine: the effect of civil emancipation and the Enlightenment on Jewish philosophy and theology; Jews as both architects of modern thought and the paradigmatic Other in European liberal nation-states; the transformation of traditional Jewish religious rituals and belief systems in response to dramatic social and political life; new patterns of gender and family organization; the effect of antisemitism, Zionism, and imperialism on Jewish politics; and contemporary Jewish intellectual innovation, including feminist and queer thought.

Crosslisted as: JWST-269, RELIG-269
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Benjamin

CST-249LR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Latina/o/x Urbanism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the relationship between the urban and Latina/o/x placemaking, identities and culture(s). Urban scholars have long studied the "evolving" city-this course explores the changing city in relation to Latina/o/x populations and urban social change movements. We examine historical and contemporary conditions and cover a broad range of topics including: urbanization, urban planning, "new urbanism," placemaking, gentrification, migration/immigration, segregation, and more. The readings in this course aim to provoke a consideration of the dynamic between space and place, as well as how urban life, culture, and form impacts Latina/o/x populations and vice versa.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250LR
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
V. Rosa

CST-249NR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Reimagining American Religious History: Race, Gender, and Alterity'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course invites its participants to place critical race and gender studies perspectives in dialogue with the emergence of new religious movements in the United States. Course participants rely on the presupposition that only through a thorough examination of religious traditions on the 'margin' can we fully understand the textured meaning of American religious history as a sub-discipline. Privileging the founding stories and institutionalization of minoritized American religious groups, the course considers how subaltern voices have shaped and transformed American religious life.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-225NR, GNDST-210NR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Coleman-Tobias

CST-249NT Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Black, Jewish, and Muslim Cultures in Germany: Intersectionalities of Othering'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

As much as German culture is riddled with extreme examples of persecution and nationalism, the presence of those deemed non-German, such as Black Africans, African Americans, Jews, and Muslims, shaped cultural expression and cultural exchange. In this seminar we explore the expression of otherness as portrayed in literature, film, and art from the eighteenth through twenty-first Centuries. Drawing from critical race theory, critical ethnic studies, and gender studies, we consider work by non-Germans as well as the representation of others in German canonical and popular cultural production.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231NT, JWST-225NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

CST-249RP Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Race, Racism, and Power'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to think rigorously about social inequality, resistance and liberation.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250RP, GNDST-204RP
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Arce
Restrictions: This course is limited to sophomores and juniors.

CST-249SL Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Women and Gender in Islam'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine a range of ways in which Islam has constructed women--and women have constructed Islam. We will study concepts of gender as they are reflected in classical Islamic texts, as well as different aspects of the social, economic, political, and ritual lives of women in various Islamic societies.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-207, GNDST-210SL
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Steinfels

CST-249TJ Topics in Critical Social Thought: Culture: 'Transforming Justice and Practicing Truth to Power: Critical Methodologies and Methods in Community Participatory Action Research and Accountability'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR), Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center on questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204TJ
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-249TR Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate knowledge/cultural production produced by trans* communities, particularly those multiply impacted by categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, citizenship and location. To understand the critical feminist genealogy/insurgency in which transgender studies/activism have become a field/site of political discourse, we will explore the overlaps and tensions between women/queer/trans* of color activism and theory. Using experimental and multimedia archives of affect, grief, desire, love, liberation and identitarian contradictions, we will ask how counter genealogies as process can transform how we relate to and inhabit power, futurity and memory.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204TR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 4 credits from Gender Studies.

CST-249WT Topics in Critical Social Thought: 'Sociology of 9/11 and the War on Terror'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will explore the cultural and political impact of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The media's role in constructing meanings will be a main organizing focus of the course. Using readings, discussions, assignments, and films, the course will allow students to form a picture of how 9/11 changed America and beyond. Course topics include: the way the mainstream media constructed 9/11 and alternate ways they could have; how popular culture and the Public Sphere responded; complex historical factors leading up to 9/11; reasons the attackers say they committed the attacks; ways the event changed culture and politics in the world; conspiracy theories.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Michaud Wild
Prereq: SOCI-123.

CST-253 Critical Race Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

This course examines the discursive relationship between race and law in contemporary U.S. society. Readings examine the ways in which racial bodies are constituted in the cultural and political economy of American society. The main objective is to explore the rules and social practices that govern the relationship of race to gender, nationality, sexuality, and class in U.S. courts and other cultural institutions. Thinkers covered include W.E.B. DuBois, Kimberle Crenshaw, Derrick Bell, and Richard Delgado, among others.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-208
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Critical Social Thought 248, 249,or 250 recommended but not required

CST-280 Literary and Cultural Theory

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to literary and cultural theory with an emphasis on twentieth century and contemporary thought. We will focus on crucial questions that have focused, and continue to focus, critical debate. These questions may include representation, subjectivity, ideology, identity, difference, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout we will be particularly interested in the ways in which language and form mediate and construct social experience.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-280
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

CST-342 Science as Culture

Fall. Credits: 4

What is science? The progressive discovery of Nature's laws? The process of honing claims about the universe? Is science the act of postulating and testing hypotheses? Or is it tinkering, experimentation? This course offers an advanced introduction to cultural and anthropological studies of science. Through careful readings of work in areas such as the sociology of scientific knowledge, actor-network theory, feminist science studies, and affect theory, we will explore the sciences as complex systems of cultural production. The course will culminate in a series of critical ethnographic studies of how the sciences shape concepts and experiences of race, the body, gender, and sexuality.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-342
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Watson
Prereq: 8 credits in the department.

CST-346 Irish Gothic

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this seminar, we will study the gothic as a malleable yet persistent discursive site in Irish literary and political tradition. From the eighteenth century to the present, the gothic has been used to represent and to imagine aspects of Irish history, in particular colonialism and its traumas, in literature. The course focuses on the ways that the Irish gothic explores violence and terror, famine, and vampirism as a political metaphor. We will read novels, short fiction, poetry, and archival newspaper writing, including work by Maturin, Owenson, Lady Wilde, Mangan, LeFanu, Stoker, Joyce, Bowen, Boland, Edna O'Brien, and Heaney.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-346
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: 4 credits in English at the 300 level.

CST-349 Advanced Topics

CST-349AC Advanced Topics: 'Latina/o/x Studies in Action'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Latina/o/x Studies in Action explores university/college-community partnerships and civic engagement with/in Latina/o/x communities in the United States. Drawing from the field of Latina/o/x Studies, the course explores and interrogates "traditional" academic understandings of knowledge production, research, and service learning. Focusing on questions of power, inequality, and social change, this course will examine how university/college-community partnerships can be based on reciprocity, exchange, and the centering of community assets, needs, and voices.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350AC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
V. Rosa

CST-349AD Advanced Topics: 'Abolitionist Dreams & Everyday Resistance: Freedom Memoirs, Struggles, and Decolonizing Justice'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will offer close theoretical readings of a variety of anti-colonial, abolitionist, anti-imperialist, insurgent and feminist-of-color memoir, autobiographical and social justice texts. We will read works from Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Assata Shakur, Patrisse Cullors, Grace Lee Boggs, Audre Lorde, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarsinna, Leila Khaled, Fannie Lou Hamer, Sarah Ahmed, Lee Maracle, Kai Cheng Thom, Angela Davis, Sojourner Truth, adrienne maree brown, Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Mary Brave Bird, Jamaica Kincaid, Gabby Rivera and Haunani-Kay Trask. We will center the interlinking and capacious concepts of liberation, revolution, freedom, justice and decolonization.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333AD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought at the 200 level or above.

CST-349AF Advanced Topics: 'African American Spiritualities of Dissent'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course seeks to understand how protest fuels the creation and sustenance of black religious movements and novel spiritual systems in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine the dissentive qualities of selected African American activists, community workers, scholars, spiritual/religious leaders and creative writers. By the end of this course, students will be able to thoughtfully respond to the questions, "What is spirituality?"; "What is dissent?"; and "Has blackness required resistive spiritual communities?

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331AF, AFCNA-341AF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Coleman-Tobias

CST-349AN Advanced Topics: 'Love, Sex, and Death in the Anthropocene, or Living Through the Age of Climate Change and Other Disasters'

Fall. Credits: 4

The "Anthropocene" has been defined as the era when humans exert change on the earth's climate, but this term has become a dynamo for theories, political discussions, and art about man's anthropocentric relation to the nonhuman world. This course will read theories of the Anthropocene alongside artistic contemplations of the shifting, ethical relations among humans, animals, and other beings of the world. How are we to live, die, and reproduce ourselves in a time when we have egregiously affected the earth? How does the critique of anthropocentrism shift our understanding of sex, gender, race, and the nonhuman? Finally, how does art speak within political conversations of climate change?

Crosslisted as: ENGL-366, GNDST-333AN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Singer
Prereq: 8 credits in English or Critical Social Thought.

CST-349AR Advanced Topics: 'Aesthetics of Racial Capitalism'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Race is the modality in which class is lived," wrote the late cultural theorist Stuart Hall. This course takes Hall's axiom as a starting point for considering the racial, gendered, and sexualized character of capitalist domination. Throughout the course students will explore both the political economy and the cultural imaginary of racial capitalism. One question we will grapple with is the following: if capital itself is as imperceptible and objectively real as gravity, what are the common tropes we use to apprehend its circulation? Is it the stock market ticker tape, the shipping container, or the industrial wasteland? Drawing on writers and artists of color from around the world, we will consider ways they offer cognitive maps of the gendered and sexualized contours of racial capitalism. Authors may include Octavia Butler, Chang-rae Lee, Leslie Marmon Silko, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, and Ruth Ozeki. Visual artists may include Xu Bing, Otobong Nkanga, Allan deSouza, Rodney McMillian, Mark Bradford, Takahiro Iwasaki, Anicka Yi, and Candace Lin.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-338
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Prereq: 8 credits in English or CST-200.

CST-349BC Advanced Topics: 'History of British Capitalism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a research seminar, designed to introduce students to classic and recent debates on the "history of capitalism" and to support original research on a broad array of topics related to the social and cultural history of economic life. Rather than take British capitalism as exemplary of modernization we will situate that which was particular about the British case against the pluralities of capitalism that have evolved over the past three centuries. Topics include revolutions in agriculture, finance, commerce and manufacturing; the political economy of empire; the relationship between economic ideas, institutions and practice; and, the shaping of economic life by gender, class and race.

Crosslisted as: HIST-357, EOS-349BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

CST-349BF Advanced Topics: 'Foundations in Black Feminist Thought'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers a foundational investigation of African-American and other African descendant women's contributions to feminist theory as a heterogeneous field of knowledge encompassing multiple streams of gender- and race-cognizant articulation and praxis. While Black feminism's historical development will be sketched, our focus will be on the literature and theory of writers like Alice Walker, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, bell hooks, and Barbara Smith. We explore these and other foundational texts as representatives of the contexts within which Black Women's Studies emerged along with various subaltern feminisms mobilized by other women of color in the Global North and South.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333BF
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Barnes
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies, Critical Social Thought, Africana Studies, Anthropology, or Sociology.

CST-349BG Advanced Topics: ''Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines contemporary Asian American film and visual culture through the lens of cultural recovery, self-invention, and experimentation. Focusing primarily on film and photography, we will explore issues of race and visuality, Hollywood orientalism, memory and postmemory, and racial impersonation and parody. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. Artists may include Nikki S. Lee, Margaret Cho, Tseng Kwong Chi, Jin-me Yoon, Justin Lin, Binh Dahn, Richard Fung, Mira Nair, Deepa Mehta, and Alice Wu.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-334BG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.

CST-349CF Advanced Topics: 'Survived, Punished and (Un)Deserving: Feminist Participatory Action Research Against Carceral Feminisms'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will consider the critical intervention of #SurvivedAndPunished, and the idea of "survivor defense as abolitionist praxis." Using principles and case studies from feminist and critical race action research, we will investigate the concepts of transformative justice, carceral feminism and anti-violence alongside the binaries of deserving/undeserving and good-victim/non-victim criminal. How does this relate to the corrective notions of rehabilitation, redemption and restitution? What does the criminalization of survivors of violence (i.e., gendered, racial, intimate partner, sexual and state violence) tell us about our limited views of justice and collective healing from harm?

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333CF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought at the 200 level or above.

CST-349CH Advanced Topics: 'Childhood and Children in Religion'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores a diversity of religious approaches to the meaning of childhood and the nature of children. We critically examine influential writings, rituals and liturgy, fiction, and other types of literature to understand the construction of childhood as distinctive life stage that entails special rights and responsibilities. We will also examine how gender, power, race, social structures, and economic arrangements produce divergent understandings of what it means to be a child.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-331CH, JWST-350CH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Benjamin
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: Students wishing to take this course for credit in Jewish studies must choose a research topic that builds on Jewish sources.

CST-349DE Advanced Topics: 'Rethinking (Under)Development in Latin America'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

When and how did the notion of "development" emerge and spread? Why does nearly every country now aspire to it? What stigmas and hierarchies does the term "under-development" imply? Throughout Latin America, such language proves problematic not only as a material reality but also as a framework for understanding place, time, and selfhood. In this course, students rethink conventional wisdom about "underdevelopment" through the study of writers, filmmakers, and painters from Latin America working at different historical junctures of the twentieth century. The course addresses works by Gabriel García Márquez, Subcomandante Marcos, José Martí, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, and others.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-350DE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: Two 200-level Spanish courses above SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

CST-349EM Advanced Topics: 'Flesh and Blood: Naturecultural Embodiments'

Spring. Credits: 4

What does it mean to be (in?) a body? Who counts as whole, broken or food? How do discipline, punishment, use, reproduction, and illness come into play? What are agency, animacy, knowledge, consciousness in relation to embodiment? Western rationality has produced and disciplined a coherent, bounded, defended, racialized, and gendered bodily Self through medicine, psychiatry, nutrition, education, sexology, thanatology, obstetrics, and other disciplines. We will explore this production and its continual undoing, through topics such as medical diagnosis, disability, death and burial cultures, infection, diet, breastfeeding and dairy, chronic illness, depression, queerness, and hormone replacement.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: GNDST-101 and GNDST-221 or GNDST-201, or CST-200 or CST-248, or 8 credits in Anthropology, Sociology, History, Environmental Studies or Geography.

CST-349FM Advanced Topics: 'Latina Feminism(s)'

Fall. Credits: 4

What is Latina Feminism? How does it differ from and/or intersect with "other" feminisms? In this seminar, we will explore the relationship between Latina feminist theory, knowledge production, and social change in the United States. This interdisciplinary course explores Latina feminism in relation to methodology and epistemology through a historical lens. This will help us to better understand how Latina feminist approaches can inform our research questions, allow us to analyze women's experiences and women's history, and challenge patriarchy and gender inequality. We will explore topics related to knowledge production, philosophies of the "self," positionality, inequality, the body, reproductive justice, representation, and community. Our approach in this class will employ an intersectional approach to feminist theory that understands the interconnectedness between multiple forms of oppression, including race, class, sexuality, and ability. Our goal is to develop a robust understanding of how Latina feminist methodologies and epistemologies can be tools for social change.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350FM, GNDST-333FM
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Madrigal
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-349HD Advanced Topics: 'Disposable People: A History of Deportation'

Spring. Credits: 4

Taught in English, the course explores comparative racial and ethnic politics in the U.S. during the 20th century. We will analyze the creation and maintenance of structural inequalities through laws and policies targeted at persons of color in the areas of healthcare, transportation, immigration, labor, racial segregation, and education. Through readings, lectures and films, we will discuss critical histories of community struggle against social inequality, registering the central impact that race, class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship have had on efforts toward social justice.

Crosslisted as: LATST-365
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Hernández

CST-349LD Advanced Topics: 'Luminous Darkness: African American Social Thought After DuBois'

Spring. Credits: 4

Examines the causes of and proposed solutions to 'the Negro problem' in post-Civil War American social thought and public policy. Begins with the life, work, and legacies of DuBois. Drawing on domestic and diasporic fictional and nonfictional depictions of black life in the 'DuBoisian century' the course considers different responses to his 1903 question, 'How does it feel to be a problem?' The course examines the development and contemporary status of black modernity and postmodernity in the writings of Robinson, Smith, Davis, Ransby, YamahttaTaylor, and others. Our focus on DuBoisian thought culminates in a careful examination of the emergence of racial capitalism in the 21st century.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-308
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Africana Studies.

CST-349MC Advanced Topics: 'Latinas/os/x and Housing: Mi Casa Is Not Su Casa'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Housing is closely tied to quality of life and the health of neighborhoods and communities. As a main goal of the "American Dream," homeownership has important significance on an individual and societal level. For immigrants, this goal is often out of reach as a result of racism and discriminatory housing policies. This interdisciplinary seminar explores Latinas/os/x relationship to housing and homeownership by examining: 1. the history of housing policy in the United States; 2. national identity, assimilation, and housing; and 3. discriminatory housing policies/programs and housing inequality. We explore topics including immigration, housing policy, public housing, segregation, gentrification, the suburbs, homelessness, eviction, affordability, and community building. Exploring this range of topics will help us develop a clearer understanding of why housing is one of the most pressing issues for Latinas/os/x today. Students will engage in community- based research on affordable housing in communities in the Pioneer Valley.

Crosslisted as: LATST-350MC, GNDST-333MC
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive
V. Rosa
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: This course will be linked with Professor Preston Smith's Social Housing course (POLIT-254). Students from both courses will share a classroom for speakers and films.

CST-349MR Advanced Topics: 'The Medieval Mirror: Freedom, Gender and Resistance in Contemporary Arabic Literature'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Setting their historical novels in the Middle Ages, contemporary Arab writers such as Radwa Ashour, Jurjy Zaydan, Gamal al-Ghitani and Bensalem Himmich have reflected into the past the problems of present Middle-Eastern societies. Writing from Egypt, Lebanon and Morocco, they revisited with nostalgia the extraordinary medieval heritage of the Arab-Islamic world, educating their readers while taking them on journeys to Medieval Andalusia, to the last years of the Baghdad of the caliphs, and to Cairo on eve of the Ottoman conquest. By looking into the medieval mirror, these authors challenged conservative readings of this heritage. In doing so, they contributed to the modernization of their countries and were able to escape censorship, uphold feminist values, and to criticize Western imperialism and oppressive Arab rulers. In this course, we will read their works in valuable English translations, while discussing their extraordinary lives as twentieth-century writers, intellectuals, and activists.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-339
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Lovato
Notes: Taught in English. A special Arabic track will be available for upper-intermediate, advanced, and native students of Arabic.

CST-349MS Advanced Topics: 'Multi-Species Justice? Entangled Lives and Human Power'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How can we change animal exploitation and re-situate the human more equitably with other species? Through animal rights? Justice? Abolition? Dismantle human exceptionalism? Animal emancipation? Companionship? Co-existence? Stewardship? What are the uses and limits of the discourses from which critical animal studies borrows conceptually, for example: antiracism, feminism, disability studies, nationalism, transformative justice, and so on. We will explore different scenarios of human-nonhuman entanglements, such as training, rescue, the animal industrial complex, the politics of extinction, hunting, infection, predation, breeding/reproduction and others.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333MS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Gundermann

CST-349NC Advanced Topics: 'Revolution and Change in the Age of Necropolitics'

Spring. Credits: 4

The "age of revolution" saw revolts in the Black Atlantic world: Americans rebelled against the British; Native Americans opposed white colonists; bourgeoisie vied for power against the aristocracy; women decried patriarchal imprisonment; Latin American creoles resisted Spanish imperialists; and slaves threw off their masters. This course considers these diverse narratives of revolution as a series of social, political, and philosophical movements to change "biopolitics" (control of life) and "necropolitics" (control via death). We will read revolutionary tracts, slave narratives, and abolitionary literature alongside critical theory to consider how these authors offer ways of living and surviving Western, racial imperialisms.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-389
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits combined in English, critical social thought, history, or Africana studies.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

CST-349NT Advanced Topics: 'Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment And Survival'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Sexuality via current US law is largely conceived of as a singular identity axis, existing independently of other categories and social phenomena. Through critical queer, critical race and settler colonial theory, this course will study the concepts of sexual citizenship/respectability in relation to criminality of "deviant" sexualized, racialized, colonized bodies. In turn, we will explore recent modes of LGBT legal reform -- or rather "carceral feminisms" and "pink-washing." Lastly, we will focus on the unprecedented rate in which women/queer/trans people of color experience violence from the criminal justice system and its law enforcers, even in cases of survival and self-defense.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333NT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits from Gender Studies.

CST-349PA Advanced Topics: 'Natural's Not in It: Pedro Almodóvar'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333PA, SPAN-340PA, FMT-330PA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: 8 credits in Spanish, Film Studies, Critical Social Thought, and/or Gender Studies.
Notes: Weekly evening screenings. Taught in English.

CST-349PW Advanced Topics: 'Once More With Feeling: Intimacies and Affects in a Posthuman World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Affect theory offers a varied and rich critical language to explore how emotion circulates within and among human bodies-and nonhuman ones as well. If emotions operate through bodily changes and chemical exchanges, then animals and nonhumans might similarly be seen as bodies replete with affective materials in motion and at rest. In this course we will read through an array of affect theory from cognitive science, animal studies, and posthumanist debates on the affect of objects. We will consider how humans know what they feel (and when), how animals love, how forests think, and how affects might cross human and nonhuman boundaries.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-382PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Prior experience with theory is helpful but not necessary.

CST-349RE Advanced Topics: 'Body and Gender in Religious Traditions'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Do bodies matter in religious traditions? Whose bodies matter? How do they matter? By studying religious body ideals and practices, we examine the possibilities and problems different kinds of bodies have posed in religious traditions. Topics include religious diet, exercise, and dress; monasticism, celibacy, and sexuality; healing rituals, and slavery and violence. We pay special attention to contemporary challenges to problematic body ideals and practices coming from feminist, disability, postcolonial, queer, and trans theorists and activists.

Crosslisted as: RELIG-352, GNDST-333RT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Mrozik
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

CST-349ST Advanced Topics: 'Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinities, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate the racialization of masculinity (and the masculinization of race) as undergirded by heteropatriarchy, settler colonialism, militarized borders and imperialism. This course will center perspectives from various "Third World Solidarity" diasporas in order to challenge Western, hegemonic and inherent legacies of masculinity as modernity's (hu)man. Using critical race theory, feminist, queer/trans* of color critique (e.g., Wynter, Fanon, David Eng, José Muñoz), we will ask how whiteness (white supremacist masculinity) shapes and colors masculinity -- whether as exemplar, visible, illegible, failed, deviant and even toxic -- and what then falls outside of such a frame?

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
R. Hwang
Prereq: 8 credits in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

CST-349SV Advanced Topics: 'Media and Surveillance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With corporations using our data to anticipate our desires and counterterrorism units tapping into our communications, we are increasingly embedded in a surveillance society. This course considers practices of surveillance across media platforms, from smartphones, fitness trackers, and baby monitors to the biometric technologies that determine who may cross borders. We will explore how different governments, corporations, and individuals use new media to surveil others, as well as the ways racism and transphobia are inscribed in surveillance practices. We will also discuss and try out protective measures and various subversive practices of "sousveillance.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330SV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Goodwin
Prereq: One of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

CST-349UU Advanced Topics: 'Latina/o Immigration'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course provides an historical and topical overview of Latina/o migration to the United States. We will examine the economic, political, and social antecedents to Latin American migration, and the historical impact of the migration process in the U.S. Considering migration from Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, we will discuss the social construction of race, the gendered nature of migration, migrant labor struggles, Latin American-U.S. Latino relations, immigration policy, and border life and enforcement. Notions of citizenship, race, class, gender, and sexuality will be central to our understanding of the complexity at work in the migration process.

Crosslisted as: LATST-360, GNDST-333UU
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
R. Madrigal
Notes: Community-based learning is optional in this class.

CST-349VC Advanced Topics: 'Victorian Literature and Visual Culture'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine literary texts that represent new forms of visuality in nineteenth-century Britain as well as examples of visual culture that provide a framework for reading Victorian culture in innovative ways. We will study nineteenth-century photography--portraiture, prison photography, imperial photographs, and private and popular erotic images--as well as novels and autobiographical writing that engage with new photographic technology and its transformation of the ways in which Victorians understood identity, politics, aesthetics, and representation. The course will take a similar approach to painting, literary illustration, political cartoons and caricature, and advertising.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-325
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: ENGL-220 or ENGL-323 and at least 4 credits from art history or film studies.

CST-350 Senior Seminar

Fall. Credits: 4

This capstone course brings seniors together to think through relationships among empirical research, theory, activism, and practice in gender studies and critical social thought. Majors with diverse interests, perspectives, and expertise will have the opportunity to reflect on, and share with each other, the significance of their major education in relation to their current and past work, their capstone or senior projects, their academic studies as a whole, and their engagements outside of academia. Course readings and discussion will be shaped by students in collaboration with the instructor.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-392
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
C. Gundermann
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.; This course is limited to CST or Gender Studies majors.

CST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

CUSP-105 Speaking from Experience

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Especially designed for students interested in developing their public speaking skills (or pitching) within entrepreneurial settings, this speaking-intensive two-credit course will help students reflect on, learn from, and speak about their unique experiences as they transition into their next steps after graduation. Using techniques that are effective to focus their message and connect with their audience, students will improve their ability to communicate with confidence, express themselves authentically and inspire others. Students will practice and revise their pitches with different contexts and audiences in mind, and learn more about ways that such spoken presentations are evaluated.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Feldman
Notes: Half-semester course. Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-134 Effective Writing, Revising, And Communication

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course is intended for students who are new to American academic writing or identify as non-native speakers of English. Students should also be enrolled in a writing-intensive course. Through discussion and analysis of their own writing and peer work, students evaluate the effectiveness of their written communication and writing process. A variety of strategies for strengthening written communication are applied to current writing projects. Planned topics include incorporating and citing sources, English structure and vocabulary, writing to an audience, constructing effective paragraphs, and drafting and revision.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Shea
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Credit/no credit grading. Meets second half of the semester only. Remember, there is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-136 Language and Culture in Academia

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Language and culture are inextricably linked. Learning a language also means learning a new culture. Academia has a culture all its own, in addition to that of the country and language of a particular institution. This course will explore the values and practices of college education in the United States. Through readings and class discussion, students will develop a framework for understanding the implicit cultural expectations in writing assignments, class discussion, and other aspects of academic life.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Zhu
Advisory: This course is open to all students, but is particularly relevant to international students.
Notes: Credit/no credit grading. Remember, there is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-202 Community-Based Learning: Networks, Reflection, and Meaning

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Community-based learning that effectively develops civic leaders and engages purposefully in community development requires students to develop networking, reflection, and analytic practices. Readings on civic engagement, discussions and exercises will advance campus and community networks, writing and oral reflection on field experiences, and information-sharing so students will better understand themselves and communities. This course is designed to facilitate learning and impact for CBL Program student staff pursuing concurrent fellowships and mentorships. Students in C.A.U.S.E. leadership, off-campus work-study, and independent study positions may also enroll by permission.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
The department
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: For current CBL Fellows only. Instructor permission required.
Notes: Meets Wednesday nights. There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-203 Integrating Learning, Service, and Social Action

Spring. Credits: 2

Community-based learning (CBL) is a central aspect of the liberal arts curriculum -- as it facilitates student learning outside the College gates with community partners in ways that can effect social change. Such learning requires self-reflective practices, project planning and assessment, and knowledge of local histories. Through course readings, discussion, and community visitors, this class is designed to facilitate community-based learning for CBL student staff, C.A.U.S.E. leadership, student interns or future interns, as well as any student with a general interest in CBL.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
D. Hernández
Notes: Remember, there is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-208 Fundamentals of Maker Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is an introduction to common shop practices in the MHC Makerspace. In this course, you will learn to safely operate equipment and to both develop and mentor projects, with a focus on inclusive pedagogy. Emphasis will be placed on class participation as well as hands-on project based assignments. Priority will be given to those seeking to work as Makerspace Consultants.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
K. Aidala
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-209 Making Study Abroad a Transformative Experience

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course prepares students for a profoundly transformative study abroad experience, personally and intellectually. We explore ways to engage cultural difference rather than shy away from it and be comfortable with being outside one's comfort zone. Students will learn critical reflection strategies and discuss how study abroad supports their individual learning goals and advances their personal growth and career prospects. Classes include case studies, role play, and conversations with faculty and alumnae with study abroad experience.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Lauer, M. Svaldi
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Course is limited to students who plan to study abroad in spring 2020.
Notes: Second half of semester. Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-212 Peer Mentoring: Theory and Practice

Spring. Credits: 2

This course is an introduction to theories and practices of collaborative learning for students preparing to work as mentors in the Speaking, Arguing, and Writing Program (SAW). We will draw on existing research, practice sessions, class discussion, and our own writing and speaking to craft our philosophies of peer mentoring and to develop effective practical strategies.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Singer
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Meets second half of the semester on Monday evenings. Remember, there is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-215 Intergroup Dialogue

CUSP-215RR Intergroup Dialogue: 'Understanding Race and Racism in the United States and Mount Holyoke College'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1

In a culturally and socially diverse society, discussion about issues of difference, conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social/cultural groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will actively participate in two days (16 hours) of semi-structured, face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. Students will learn from each others' perspectives, read and discuss relevant reading material, and explore their own and other groups' experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Students will also explore ways of taking action to create change and bridge differences at the interpersonal and social/community levels.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Keehn
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Interested students must complete an online application. Fall application, Spring application.
Notes: Students may take this weekend dialogue experience for 1 academic credit or may participate without registration as a co-curricular opportunity. In addition to the weekend meetings, there are reflection papers to be completed before and after the dialogue. Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation. If students are unable to make the orientation meeting, they can set up an alternative meeting time with the instructor.

CUSP-235 Intergroup Dialogue: Facilitating Conversations About Social Justice

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Intergroup Dialogue engages individuals and groups in facilitated small group processes to explore difficult issues to develop shared meaning across lines of difference, and generate opportunities for collaborative action. This course is designed to give students both a theoretical and practical foundation in the awareness, knowledge and skills needed to effectively plan, facilitate and evaluate Intergroup Dialogues. Students will develop skills in facilitating multicultural group interactions and work with conflict that may emerge engaging topics such as group dynamics, conflict intervention, intergroup communication and group building

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Keehn
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: CUSP-215RR.
Advisory: Students must have completed CUSP-215RR or a comparable intergroup dialogue experience from another institution and must complete the required Fall application form or Spring application.
Notes: Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

CUSP-241 Engaging for Social Impact: Working With Local Communities Around the World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course prepares students for learning and engagement in community-based settings locally and abroad -- through international internships, Community-Based Learning and/or the Global/Local Fellowship. Effective and ethical work with communities requires students to better understand the contexts of, and possible modes for, collaborative action. Students will engage crucial questions, including their motivations and positionality as change agents, histories of social inequality and attempts to address them (e.g., through development, social justice), how "community" is variously defined. This course will use a combination of course discussion, personal reflection and community-based trips.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
The department
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Note: There is a 12-credit limit on curricular support and non-liberal arts courses that may be counted towards the 128 credits required for graduation.

DANCE-113 Beginning Modern

Fall. Credits: 2

An introduction to the basic principles of dance movement: body alignment, coordination, strength and flexibility, basic forms of locomotion. No previous dance experience required.

B. Diewald, C. Martin, F. Wolfzahn
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-114 Advanced Beginning Modern

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course introduces aligned and efficient dancing through the study of contemporary modern dance technique and principles. Students will build capacity for physical endurance and active presence as well as a deepening awareness of rhythm and anatomy. Each class will begin with a warm up, continue with exercises that move across the room, and build to longer combinations.

B. Diewald
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-119 Contact Improvisation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Contact improvisation is a duet movement form that explores communicating through the language of touch, momentum, and weight. Classes will develop simple solo and duet skills - rolling, falling, balance, counterbalance, jumping, weight sharing, and spirals.

F. Wolfzahn
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-120 Beginning Ballet

Spring. Credits: 2

Students will study the basic movements and fundamentals of classical ballet. The movements are taught in a pure form, at a relaxed pace before proceeding to more complex combinations. Ballet I sets the groundwork for the movements and musicality of the ballet lesson.

R. Flachs
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-121 Advanced Beginning Ballet

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

A continuation of the knowledge gained in Ballet I. The course will emphasize maintaining correct body placement, coordination of the arms and head while using the whole body for dance. Curriculum covered will include the small and big classical poses and an increase in the allegro portion of the class.

R. Flachs
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-127 Renaissance and Baroque Dance I

Fall. Credits: 1

Sixteenth- through eighteenth-century European social dance, contemporary with the eras of Elizabeth I and Shakespeare in England, the Medicis in Italy, Louis XIV in France, and colonial America. The focus will be on learning the dances, supplemented by historical and social background, discussion of the original dance sources, and reconstruction techniques.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-147D
N. Monahin, M. Pash
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-128 Renaissance and Baroque Dance II

Spring. Credits: 1

Continuation of Renaissance and Baroque Dance I. Sixteenth- through eighteenth-century European social dance, contemporary with the eras of Elizabeth I and Shakespeare in England, the Medicis in Italy, Louis XIV in France, and colonial America. The focus will be on learning the dances, supplemented by historical and social background, discussion of the original dance sources, and reconstruction techniques.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-147F
N. Monahin, M. Pash
Prereq: DANCE-127 or MUSIC-147D.

DANCE-132 Introduction to Hip Hop

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This class will introduce students to the basic elements of various styles of hip-hop dance including breaking, popping, locking, and contemporary music video style. Each class will start with a warm-up focusing on hip-hop fundamentals and conclude with a short combination fusing these diverse styles together. In addition, students will learn the history of hip-hop-Rs four elements: breaking, MCing, DJing, and graffiti.

S. Johnson
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-141 West African Drumming for Dance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

Using authentic African drums, students will learn to play the various rhythms that accompany the dances taught in the West African dance class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Notes: Repeatable for credit. No PE units. Drums will be provided by the instructor. Drummers are encouraged to play for the DANCE-142 class following this class, if they are they are not also enrolled in it.

DANCE-142 West African Dance

Spring. Credits: 2

The objectives of the course are for students to understand the profound influence African dance has had on American dance forms, to understand the significance of dance in African culture, and to understand the connection between drummer and dancer and to appreciate and respect a culture that is different yet similar in many ways to American culture.

N. Escobar
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-144 Tango

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Argentine Tango is the sensual and elegant social dance of the city of Buenos Aires, which is experiencing a worldwide revival. Cuban Salsa Rueda is a unique Salsa Game developed in Havana, Cuba. Class will include the steps, the history, and anecdotes about the culture of tango and salsa. We will cover traditional and modern forms. All dancers will learn lead and follow, so you do not need a partner. Wear leather-soled shoes or bring socks.

D. Trenner
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-151 Elementary Composition

Fall. Credits: 4

A study of the principles and elements of choreography. How is movement design and meaning constructed? How do the different dimensions of the medium of dance inform and inspire choreographic choices? Course work will focus on experiential and analytical approaches to these questions through readings, video viewings and guided improvisational and compositional explorations of such issues as sensation, time, rhythm, desire, image, shape, space, and effort quality. Students will experiment with a range of tools and strategies for dance making, including movement phrasing, musical structure , collage, group forms, improvisational scoring, and the design of movement in relation to objects and environments.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Martin

DANCE-171 Studies in Dance History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to present an overview of dance as a performing art in the twentieth century. Through readings, video and film viewings, guest performances, individual research projects, and classroom discussions, students will explore principles and traditions of twentieth-century concert dance traditions, with special attention to their historical and cultural contexts. Special topics may include European and American ballet, the modern dance movement, contemporary and avant-garde experimentation, African American dance forms, jazz dance, and other cultural dance traditions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Escobar
Notes: In spring 2020, the focus will be on African American dance forms and artists.

DANCE-177 Introduction to Caribbean Dance Studies

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How does Caribbean dance mobilize identity, history, and community? This course will introduce students to the study of Caribbean dance forms through regular reading, writing, viewing, and dance practice, as well as guest artist visits. We will explore a diversity of Caribbean dance practices from Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Puerto Rico, paying particular attention to race, gender and sexuality in our analyses.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Chapman

DANCE-216 Intermediate Modern

DANCE-216MA Intermediate Modern 2x/week

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is a continued practice of modern dance. Physically, the emphasis is on aligned, articulate and efficient dancing through modern dance technique and principles. Students will build capacity for physical endurance and active presence as well as a deepening awareness of the body's potential. Course work will include improvisation, moving into and out of the floor, shifting the centers of gravity, and finding agility and clarity in movement and thought.

F. Pergelly
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-216MB Intermediate Modern 1x/week

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Intermediate and Advanced study in modern technique focuses on body level issues of strength, support, alignment, articulation, initiation and performance issues of rhythmic and spatial clarity, intention, embodiment, intricate coordination's and expanding personal vocabularies. Repertory is studied for the last hour of class.

C. Fermin
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Meets with DANCE-318-02.

DANCE-217 Site-Specific Intermediate/Advanced Modern Improvisation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course will focus on the development of site-specific improvisational dance skills. Beginning in outdoor environments, and moving indoors when the weather gets colder. Students will perform solo, duet and group improvisations inspired by nature, architecture and public spaces. Students will then collaboratively build movement choreographies using compositional methods that draw from the improvisations. There will be repeated opportunities to perform with and for each other.

T. Vandale
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-222 Intermediate Ballet

Fall. Credits: 2

This course is designed for the intermediate-level dancer. It will include a logical and efficient development of exercises culminating with varied allegro combinations. The class will provide the student the opportunity to acquire endurance and learn artistic expression. The importance of musicality within the technique will be a fundamental aspect of the class.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-223 Intermediate Ballet

Spring. Credits: 2

Continues to perfect the classical ballet technique, concentrating on small and big poses at the barre, pirouettes and adagio work in the big poses in the center, and jumps in the small and big poses in the allegro section of the class. More complex grand allegro will be presented.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs, S. Seder
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-227 Ballet IV: Pointe

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course will focus on intermediate-to-advanced pointe technique. Class will begin with a condensed barre and center, devoting the last hour to pointe work. Concentration will be placed on strengthening the foot and ankle and the development of artistry within the technique.

M. Madden
Advisory: Intermediate pointe technique level required
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-228 Ballet IV: Pointe

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course will focus on intermediate-to-advanced pointe technique. Class will begin with a condensed barre and center, devoting the last hour to pointe work. Concentration will be placed on strengthening the foot and ankle and the development of artistry within the technique.

M. Wiss
Advisory: Intermediate pointe technique level required
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-232 Intermediate Hip Hop

Spring. Credits: 2

Journey through time and experience the evolution of hip-hop from its old-school social dance roots to the contemporary phenomenon of commercial choreography that hip-hop has become. Using film and text in addition to studio work, this class will create a framework from which to understand and participate in the global culture of hip-hop dance.

S. Johnson
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-234 House Dance

Spring. Credits: 2

This course is designed for dancers to learn the fundamentals of House dance. Students will learn the history and culture of House along with terminology of the dance movements. Class will include across the floor drills and center combinations, which will ask the dancers to find their relationship to musicality, athleticism, dynamics, and articulation of the body. Improvisation is a critical component of this course. This will empower them to embody the movement, feel comfortable improvising, and have a greater capacity to learn more intricate choreography.

S. Johnson
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-238 Intermediate Level Musical Theater/Jazz

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This class is for the intermediate to advanced level dance student. It is designed to challenge and further develop jazz technique and performance quality, while also teaching students about individual styles of well-known jazz and musical theatre choreographers.

D. Vega
Advisory: The students in this class should be at a strong intermediate level or have intermediate level potential. There will be a placement audition during the first class. Students should have a back-up class chosen in case they are not ready for an intermediate-level class.
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Both flat jazz shoes and character heels are required.

DANCE-241 Scientific Foundations of Dance

Selected scientific aspects of dance, including anatomical identification and terminology, physiological principles, and conditioning/strengthening methodology. These concepts are discussed and explored experientially in relationship to the movement vocabularies of various dance styles.

DANCE-241AK Scientific Foundations of Dance: 'Anatomy and Kinesiology'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers an in-depth experiential study of the human body's skeletal and muscular systems, with additional information on bone growth and development, joint architecture, injuries and their prevention, and the discovery of personal alignment anomalies. Course work will include lecture, laboratory sessions, assigned readings, exams, the creation of a body map and the development of a personalized therapeutic regime.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Diewald

DANCE-241AM Scientific Foundations of Dance: 'Anatomy of Movement'

Spring. Credits: 4

Designed for dance students, this course is an experiential study of the human body's musculoskeletal system. The structure of this course includes lectures, movement laboratory sessions, somatic exercises, and developing a personal warmup for full-bodied dancing. Anatomical understanding becomes a springboard for clearer movement choices and deeper engagement in dance practice.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Diewald
Prereq: 2 credits in Dance.
Advisory: Previous dance experience is recommended.

DANCE-252 Intermediate Composition

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Intermediate Composition is structured as a workshop for you to explore and expand your own artistic vision. It will increase your understanding of inspiration and intention as they relate to choreography as well as encourage active consideration of choreographic possibilities for space, time, performer/audience interaction, energetic qualities, use of text, music, and physical and environmental intelligences.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
B. Diewald, P. Jones
Prereq: DANCE-151.

DANCE-261 Dance Education

DANCE-262 Somatic Studies

DANCE-262HP Somatic Studies: 'Somatic Studies and Dance Practices Toward Healing and Justice'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to a range of somatic therapy practices and their application toward healing and justice work. This will occur within legacies of African-rooted dance and performance that we witness being expressed in a traditional community practice throughout the continent and within the Diaspora. The philosophies and methodologies of these therapies will be investigated, invoked and experienced through the honoring of personal stories within the transformational framework of the community circle -- a nourishing and replenishing space welcome to beings of all races, genders and cultural backgrounds.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Physical Education
J. Jackson

DANCE-262SP Somatic Studies: 'Somatic Studies and Dance Practices'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course introduces students to a range of contemporary somatic therapy practices and their application to dance technique and performance. The philosophies and methodologies of these therapies will be investigated through a combination of readings, workshops with local practitioners, and experiential exploration. Therapeutic practices include: Mind Body Centering, Yoga, Pilates, Gyrotonics, Alexander Technique, Feldenkreis Technique, and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department

DANCE-267 Embodied Archives: Reading, Writing, and Researching Dance

Fall. Credits: 4

This course, open to all, is an introduction to qualitative research methods employed by dance scholars and practitioners. Texts will include live and recorded performances, movement-based workshops, and theoretical secondary sources. Students will gain an understanding of epistemology, autoethnography, and phenomenology as they pertain to dance practices; articulate the felt experience of dance in concrete writing; conduct interviews; develop a practice archive; and craft a detailed research proposal and review of literature. Trips to regional dance archives and local rehearsal visits will contextualize the work done in class.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
B. Diewald
Advisory: This course is designed for students who have a sustained dance or movement-based art practice, and is intended to prepare sophomore and junior dance majors for the rigors of independent choreographic practice and capstone projects.

DANCE-272 Dance and Culture

DANCE-272DC Dance and Culture

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How does dance articulate national, cultural, and social identity? How can it inscribe history and place? This course examines dance through the lens of culture and culture through dance. Students will be immersed in the methods, theories, and practice of researching dance in distinct cultural contexts. No dance experience necessary but we will take an embodied approach to our research.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
B. Diewald

DANCE-272HP Dance and Culture: Hip Hop

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will be a literary, media-based, and technical exploration of the history and influence of contemporary Hip Hop culture creation. Students will engage in an embodied study of various hip-hop dance techniques and a rigorous investigation of the influence of Hip Hop culture on music, fashion, language, media, and personal style throughout the world. The technical aspect of the course will support their study of history and culture through media, readings, discussion and research. Works cited will include peer reviewed articles, as well as the brilliance of materials created outside of the narrow academic lens. Each reading, film, or documentary that is assigned will be followed by written responses and discussions, and students will present their in-depth research findings at the end of the course.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Johnson

DANCE-287 Rhythmic Analysis

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The study of music from a dancer's perspective. Topics include musical notation, construction of rhythm, elements of composition (visual aspects of music and movement), communication between dancer and musician, and music listening.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Jones

DANCE-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Students interested in independent study in dance (Dance 295) must provide convincing reasons for pursuing independent work and be self motivated and directed in their work. Students are responsible for choosing and receiving approval from a faculty advisor, with whom workload expectations, meeting times, and outcomes will be mutually negotiated and set for the semester. Credit load (1-4) will reflect the workload level and outcomes of the proposed study (e.g., a 2-credit independent study requires a minimum of 2-4 hours of outside work each week.

The department
Instructor permission required.

DANCE-305 Dance Repertory

DANCE-305CR Dance Repertory: 'Contemporary Repertory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dancers interested in performing. The work developed will be performed in the Fall Faculty Concert.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Students must attend the Five College Dance Department audition at the beginning of the fall semester for permission to register for this course.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-305HP Dance Repertory: 'Hip Hop Repertory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced hip hop dancers interested in performing a premiere hip hop work for the Fall Faculty Dance Concert.

S. Johnson
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Students must attend the Five College Dance Department Audition at the beginning of the fall semester for permission to register for this course.
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Course meeting times will be determined following the audition.

DANCE-305RB Dance Repertory: 'Ballet Repertory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dance students interested in performing. The work developed will be performed in the Fall Faculty Concert.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Students must attend the Five College Dance Department Audition at the beginning of the fall semester for permission to register for this course.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-305RM Dance Repertory: 'Modern Repertory'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is designed for intermediate and advanced dancers interested in performing. The work developed will be performed in the Fall Faculty Concert.

B. Diewald
Advisory: Students must attend the Five College Dance Department Audition at the beginning of the fall semester for permission to register for this course.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-309 Dance Repertory: Ballet Variations

DANCE-309BV Dance Repertory: 'Classical Ballet Variations'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed for intermediate- to advanced-level dance students who wish to study classical ballet variations. The course examines the evolution of classical ballet choreography and compares and contrasts the many revivals and remakes of classical full-length productions. Students will learn variations from Swan Lake, Giselle, and Cinderella. Requirements outside of the classroom include viewing videotapes, researching choreography, and attending live performances. Pointe shoes are optional.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Flachs

DANCE-309NA Dance Repertory: Ballet Variations: 'Five Moons: Native American Ballerinas'

Spring. Credits: 4

The Five Moons are five Native American ballerinas from Oklahoma who achieved international prominence during the 20th century. The class will research and study the lives and artistic careers of these ballerinas through the embodied practice of classical ballet. Understanding their contributions to the field of ballet is an essential focus for the class. Requirements outside of the classroom include readings, viewing videos of performances, learning choreography, and group discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Advisory: This course is designed for advanced-level dance students. Pointe shoes are optional.

DANCE-318 Advanced Modern

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Intermediate and Advanced study in modern technique focuses on body level issues of strength, support, alignment, articulation, and initiation; and performance issues of rhythmic clarity, spatial clarity, intention, embodiment, intricate coordinations, and expanding personal vocabularies. Students will build capacity for physical endurance and active presence as well as a deepening awareness of the body's potential.

B. Diewald
Advisory: Students must pass the Advanced Placement Audition to take this course.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-319 Advanced Modern and Improvisation

Spring. Credits: 2

In studying dance at the advanced level, students are expected to define their own priorities, thresholds, and modes of working. This course is an opportunity for students to physically engage with dance forms rooted in modern dance and improvisational forms of the mid-twentieth century and the twenty-first century. Daily creative and physical practice and building a resilient and collective dance culture are the foundations of this course. Meeting times will be dedicated to codified modern forms, improvisational practice, and discussion. Advanced placement or instructor permission is required.

B. Diewald
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Advanced placement or instructor permission is required.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-324 Advanced Ballet

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course is the study of advanced classical ballet technique. The class focuses on the artistry and musicality of movement incorporating turns, adagio, allegro, batterie, and grand allegro.

M. Wiss
Advisory: advanced placement
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-325 Advanced Ballet

Fall. Credits: 2

Course is for advanced dancers and will stress complex classical ballet technique combinations, concentrating on turns at the barre, turns in the big poses in the centre, and batterie in the allegro. Artistry, presentation, and musicality of dance will be incorporated, with the grande allegro serving as the focus of the class. The last half hour will be devoted to advanced pointe technique.

C. Flachs, R. Flachs
Advisory: Advanced placement
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-377 Advanced Studies

DANCE-377MB Advanced Studies: 'Mobilizing Belonging: Race, Gender and Sexuality in Caribbean Performance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

How can we engage performance as a site to study creative forms of Caribbean resistance and survival? What forms of embodied practice produce, sustain, and promote Caribbean ways of knowing and being? In this upper-level seminar, students will explore a diversity of Caribbean dance and performance practices for the ways in which they mobilize forms of belonging. Paying critical attention to racial, gendered, and sexual formations, we will examine how performance has been leveraged to variously perform and contest the nation, revision power, and engender bodily freedoms. Course reading, writing, research and discussion will be supplemented with movement practice, live performance and guest artists.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
D. Chapman
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-387 Rhythmic Analysis II: Performance

Fall. Credits: 4

A continuation of Dance 287. The focus now shifts specifically to performance and the notation of complex rhythmic structures. Working as an ensemble, the class will create a music/dance suite, using body music, movement, vocal work, and music visualization as our inspiration. Emphasis will be placed on odd and mixed meters and rhythmical accuracy. Students will contribute both movement and musical material. Class time will be run like a professional rehearsal. Outside work will focus on musical research, choreography, and music notation. This suite will be performed at Blanchard Campus Center at a date to be determined.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Jones
Prereq: DANCE-287.

DANCE-390 Senior Capstone Seminar

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Each dance major will be expected to be involved in a senior project during their final year of study. One should sign up for Dance 390, Senior Seminar for both fall and spring semesters. Senior projects can vary, from choreographic or performance work to research topics.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
B. Diewald
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Notes: Repeatable for credit.

DANCE-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

Students interested in independent study in dance (Dance 395) must provide convincing reasons for pursuing independent work and be self motivated and directed in their work. Students are responsible for choosing and receiving approval from a faculty advisor, with whom workload expectations, meeting times, and outcomes will be mutually negotiated and set for the semester. Credit load (1-4) will reflect the workload level and outcomes of the proposed study (e.g., a 2-credit independent study requires a minimum of 2-4 hours of outside work each week.

The department
Instructor permission required.

DATA-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

DATA-390 Data Science Capstone

Fall. Credits: 4

The Capstone is a research seminar that brings together the three pillars of the Data Science curriculum. The course will start with common readings about research projects across a range of disciplines, including readings that address issues of ethics involved with the collection, treatment, and analysis of data. Concurrently, each student will develop an individual research topic and identify relevant data resources. The remainder of the term will be dedicated to exploring these topics through extensive data analysis, visualization, and interpretation, leading to a final report with complete results and a presentation.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
V. Barr
Prereq: COMSC-205 and STAT-340. STAT-340 may be taken concurrently (contact instructor for permission).

DATA-390A Data Science Capstone: Data Ethics

Fall. Credits: 1

This portion of the Data Science capstone will include readings and discussion of data ethics and data integrity, and students will also do preliminary identification of their capstone project focus.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Barr
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.; This course is offered to data science majors only.
Prereq: COMSC-205 and STAT-340. STAT-340 may be taken concurrently (contact instructor for permission). Coreq: DATA-390B.

DATA-390B Data Science Capstone Project

Fall. Credits: 3

This portion of the Data Science Capstone will involve refinement of the project focus, identification of data sources, iterative model development and refinement, literature search, and completion of a paper and presentation. Students will also provide substantial feedback on each other's work as a way of sharpening their data science analysis skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
V. Barr
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.; This course is offered to data science majors only.
Prereq: COMSC-205 and STAT-340. STAT-340 may be taken concurrently (contact instructor for permission). Coreq: DATA-390A.

DATA-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ECON-110 Introductory Economics

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Introduction to economic issues and the tools that economists use to study those issues: supply and demand, decision making by consumers and firms, market failures, economic output and growth, fiscal and monetary policy in relation to unemployment and inflation, and international economics. Topics include both the study of markets and the need for public policy/government action to address market failures.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Norling, M. Robinson, L. Wilson, J. Yuen, The department

ECON-165 International and Development Economics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course we analyze the determinants and patterns of economic flows between countries (trade in goods and services, capital flows, foreign direct investment, labor) and their impact on economic growth, inequality and poverty in today's industrialized countries and developing countries. We study the theories behind different development strategies and their outcomes for structural transformation and well-being in the developing world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
E. Paus
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-110.
Notes: This course has been pre-approved by the International Relations department to count in place of ECON-213 or ECON-218 towards the International Relations major requirements.

ECON-201 Game Theory

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course will illustrate and analyze the strategies used in making interrelated decisions. Concepts from game theory will be developed using examples and cases drawn from economics, business, politics, and even sports. Applications will include the Prisoner's Dilemma and related games, signaling, bargaining, voting and power, brinkmanship, and nuclear deterrence.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Robinson
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

ECON-207 Special Topics

This 200-level course investigates a particular topic in economics at some depth without presupposing prior knowledge of economics. Many students may find one or more of these courses useful complements to majors and minors other than economics.

ECON-207BF Special Topics: 'Behavioral Economics and Finance'

Spring. Credits: 4

Empirical research has located serious flaws in the concept of rational economic decision making and efficient markets. The evidence indicates that actual decision makers and markets deviate from expected rational outcomes frequently enough to require rethinking of the way decision makers think and markets behave, including unexpected market crashes and sustained market bubbles. This course is designed to examine new theoretical work that seeks to provide more accurate predictions of market behavior, improved assessments of underlying risk to portfolio holders, and better estimates of the underlying value of securities.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Gabriel
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

ECON-207FM Special Topics: 'Economics in Popular Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to political economy using a wide range of popular films as the object of analysis. Films are analyzed as representations of real world social relationships, including market behavior. The goal of the course is for students to learn the basic concepts and logic deployed in economic theories, orthodox and heterodox, and the language of contemporary social scientific debates over income distribution, agency, class, market efficiency, externalities, economic incentives, and equity. See http://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/sgabriel/filmcourse_2016.html

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Gabriel
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

ECON-210 Marxian Economic Theory

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduction to the Marxian theory of capitalism, as presented in the three volumes of Capital. Marxian theory is applied to analyze the causes of contemporary economic problems, such as unemployment and inflation, and the effectiveness of government policies to solve these problems. Comparisons made between Marxian theory and mainstream macro- and microeconomics.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
L. Wilson
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

ECON-211 Macroeconomic Theory

Fall. Credits: 4

Intermediate macroeconomic theory. Analysis of causes of long-run economic growth and short-run business cycles. Study of different macroeconomic models, consumption, investment, government spending, net exports, money supply, and money demand. Examination of fiscal and monetary policy and U.S. economic relations with the rest of the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Lay, S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-110 and MATH-101.
Advisory: Students who have taken the International Baccalaureate or A-Level exams in economics should consult the department before registering for the course. The department does not recommend taking this as the first course in Economics.

ECON-212 Microeconomic Theory

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Microeconomic theory explores the foundations of consumer and firm theory as well as their theoretical applications. We examine the assumptions of models, market structures, and explore topics such as game theory and public goods.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Schmeiser, S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-110 and MATH-101.
Advisory: Students who have taken the International Baccalaureate or A-Level exams in economics should consult the department before registering for the course. The department does not recommend taking this as the first course in Economics.

ECON-213 Economic Development

Spring. Credits: 4

Economic development is the study of the macro and micro dynamics that shape economic and social outcomes in low and middle-income countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and transition economies. The outcomes we focus on in this course are human well-being, poverty, and inequalities as well as structural transformation, economic growth, sustainability, and the creation of decent jobs. We will pay particular attention to the implications of the nature of an economy's insertion into the global economy and the global economic context, and to the role of government policies in advancing economic development.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
E. Paus
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-215 Economics of Corporate Finance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An investigation of the economic foundations for investment, financing, and related decisions in corporations. Topics include capital markets and institutions; analysis of financial statements; sources and uses of funds; capital budgeting and risk; cost of capital; portfolio theory; the impact of corporate decisions on the economy. Some attention given to recent developments in the stock market, in the merger movement, and in international finance. See https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/sgabriel/215.html for a more detailed description.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-218 International Economics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The first part of the semester investigates reasons why nations trade and factors that determine trade patterns, focusing on examples of agricultural and food trade. Using the basic tools of microeconomics, it considers the welfare and distributional impacts of free trade among countries. Further topics include barriers to trade, reasons for limiting trade, international food and agricultural policy, and current trade policy issues. The second part introduces the students to basic models in international finance and studies applications of current policy issues such as fixed exchange rates and the Euro.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
The department
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-219 Environmental Economics

Spring. Credits: 4

In this class, we will use the lens of economic analysis to examine how environmental problems arise and what can be done to resolve them. This will include an assessment of relevant environmental policies (e.g., carbon tax & cap-and-trade programs), how these policies function, and what impacts they have on people and the economy. Topics include market failures and externalities, pollution, climate change, management of renewable and nonrenewable resources, sustainability, biodiversity, and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
T. Gilliland
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-220 Introduction to Econometrics

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

A study of statistical methods applied to economic and social data. Measures of central tendency and dispersion, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, simple correlation, and simple and multiple regression analysis.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Adelman, T. Gilliland
Prereq: ECON-110 and MATH-101.

ECON-236 Economic History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of important themes in the economic history of the United States and other countries. The goals of this course are to examine reasons for economic growth over time, to use economic analysis to understand history, and to study how history shapes economic institutions today. Topics covered include the Industrial Revolution, slavery, and changes in women's earnings.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Norling
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-249 Topics in Economics

ECON-249CY Topics in Economics: 'Economics of Cyberspace'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the impact of the Internet, information technology, and the networked information economy on finance, markets, innovation and invention, intellectual property rights, public finance and taxation, security and cybercrime, media, and social networking. We investigate the implications of the networked information economy for the creation of new economic (and social) relationships. We also examine the continuing struggle over regulation of cyberspace and the definition and enforcement of intellectual property rights.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Gabriel
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-249ED Topics in Economics: 'Economics of Education'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the economics of education. We will apply basic economic concepts and empirical methods to the analysis of education. We will examine the U.S. educational system from preschool to higher education both as an industry and from a labor economics perspective. Topics include human capital theory (the relationship of education to earnings and other outcomes); the role of early childhood education; the structure, reform, and financing of elementary and secondary education (public, charter, magnet, and private schools); the market for teachers, teaching training and performance; and the economics of higher education with particular emphasis on liberal arts colleges.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Robinson
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-249EN Topics in Economics: 'Global Entrepreneurship'

Spring. Credits: 4

We will explore and discuss the policies, procedures, demands, related data (costs, investment levels, success rates, etc.) and impacts of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activity in a variety of countries and at the global level, making use of reports, case studies, data centers and organizations. Expect to explore comparisons such as: who are entrepreneurs? who tends to be successful? which governments, societies and economic systems are most supportive? which are least supportive? what are the varieties of entrepreneurial activity? has entrepreneurial activity had economic and social impacts?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
R. Feldman
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-249ME Topics in Economics: 'Managerial Economics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to the field of applied economics in which microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and concepts are applied in real-world planning and decision making in a variety of business organizations having particular yet varying priorities and goals (for example, one question to explore is how do decision makers in a socially responsible Benefit Corporation, a worker-owned cooperative, a more traditional company and a startup apply economic analysis in their pursuit of having a successful enterprise?). Expect some lectures, multiple readings, projects, writing, presentations to class, class discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Feldman
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-249PB Topics in Economics: 'Introduction to Public Economics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Analysis of the role of government in the economy from both the expenditure side and the income (tax) side. Topics include public goods, externalities, social welfare, public choice, the U.S. "safety net," social security, budget deficits, the U.S. tax system, and the effects of taxation and government programs on behavior.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Yuen
Prereq: ECON-110.

ECON-270 Accounting

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The course, while using traditional accounting techniques and methodology, will focus on the needs of external users of financial information. The emphasis is on learning how to read, interpret, and analyze financial information as a tool to guide investment decisions. Concepts rather than procedures are stressed and class time will be largely devoted to problem solutions and case discussions. A basic knowledge of arithmetic (+,-,*,/) and algebra is suggested.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Schmeiser
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.
Advisory: Not open to students who have taken EOS-225.

ECON-280 Non-Profit Business Practice

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the issues and challenges of leading a non-profit organization. Covered topics include dealing with boards, workers and volunteers and external agencies. We will consider funding and revenue sources as well as cost management. Finally, the course will explore strategic planning and program evaluation.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Robinson
Prereq: Not open to first-year students in their first semester.

ECON-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ECON-301 Advanced Game Theory

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The course will illustrate and analyze the strategies used in making interrelated decisions. We will develop game theoretical tools and apply them to examples from economics, business, politics, and even sports. Topics include the prisoner's dilemma, signaling, coordination, voting, and competition. We analyze games in static and dynamic environments with perfect and imperfect information.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211 and ECON-212.

ECON-304 Labor Economics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines modern theories of labor markets and reviews empirical evidence in support or contradiction of those theories. Topics include the supply and demand of labor, human capital theory, household and family behavior, worker mobility, union activities, wage inequality, and gender and racial discrimination. The course will also consider current public policy debates of relevance to labor markets, including minimum wages, welfare reform, educational policy, and free trade agreements.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Robinson
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212 and ECON-220.

ECON-306 Political Economy of Inequality

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This seminar develops a historical and theoretical analysis of issues and concerns arising from a Marxian specification of social and economic inequality. Using class as a lens for examining relationships between individuals, institutions, and society, the course examines the role of markets and the state in social and economic life, and the challenges of achieving class justice for all. Issues of governance, subjectivity, production, and reproduction in economic and social spheres are addressed in the writings of Darity, Hamilton, DeMartino, Marx, Williams, Robinson, Taylor, Loury, and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
L. Wilson
Prereq: ECON-210 or ECON-212.

ECON-307 Seminar in Industrial Organization

Spring. Credits: 4

Analysis of theoretical models and empirical studies on the economic performance of industries. Approaches studied include transaction cost economics, game theory, and pricing models. Topics include advertising, research and development, and relationships between government and business such as regulation and antitrust laws.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
K. Schmeiser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212.

ECON-308 Advanced Macroeconomics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the micro-founded theories of modern macroeconomic research. The course will cover the workhorse models used to understand economic growth, business cycles, unemployment, consumption, and monetary and fiscal policy. Emphasis will be on mathematical models complemented by empirical evidence from academic articles.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Yuen
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211 and ECON-212.

ECON-310 Seminar in Public Economics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the ways in which government policies on taxation and spending affect outcomes for individuals (e.g., poverty, health, income) and for society (e.g., inequality, social mobility, economic growth). Topics will include the theory of taxation, public goods, and externalities. Students will apply these theories to current policy debates. Possible applications include healthcare, education, TANF, unemployment insurance, and Social Security.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Lay
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212.

ECON-312 Seminar in International Trade

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Examines current events in international trade. The emphasis of this course is on current trade policy debates in the WTO agenda. It investigates topics such as the expansion of regional trade agreements, environmental and labor standards, the TRIPs agreement, agricultural protection and market access, trade in services, and electronic commerce.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Schmeiser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212, ECON-216, or ECON-218.

ECON-314 Economic Development in the Age of Contested Globalization

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Why have only few developing countries closed the income gap with industrialized countries? How does globalization affect the prospects for economic transformation and human well-being? How does the rise of China impact the development prospects for other latecomers? We study and discuss how orthodox and heterodox approaches answer these and other questions, and we assess proposed policies and their appropriateness in different contexts. Students have many opportunities to apply the knowledge acquired in class: in debates, simulations, quantitative and qualitative research, and discussions of authentic cases with embedded practitioners from international organizations and the private sector.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
E. Paus
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-213 and either ECON-211 or ECON-218.

ECON-319 Environmental Economics, Ecology and Conservation Policy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Understanding and solving environmental problems requires interdisciplinary perspectives. This course links tools from economics with tools from ecology and environmental sciences to design effective policies for protecting the environment. We will examine topics such as the protection of rare and endangered species, rainforest conservation, climate change and others. We will also study important domestic and international policies related to these topics.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
T. Gilliland
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212 or ECON-219.

ECON-320 Econometrics

Spring. Credits: 4

A study of advanced statistical methods in quantifying economic theory. Emphasis on the practical application of regression analysis to test economic theory, especially where the assumptions underlying ordinary least squares analysis are violated. Examines several different subjects that illustrate empirical economic research.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Robinson
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211, ECON-212 and ECON-220.

ECON-325 Economics of Health Care and Health Service Organizations

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Economic aspects of health and health care in developing countries. Topics cover measuring health outcomes for welfare analysis, economic determinants of health and health care demand, the contribution of improved health and nutrition on economic development, and considerations in designing and evaluating health care interventions. Additionally, the course will cover micro-economic topics related to specific public health problems in developing countries.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Adelman
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212 and ECON-220.

ECON-335 Advanced Corporate Finance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course allows students who have taken Corporate Finance to pursue more advanced topics in the field. Among the topics to be covered are hedging, options and derivatives, agency theory, behavioral finance, costs of financial distress, asset pricing for state-owned enterprises, and theories of corporate control and regulation.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Gabriel
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-215 or ECON-207BF.

ECON-338 Money and Banking

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Monetary theory and policy. Overview of financial markets and institutions. Explores the nature of money and the effects of changing money supply on the economy, theories of money demand, the various methods by which monetary policy can be conducted and the advantages and disadvantages of each, methods of banking regulation and the attendant problems that arise, and important episodes in monetary history (e.g., the Great Depression).

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Hartley
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211.
Advisory: MATH-101 recommended.

ECON-345 Corporate Governance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar course studies the theory and practice of corporate governance. Topics include the legal and regulatory environment in which corporations operate, agency theory, executive compensation, the board of directors, debt covenants, corporate control, and stakeholder rights. We will analyze and evaluate current events in corporate governance using the tools discussed in class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Schmeiser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211 and ECON-212.

ECON-346 Economic Demography

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Demography is the scientific study of human populations, primarily with respect to their size, structure, and development. This course studies a variety of demographic topics, including fertility, mortality, migration, poverty, and inequality. The course also develops data analysis techniques that are helpful for conducting demographic research.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Norling
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-220. Coreq: ECON-346L.

ECON-349 Advanced Topics in Economics

ECON-349AM Advanced Topics in Economics: 'Advanced Managerial Economics'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will use an intensive case-study approach mixed with lectures, readings, and discussions. The focus is investigating the economics of management and enterprise (firms, organizations) decision-making in local/regional, national, and global settings, the intersections of economic considerations with social and political considerations, and the frameworks and tools for analyzing the behaviors and decisions of various enterprises. Class participation in the discussions is essential. Students will also develop and provide presentations of case analyses.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Prereq: ECON-110 plus at least one other upper-level Economics or EOS/Entrepreneurship course.

ECON-349CV Advanced Topics in Economics: 'The Economics of the Covid-19 Pandemic'

Spring. Credits: 4

The Covid-19 pandemic has manifested itself in a variety of micro- and macro-economic phenomena. In this course, we will examine several of these from the perspective of economics, attempting to understand what has happened and to identify possible policy options. We'll consider questions such as: Why are there shortages of certain consumer products? Which industries have been hurt the most/least? What permanent changes may result from workplace experiments during the pandemic? What is the nature of the recession and how does it differ from the Great Recession? What is the thinking behind the stimulus package? What are the anticipated impacts on higher education and on Mount Holyoke in particular? How does one do epidemiology modeling? How can we use econometric modeling to answer questions about the pandemic? How could economic incentives be used to improve our response? Each student will write two short essays and one longer paper to answer questions of their choice.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Robinson
Prereq: ECON-211, ECON-212, and ECON-220.

ECON-349DE Advanced Topics in Economics: 'Advanced Economic Development'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course analyzes microeconomic concerns in less-developed countries, specifically economic behavior for agricultural households facing missing and incomplete markets. Topics include agricultural production and input markets, risk and uncertainty, microfinance, and health and education. This course will focus on developing microeconomic models and analyzing empirical evidence.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
S. Adelman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212 and ECON-220.

ECON-349PE Advanced Topics in Economics: 'International Political Economy'

Spring. Credits: 4

The course will address international problems and issues that are multi-dimensional, including those shaping and shaped by political, cultural, economic, and ecological processes. Each issue or problem will be analyzed from multiple theoretical perspectives, drawing upon a wide range of theories in economics, politics, and sociology. The course will provide students with experience debating complex problems that have both global and local implications, including upon international trade and development, civil unrest, human rights, innovation in material and process technologies, inequality and political, economic, and cultural tensions between nation-states.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
S. Gabriel
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-211.

ECON-352 Advanced Economic Development

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course analyzes microeconomic concerns in less-developed countries, specifically economic behavior for agricultural households facing missing and incomplete markets. Topics include agricultural production and input markets, risk and uncertainty, microfinance, and health and education. This course will focus on developing microeconomic models and analyzing empirical evidence.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Adelman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ECON-212 and ECON-220.

ECON-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

EDUC-205 Social Justice in Education

Fall. Credits: 4

When do we bring up issues of identity (i.e., race, class, gender, etc) in a classroom? What do teachers need to interrupt racism and other types of oppression? How do societal issues affect schools and communities? This course examines the historical, social, and legal underpinnings of social constructions and how perspectives on racism and other types of oppression have influenced lives within school communities. Topics include white privilege, white supremacy, and accountability, achievement and opportunity gaps, gender oppression, classism, and the impact of anti-oppressive pedagogies on multiple levels. Intersectionality of race and other identities will also be addressed. Essays, response papers, and final project are required.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Matos
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EDUC-233 Educational Psychology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

What do we learn? How do we learn? Why do we learn? In this course, we will study issues of learning, teaching, and motivation that are central to educational psychology. We will explore the shifting paradigms within educational psychology, multiple subject matter areas, (dis)continuities between classroom and home cultures, students' prior experiences, teachers as learners, ethnic and gender identity in the classroom, and learning in out-of-school settings.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-233
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
B. Packard
Prereq: A 100-level psychology course or AP Psychology.

EDUC-263 Teaching English Language Learners

Fall. Credits: 4

This course addresses core competencies outlined in the Massachusetts Department of Education's English Language Learner certificate requirement. Readings in language acquisition theory, language learning and teaching, effective lesson design and assessment, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol, and knowledge of intercultural learners are covered. Students will have experience developing and adapting lessons and curriculum to address the needs of students. All participants will have opportunities to connect theory and practice.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Jacoby
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Permission of instructor. Preference is given to students enrolled in the teacher licensure program.

EDUC-267 Children's Literature for Educators

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces various genres of children's literature, including literature for adolescents; explores equity and social justice issues; and examines approaches to using literature in the preK-8 curriculum with an emphasis on social-emotional learning and making literature accessible to all learners. Students will read a variety of texts across genres and discuss ways to integrate literature into curriculum and learning as they expand their knowledge and appreciation of children's literature. Literature will be examined from multiple perspectives.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Only available to juniors and seniors in the teacher licensure program.

EDUC-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EDUC-300 The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Literacy in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools

Spring. Credits: 4

Through a balanced and integrated approach students will learn to develop literacy in early childhood/elementary schools. Class members will learn about emergent literacy, diagnosing language needs, integrating phonics skills in a literature-based program, the teaching of process writing, children's fiction and nonfiction literature, and the use of portfolios for assessment. Course required for spring semester practicum students. Course evaluation is based on written and oral work done individually and in groups. Requires a prepracticum.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Jacoby
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Limited to students accepted to the practicum year program

EDUC-320 Observing and Assisting in Inclusive Classrooms

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

Students are expected to complete a supervised field experience full-time every day during January Intersession in an inclusive classroom in a school setting. Placements can be located within or outside of the Five College area. In addition to the field experience component, students attend three course meetings (detailed below). Reading and writing assignments focus on a survey of learning disabilities, descriptions of special education programs, understanding Individuals with Disabilities Education Act policies and placement options, interpreting Individualized Education Program plans, and planning curriculum for inclusive classrooms.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: One of the following: PSYCH-230, PSYCH-233, EDUC-205.
Advisory: This course is limited to seniors that have been accepted into the teacher licensure program. Permission to participate in prepracticum experience for credit is contingent upon attendance at the meetings in November. Consult Ms. Frenette in October for exact dates of the November course meetings.
Notes: This course is required of all students pursuing teacher licensure. Graded on a credit/no credit basis. Three mandatory meetings (2 hours each): one in November, one in December, and one in February. Prepracticum: five days a week for three weeks in January.

EDUC-322 Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood and Elementary Education

Spring. Credits: 4

This weekly seminar provides students with opportunities to examine curriculum development models, develop an integrated curriculum unit utilizing state and national content area standards, review researched based models of classroom management, and engage in dialogue with practicing teachers regarding numerous aspects of teaching and student learning. Additional topics covered include the arts in education, physical education, legal obligations of teachers, and home-school communication. As is the case in all pre-licensure programs, there is continued emphasis on addressing the needs of students with disabilities and English Language Learners.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Limited to students accepted into the practicum year program

EDUC-323 Student Teaching in Early Childhood and Elementary Schools

Spring. Credits: 10

Students participate in full-time student teaching in early childhood and elementary classrooms for 12 weeks. During this semester-long field-based placement, students hone classroom management skills, implement an extended integrated curriculum unit, deliver lessons in all content areas, and develop a wide range of assessment skills. The practicum culminates in two weeks of Lead Teaching, during which the student is responsible for managing all aspects of the classroom program. Students work with classroom teachers and college supervisors to address Professional Teaching Standards as required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Candidate Assessment of Performance.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Frenette
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EDUC-300, EDUC-320, and EDUC-325.
Notes: Credit/no credit grading. 5 days a week for 12 weeks full-time student teaching in school site (includes Mount Holyoke College's spring break); limited to students accepted to the practicum year program.

EDUC-324 Observing and Assisting in Early Childhood and Elementary Settings

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 2

Discussions and fieldwork provide the student with an opportunity to understand the classroom as a learning community. The tutorial includes several meetings focusing on the student's participant observations and assigned readings. Fieldwork includes a minimum of 20 hours on site, individually scheduled in early childhood (pre K-2) or elementary (1-6) settings. Assessment includes in-progress reports and a final project related to fieldwork. Course graded on a credit/no credit basis.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
S. Frenette
Instructor permission required.
Notes: 1 credit (20 hours of prepracticum); 2 credits (40 hours or more of prepracticum). Credit/no credit grading.

EDUC-325 The Process of Teaching and Learning: Developing Math/Science/Technology Instruction and Curriculum

Fall. Credits: 4

Students will learn about inquiry-based science/math curriculum and use of technology in PreK-6 classrooms. They will construct more extensive understandings of science/math instruction by developing lessons that implement the Massachusetts Frameworks incorporating the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Emphasis will be on learning diverse management and instructional practices, such as the use of manipulatives, problem solving, cooperative learning, and project-based learning. Students will also become more adept at developing effective approaches to using assessment to guide instruction. All participants will have opportunities to connect theory and practice.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Mattone
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Limited to students accepted in the practicum year program.

EDUC-330 The Process of Teaching and Learning in Secondary and Middle Schools

Fall. Credits: 4

This course addresses the question: what does teaching for understanding look like, and how can we plan for it? Informed by current research and effective teaching practice, students learn to plan and implement curricular units and lessons that engage adolescents, strengthen their literacy skills, and further their understanding of content. Topics include establishing a supportive classroom environment, designing equitable learning situations for students from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural and linguistic backgrounds as well as students with special needs, using digital media to enhance learning, and examining the connections between pedagogy and classroom management. All participants will have opportunities to connect theory and practice.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Matos
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: Students wishing to gain experience for Teach for America (and other teacher residency programs), the Fulbright Scholars program, Science Buddies, etc. may enroll with permission of instructor. Required for all teacher candidates accepted into the middle and secondary teacher licensure programs

EDUC-331 Student Teaching in Secondary and Middle Schools

Spring. Credits: 10

Students participate in full-time student teaching in middle or secondary classrooms for 12 weeks. During this semester-long field-based placement, students hone classroom management skills, design and implement curriculum, and develop a wide range of assessment skills. Students work with classroom teachers and college supervisors to address Professional Teaching Standards as required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Candidate Assessment of Performance.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Matos
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EDUC-320 and EDUC-330.
Notes: Credit/no credit grading. 5 days a week for 12 weeks; full-time student teaching in school sites (includes Mount Holyoke College's/Amherst College's spring break); students must apply for and be accepted into the practicum semester a year prior to the practicum.

EDUC-332 Observing and Assisting in Secondary and Middle School Educational Programs

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 2

This is a fieldwork-based independent study course. During the fall and spring semesters it involves 20 to 40 hours of individually scheduled fieldwork in a secondary or middle-school classroom or educational program. Students keep a reflective journal, read relevant articles and essays, meet regularly with the instructor, and write a final report.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
J. Matos
Instructor permission required.
Notes: This course is graded on a credit/no credit basis.

EDUC-333 Practicum Seminar on Teaching and Learning: Middle and Secondary Education

Spring. Credits: 4

This weekly seminar provides students with opportunities to design and discuss case studies involving adolescents in middle and secondary school settings, review researched-based models of instruction, and classroom management, and engage in dialogue with professionals regarding numerous aspects of teaching and student learning. Additional topics covered include reviewing the legal obligations of teachers, addressing the needs of students with disabilities, English language learners, and developing effective communication between home and school.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Matos
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Limited to seniors who have been accepted into the practicum year program. Section 02 is limited to Amherst College students who have been accepted into the practicum year program.

EDUC-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

EDUST-203 Teaching Children Science: College Students in the Elementary Classroom

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed for science students with interests in teaching and learning with children. It will focus on research, theory and practice pertinent to science education, linking scientific information gained in college classes to children's learning of scientific phenomena. Weekly class meetings (from 1-3 hours) will include laboratory and off-site field investigations. Each student will also become a 'Science Buddy' at a local elementary school, assisting children with hands-on science experiences for at least 1 hour each week.

Crosslisted as: BIOL-203
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
R. Fink
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: One year of any college science (in any discipline), at least one lab course.

EDUST-221 Self-Awareness in Education

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Educators bring our whole selves when entering educational spaces. With us, we bring lived experiences and social identities as well as expectations, ideals, and emotional reactions to oppression (Adams et al., 2007). Whether implementing a curriculum or policy, this course will assist future educators and policy makers in exploring social identities within their intended roles in education. Frameworks and theories around oppression and liberation will be used for reflection and action related to racism, classism, gender, and adultism.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Matos
Notes: Weekly reflections and a final project required.

EDUST-250 Special Topics in Educational Studies

EDUST-250TH Special Topics in Educational Studies: 'Ethnic Studies and Education: The Movement, Tensions, and Possibilities'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the key concepts and central questions informing the field of Ethnic Studies in K-12 educational settings. Despite the radical origins of Ethnic Studies, the field must navigate mainstream education reform efforts, which continues to rely on dominant conceptualizations of literacy and knowledge as well as acritical visions for nation-building and global citizenship. The course will explore the socio-political conditions that underscore the urgency for Ethnic Studies and outline the pedagogical orientation of Ethnic Studies programs. It also carves a space for reflection on the role that educators and teacher-activists can play in the movement to transform K-12 schools.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250TH
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Arce

EDUST-290 Capstone in Educational Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 2

This two-credit independent study course, which is the culminating experience of the educational studies minor, requires analysis and synthesis of key ideas that emerged during focused study in the minor. Students will work with a faculty advisor of the Educational Studies Program Committee as they plan, write, and present a capstone paper.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Jacoby, J. Matos
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EDUC-205 and permission of instructor.

EDUST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EDUST-339 Seminar in Educational Studies

EDUST-339EP Seminar in Educational Studies: 'Educational Policy'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, students will explore educational policy including why policy-making and policies matter, what makes compelling evidence to various stakeholders, ways to identify levers for change, and the negotiation processes. We will consider local, state, federal policy, and international comparative cases. Students will analyze the ways in which policy, practice, and theory intersect or diverge, and why. Beyond course materials, students will choose a topic, draft and revise a written policy brief, as well as practice pitching policy through spoken word.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
B. Packard
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Advisory: One 200-level course in Educational Studies or relevant area recommended.

EDUST-351 Topics in Education

EDUST-351SJ Topics in Education: 'Social Justice and Education'

Spring. Credits: 4

As U.S. racial group populations are on the rise, educational institutions need to prepare for racial diversity reflected in classrooms from elementary school to college. In this lab course, students will use qualitative research methods and social justice frameworks to code and analyze three distinct data sets, one collected from Puerto Rican parents in Holyoke; one from a college course on social justice; and one from pre-service teachers in public schools. Students will create posters to display their findings on the presence (or absence) of social justice in education at the end-of-semester event.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-310SJ
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Matos
Restrictions: This course is limited to seniors.; This course is limited to PSYCH, PSYED, and NEURO majors only.
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: PSYCH-204 and EDUC-205.
Notes: If there are openings in the second week of pre-registration, the course may open to junior majors.

EDUST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENGL-104 Academic Discourse and Multilingual Speakers

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course we to seek to achieve clarity and precision of expression within a discussion of a complex topic. Course readings and writing assignments guide students through an examination of topics related to language, culture, and academic convention. Past semesters' topics include: the role of education in society; the relationship between religion, culture, and nature; and family relationships across cultures. In addition to the academic content, the course focuses on the writing and revising process, academic research and argumentation, and the nature and purpose of academic discourse. This course is intended for students whose native language is not English and who would like to refine their writing and speaking skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Shea

ENGL-199 Introduction to the Study of Literature

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines various strategies of literary representation through a variety of genres, including such traditional literary forms as the novel, lyric poetry, drama, and autobiography, as well as other cultural forms, such as film. Particular attention is given to student writing; students are expected to write a variety of short essays on selected topics. Though the themes of specific sections may vary, all sections seek to introduce students to the terminology of literary and cultural discourse.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman, C. Bailey, C. Benfey, S. Roychoudhury, J. Tan, E. Young, W. Yu
Prereq: Any first-year seminar. May take concurrently. Prereq: Any first-year seminar. May take concurrently.
Notes: English 199, required for the English major, introduces students to critical issues in the study of English literature. Students considering an English major will ordinarily take English 199 after taking a first year seminar.

ENGL-201 Introduction to Creative Writing

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers an introduction to the composition of multiple genres and modes of creative writing, which may include poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, hybrid forms, graphic novels, and digital texts. Students will learn strategies for generating ideas, drafting, giving and receiving feedback, revising creative work, and building literary community.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace, L. Glasser, A. Hong, A. Lawlor, The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: A first-year seminar.

ENGL-202 Introduction to Journalism

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers analysis of and practice in various forms of journalistic writing, including news and feature, editorial and opinion pieces, and personal essays. The emphasis is on newspaper journalism, along with a semester-long article suitable for magazines. There are weekly writing assignments and discussions of peers' work. Producing a published story is a course goal.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
T. Brewster
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Second-semester first-years may apply for permission of instructor.

ENGL-203 Short Story Writing I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This workshop will introduce students to the short story form as practiced by contemporary and canonical writers. Students will learn to read fiction actively, as writers developing their craft. We will focus on understanding the elements of fiction with an eye toward eventual mastery. Writing short stories will comprise the main work of this course, and students will work specifically on point of view, development of scenes, characterization, plot, and narration.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-201 or another writing course by permission of instructor.

ENGL-204 Poetry Writing

Fall. Credits: 4

In this introductory course, students will read widely in contemporary poetry. Through prompts and project-based inquiry, both within the workshop and in take-home assignments, students will have the opportunity to produce and share writing based on the conceptual frameworks explored in the class.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-205 Playwriting

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers practice in the fundamentals of dramatic structure and technique. Weekly reading assignments will examine the unique nature of writing for the theatre, nuts and bolts of format, tools of the craft, and the playwright's process from formulating a dramatic idea to rewriting. Weekly writing assignments will include scene work, adaptation, and journaling. The course will culminate in a significant writing project. Each class meeting will incorporate reading student work aloud with feedback from the instructor and the class. Students will listen, critique, and develop the vocabulary to discuss plays, structure, story, and content.

Crosslisted as: FMT-240PW
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: One course in Film, Media, Theater or Theatre Arts or a creative writing English course.
Notes: Cannot be taken at the 300 level.

ENGL-211 Shakespeare

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

A study of some of Shakespeare's plays emphasizing the poetic and dramatic aspects of his art, with attention to the historical context and close, careful reading of the language. Eight or nine plays.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-213 The Literature of the Later Middle Ages

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine a variety of English works and genres written in the thirteenth through fifteenth centuries. Our concentration will be principally on the Gawain-poet, Chaucer, Langland, Margery Kempe, and Lydgate. Most of our readings are in Middle English.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-214 Topics in Medieval Studies

ENGL-214LR Topics in Medieval Studies: 'Love and Reason in Medieval Romance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Arthurian legend conjures enduring stereotypes of chivalry and romantic love, but how do we go about situating medieval romance in literary history? Where does it come from, why was it written, who read it, and how did it change over time? In this course, students will learn about romance's historical and social contexts, its form, tropes, and imagery. We will think about romance's contemplation of justice, loyalty, subjectivity, love, and shame, especially as this body of literature grapples with the conflicts that arise between the mortal and divine. Course readings will include works by Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Spenser. We will read in Middle English where possible.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Advisory: ENGL-210 or ENGL-213 recommended.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-214RE Topics in Medieval Studies: 'Riddling in Old English'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will acquaint students with English as it was written and spoken over 1,000 years ago. By introducing Old English as a language system, this course will provide insight into early medieval literacy with special attention paid to the genre of riddles. The first several weeks will be spent on learning the basics of Old English alongside the contexts in which Old English writing was produced. Toward the end of the term, we'll focus our attention on translating select riddles from the Exeter Book. Assignments will include primary and secondary readings, a translation exam, and essays.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Advisory: No prior knowledge of Old English is presumed, but some familiarity with foreign language learning will be helpful. At least one 200-level course in a literary genre or period strongly recommended but not required.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-215 Chaucer's Literary World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Who and what did Chaucer read? How did Chaucer's literary environment move him to explore love, human will, differences of perspective, and ideas of closure (the efficacy of complaint, poetic endings, and the poet's accomplishments). These topics will be studied in light of the ranging literary influences from the medieval world, especially Chaucer's adaptation of classical poetry, French and Italian vernacular verse, romance, saints' lives, allegory, and beast fables. All readings are in Middle English, concentrating on a selection of Chaucer's short poems and his major works prior to The Canterbury Tales.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Advisory: ENGL-213 or ENGL-214 strongly recommended
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-217 Topics in English

ENGL-217CT Topics in English: 'Globalization and the City'

Spring. Credits: 4

Through an exploration of texts from Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe, this course examines literary representations of cities, particularly those arising from historical and contemporary globalization. We will explore such themes as power relationships between cities in the Western world and the global south, migrations, neoliberalism, environmental concerns, gender and sexuality, and the unique place of world cultures amid more vexing concerns about the mixed impact of globalization. Readings will include works by Ama Ata Aidoo, Dionne Brand, Achy Obejas, Elif Safak, Virginia Woolf and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Bailey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-217CY Topics in English: 'Cyberpunk in Asia'

Spring. Credits: 4

In popular movies such as Blade Runner and Ghost in the Shell, cyberpunk dystopias have often been associated with Asian cities, neon signs, and crowded bustling streets. What can exploring past and current portrayals of a cyberpunk future tell us about how we view Asia now? What can this aesthetic tell us about corporate dystopias? This course will look at film and texts that interrogate the intersection of race, technology, history, nation, and capital flows. We will read novels such as Pattern Recognition, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, view films such as Blade Runner, and view anime such as Howl's Moving Castle to learn about how historical and economic forces have shaped the way the future is imagined, and why the place of that reckoning resonates with Asia today.

Crosslisted as: CST-249CY
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-217GA Topics in English: 'Global Anglophone Literature: Who Writes the World?'

Fall. Credits: 4

The word "screening" in this course's title invokes its double and opposite meanings: that of projecting, but also that of obscuring. What gets foregrounded when we talk about global Anglophone literature and what gets occluded? In other words, who gets to say what? And for whom? In this course we will question the concept of the canon and how the canon has changed as more prominent, multiethnic writers across the globe write in English. We will dissect terms such as "multiculturalism," "cosmopolitanism," and "globalization." In addition to close reading texts by writers such as Kazuo Ishiguro and Ruth Ozeki alongside relevant theorists such as Gayatri Spivak and Rebecca Walkowitz, this course will not only take seriously the multinational nature of the authors we will read, their multinational personal histories, and the multinational settings of their novels, but also their dislocations and translocations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-217GE Topics in English: 'Global English: Its Written and Spoken Forms'

Fall. Credits: 4

What is the relationship between language and social and political power? This course is an interdisciplinary study of the global role of the English language. Migration, education, and identity are major themes of the course, and we look at how linguists, policy-makers, and individuals grapple with these complex topics. This course also focuses on students' development of their written and spoken communication skills and is open to students in all disciplines. Our approach to writing and speaking may be particularly effective for students who do not identify as native speakers of English.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Shea

ENGL-219 Topics in Creative Writing

ENGL-219AT Topics in Creative Writing: 'Writing Animal Tales'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do writings about animals reveal about their lives? How do human beings engage with mammals, fish, reptiles, and birds as food, competitors, and companions? We will explore these questions as we read works focusing on the real and imagined lives of animals from ancient fables through 21st-century novels, essays, and hybrid-genre works. Reading discussions will be followed by writing experiments designed to spark original thinking and develop facility with writing. You will gain insight into the fine and ferocious literature concerning the great and small beasts, writing creative and analytical pieces toward a final portfolio. Some classes will involve field trips to observe animals.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Hong
Prereq: ENGL-201.

ENGL-219FB Topics in Creative Writing: 'Writing Fabulist Fiction'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In which our heroes will explore contemporary and classic fabulist fiction, fairy tales, and mythic fiction in order to produce their own short stories. Some of the authors we may read include Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Isak Dineson, Gabriel García Márquez, Nalo Hopkinson, Porochista Khakpour, Larissa Lai, Kelly Link, Carmen Maria Machado, and Bruno Schulz.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 or equivalent.

ENGL-219QT Topics in Creative Writing: 'Queer and Trans Writing'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about creative writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204QT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 and 4 credits in Gender Studies.

ENGL-220 Introduction to British Literary and Cultural Studies since 1660

This course offers a broad study of selected figures in modern literary and intellectual history and helps prepare students for more advanced classes in British and/or postcolonial studies. We will use these figures to probe the dynamic relationship between imaginative practice and social change, which may involve global as well as national contexts. This course will introduce students to writing sustained pieces of critical analysis, challenging them to explore the theoretical relationship between literary form and historical transformation in the modern period.

ENGL-231 British Romanticism: Revolution and Reaction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This class will examine the ways Romantic-era writers figured revolution and the reaction against it, in the wake of the French Revolution's spectacular but failed promises of liberty, fraternity, and equality for all. We will pay special attention to how British writers envisioned their own versions of freedom and equality, extending them to women, slaves, and the poor. Likewise we will explore how this project for social change was necessarily related to revolutions in language and aesthetics. Authors may include Burke, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Smith, Barbauld, Blake, Austen, Keats, Percy and Mary Shelley, Byron, and Hemans.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-232 Rovers, Cuckqueens, and Country Wives of All Kinds: The Queer Eighteenth Century

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With the rise of the two-sex model, the eighteenth century might be seen to be a bastion of heteronormativity leading directly to Victorian cis-gender binary roles of angel in the house and the bourgeois patriarch. Yet, beginning with the Restoration's reinvention of ribald theater, this period was host to a radical array of experimentation in gender and sexuality, alongside intense play with genre (e.g., the invention of the novel). We will explore queerness in all its forms alongside consideration of how to write queer literary histories.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204ET
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: This course is part of a two-semester sequence with Nonbinary Romanticism, but students are encouraged to take either course separately. Meets the 1700-1900 requirement.

ENGL-233 Nonbinary Romanticism: Genders, Sexes, and Beings in the Age of Revolution

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With the onslaught of American, French, Haitian, and South American revolts and revolutions, the Atlantic world, much of Europe, and its colonial/industrial empire were thrown into a period of refiguring the concept of the raced, national, and gendered subject. This course considers what new forms of gender, sex, sexuality, and being were created, practiced, or thought, however momentarily, in this tumultuous age. Specific attention is given to conceptions of nonbinary being (of all varieties). Authors may include E. Darwin, Equiano, Wollstonecraft, Lister, M. Shelley, Byron, Jacobs.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-204NB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Notes: This course is a second part of a two-course sequence with ENGL-232, but each may be taken separately. Contact the instructor for permission if you have not taken ENGL-232. Fulfills the English Department's 1700-1900 requirement.

ENGL-234 Topics in Theatre Studies

ENGL-234SP Topics in Theatre Studies: 'Shakespeare in Performance: Case Studies in Stage Production History'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

To what purpose(s) have Shakespeare's plays been staged, and how has staging practice changed and developed? Our focus will be broad, covering such matters as acting, directing, design, history/criticism/dramaturgy. Units will include period/modern-dress Shakespeare, anti-realist staging, changing acting styles, "historically accurate" productions, "global Shakespeare," topical/political productions, and gender/race in casting. Several Key plays will form the core: Midsummer Night's Dream, Macbeth, Hamlet, and The Winter's Tale. The course will involve some attendance at live performance (likely a group trip to New York).

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Notes: Theatre tickets and food are the responsibility of the student. Cost of travel arrangements to New York is undetermined at this time.

ENGL-235 Modern British Poetry

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This introduction to modern British poetry pays special attention to the emergence, consolidation, and dismantling of modernist poetry and poetics. It will link this literary history with, amongst other things, the loss of faith, the two world wars, and the relationship between monumental aesthetics, utopian poetics, and totalitarian politics. Writers will include Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, H.D., and Auden.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-239 Novels of the Later Eighteenth Century

ENGL-239WH Novels of the Later Eighteenth Century: 'Worthy Hearts and Saucy Wits'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Eighteenth-century England witnessed the birth of the novel, a genre that in its formative years was both lauded for its originality and condemned as intellectually and morally dangerous, especially for young women. We will trace the numerous prose genres that influenced early novelists, including conduct manuals, epistolary writing, conversion narratives, travelogues, romance, and the gothic. In doing so, we will concomitantly examine the novel's immense formal experimentation alongside debates about developing notions of gender and class as well as the feeling, thinking individual. Authors may include Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Walpole, Burney, and others.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-240 American Literature I

Fall. Credits: 4

A survey of American literature from the literature of exploration to the Civil War, with special attention to the formation of an American literary tradition, along with the political, social, and religious contexts that helped shape the imaginative responses of American writers to their culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-241 American Literature II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, with special attention to literary redefinitions of race, gender, sexuality, and class and to changes in literary form.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: does not meet English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-242 Topics in American Literature

ENGL-242AE Topics in American Literature: 'The American Essay'

Spring. Credits: 4

Throughout the history of the United States, the essay has been a vital literary genre. From religious and confessional essays to personal, political, and satirical ones, American authors have explored their passions and hatreds in this flexible form. We will read essays from the nineteenth century to the present, with the opportunity to write essays of our own. Authors may include Thoreau, Baldwin, Didion, and Maggie Nelson, along with international writers, such as Woolf and Zadie Smith, who have influenced American essayists.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-242ED Topics in American Literature: 'Emily Dickinson and the Nineteenth Century'

Spring. Credits: 4

Dickinson is often portrayed as isolated in her New England surroundings. But she was intensely involved with the changing American society around her, as evidenced in her poems and letters. Students in this course will examine several of Dickinson's major themes and genres; her family and friendships; her place in popular culture. We will explore her single year at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, while comparing Mary Lyon's vision of women's education with the views of Margaret Fuller and others. We will also talk about the impact of the Civil War on Dickinson's work, and her choice of a mentor, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, who led an African-American regiment in the Union Army.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Benfey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-242NA Topics in American Literature: 'Nature and American Landscape Narrative, Past and Present'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on the echo of early American narratives on nature and landscape (1800s and early 1900s), both visual and literary, in more modern or contemporary works. In the context of a history tainted with destruction, and in the face of environmental concerns today, we will explore the struggle to sustain an authentic connection with the natural world. Through a study of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, and art, students will consider the interplay of past and present. Does the sense of loss in the history of American landscape influence the approach of modern and contemporary American writers and artists as they consider the concept of preservation? Were current environmental concerns anticipated by writers of the past? Is the history of nature-writing in American narrative a love affair with landscape, an expression of grief and mourning, or both? Do issues of gender, race, or class influence the shape of narratives on the American landscape?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: This course will link with ARTH-290NE for comparative discussion and joint exploration. Meets English department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-242SC Topics in American Literature: 'Landscape and Loss in 20th-21st Century American Narrative'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on 20th-21st Century American narratives on landscape. In the context of a history tainted by destruction, and in the face of environmental concerns today, the course will explore the struggle to sustain an authentic connection with the natural world. Through a study of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, and art, students will address a range of questions. Does the history of loss within the American landscape carry particular challenges for writers and artists wishing to establish new definitions of what it means to work toward preservation? Does nature-writing in American narrative become a source of celebration, a love affair with landscape, or an expression of grief, a means of mourning? To what extent does gender, race, or class influence the shape of modern and contemporary narratives on the American landscape?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: ENGL-199 recommended.

ENGL-243 American Gothic

Fall. Credits: 4

An examination of the gothic -- a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity -- in U.S. literature and visual culture. Topics include slavery and the gothic; gender, sexuality, and the gothic; regional gothic; the uncanny; cinematic and pictorial gothic; pandemic gothic. Authors, artists, and filmmakers may include Dunbar, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Jackson, Kubrick, LaValle, Lovecraft, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Parks, Peele, Poe, Polanski, Romero, and Wood.

Crosslisted as: FMT-230AG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: English 240 or 241 recommended

ENGL-248 Effective Public Speaking

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course provides the opportunity to develop speaking skills in a range of academic and professional situations. Through speaking, revision, and reflection, students identify their strengths as speakers, evaluate their improvement, and develop strategies for formal and informal speaking contexts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. Shea
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Notes: Half semester course. This section is designed to consider the needs of multilingual and second language speakers, but it is open to upper-level students of any language background.

ENGL-249 Style, Voice, and Self in Academic Discourse

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Academic discourse (writing and speaking) is often described as impersonal and objective. Expertise, evidence, and argument are valued. Clarity and concision are expected. Individuality and creativity are rarely mentioned, but can they have a place in academic discourse? This course will explore that question while discussing the relationship between academic and public discourse, social media in academic conversations, academic ethics, and Standard English as a default language for academic communication.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Shea
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: The course is designed for students who do not identify as native speakers of English, but it is open to all students.

ENGL-250 African American Literature I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

African American literature, particularly in the early part of the formation of the United States, reflects the dichotomy between citizenship and American identity. This course will study the literary works of African Americans from the late-eighteenth century to 1865. Beginning with slave narratives and early poetry, we will consider issues of genre, literary tradition, and historical context while gaining experience in analyzing literary texts. Themes of alienation, communion, haunting, and upward mobility will be covered to illuminate the expansive world of early African American literature. Authors include: Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, David Walker, Phillis Wheatley, and William Wells Brown.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-250
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English Department 1700-1900 requirement

ENGL-251 Contemporary African American Literature II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine African American literature and culture in the postwar period as American identities are coalescing around the concept of the US as a world power. Specifically, our task during the semester will be to discuss the myriad ways black authors and artists attempt to interrogate the structure of racial hegemony by creating poetry and prose meant to expand notions of culture and form. We will also examine music, visual art, and advertisements from this era to have a greater sense of the black experience through various cultural representations. Writers will include James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ralph Ellison, Michael S. Harper and bell hooks.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-251
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
K. J. Brown

ENGL-252 Caribbean Literature in the Age of Globalization

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers a study of selected Caribbean drama, prose, and poetry. We will read works published since 1970 that explore central themes such as the enduring impact of slavery and colonization, resistance movements, global migration and diasporic experiences, the constructions of gender, and the importance of history and memory. This course also engages deeply with form, particularly the role of orature, performance, and global popular cultures. We will read the literary works of writers such as Dionne Brand, Maryse Conde, Edwidge Danticat, and Marlon James.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-241CB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Bailey
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-265 Children's and Young Adult Literature

ENGL-265CL Children's and Young Adult Literature: 'A View from Childhood to the World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the field of history of American Literature for youth with an emphasis on literature from the 1960s to the current day. Students will read diverse literature from multiple genres and engage in thoughtful analysis of the literature as it reflects the historical, cultural, psychological and sociological nature of American society past, present, or future.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
The department
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level.

ENGL-267 Reading and Writing in the World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to reading and writing about "environment", this seminar will attempt an exchange across distinct approaches to observing and describing the world around us. Do lenses of culture, discipline, and gender impact how we see and experience nature, environment, and place? Course work will include reading such authors as N. Scott Momaday, Jamaica Kincaid, Leslie Marmon Silko, Mary Oliver, Terry Tempest Williams, Wendell Berry, Henry David Thoreau, Frederck Douglass; and many others; field trips; and writing assignments--weekly field notes and journals, analytical papers, and personal essays.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-267
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form. Please try to apply during advising week.

ENGL-268 Cognitive Theory and Literary Studies

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A survey of philosophical, scientific, and theoretical approaches to the relation between cognition and representation. For as long as we have told stories, we have thought about how they work in conjunction with the mind. This course charts the many ways in which cognitive theory has shaped literary studies over the ages. How does fiction reflect the way we think? How in turn does it shape how we behave? What happens in the brain and body when we read? Starting in antiquity and working through history towards contemporary neuroscience and cognitive psychology, we will consider such matters as action and imitation; reality and fantasy; reason and imagination; aesthetics, empathy, and affect.

Crosslisted as: CST-249CT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-274 Introduction to Asian American Literature

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to Asian American literature, considering its historical origins and evolution. Throughout the course we explore questions of identity, immigration and citizenship, generational conflict, war and migration, and mixed and cross-racial politics. Readings of primary texts will be supplemented by historical and critical source materials. Authors may include Nina Revoyr, Ruth Ozeki, Nam Le, Chang-rae Lee, Aimee Phan, Susan Choi, and Jhumpa Lahiri.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-277 Necropolitics in the Age of Slavery

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Slave narratives of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries partook of white abolitionist discourse, rhetoric, and genres even as authors made space for their own ideas about freedom, captivity, sovereignty, power, gender, sexuality, and the nature of being. This course will read narratives by Cugoano, Equiano, Sanchez, Prince, Brent, and Craft alongside current critical theories about necropolitics (i.e., sovereignty as the right to kill), Afro-pessimism, Afro-futurism, and Afro- feminism, by theorists such as Mbembe, Wilderson, Moten, Sharpe, and Wynter, to consider what thoughts these authors can offer to us on ways of being, living, and surviving Western, racial imperialisms.

Crosslisted as: CST-249AS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: No previous theory-reading experience is necessary, but a desire to learn to read it.

ENGL-280 Literary and Cultural Theory

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to literary and cultural theory with an emphasis on twentieth century and contemporary thought. We will explore crucial questions that have focused, and continue to focus, critical debate. These questions may include representation, subjectivity, ideology, identity, difference, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and nation. Throughout we will be particularly interested in the ways in which language and form mediate and construct social experience.

Crosslisted as: CST-280
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-282 Writing London: the Modern City Novel

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will chart London's progress from the center of an empire to a node in the global world's economy, and the novel's movement from realism to postmodernism and beyond. Beginning by contrasting the London of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes with that of Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, we will then trace the development of a multiethnic city in which according to a recent report there are more than 300 languages spoken in London schools. By so doing we will also examine the history and tradition of the twentieth and twenty-first century novel and investigate its various theories, genres, and styles.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENGL-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENGL-301 Studies in Journalism

ENGL-301DM Studies in Journalism: 'Bots, Bytes, Tweets, and Snaps: Digital Media and the Transformation of Journalism in the 21st Century'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines the profound changes that journalism has undergone in the digital age. Students will study the impact of technology on journalism historically, focusing on how each age establishes its own vocabulary and syntax. They will then focus on changes that have arrived in our own time, on how the internet, social media, and the cell phone have delivered the tools of journalism beyond the professional class to ordinary citizens and how this has both enhanced and frustrated the role of the journalist in our society. Students will do their own journalism work in various new media forms and develop skills that will make them both better consumers of digital media and better digital media journalist.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: ENGL-202 Intro to Journalism strongly recommended
Notes: Meets English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-301MW Studies in Journalism: 'Magazine Writing - Sequence I'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students in this class will produce original works at magazine length. Assignments will get them out of the classroom and into the world, exploring feature stories and local issues of importance. A student's mastery of the chosen topic will rest on personal observation, extensive interviews, and deep research. All pieces produced will go through multiple drafts. Readings are designed to shape classroom discussion and lend inspiration. These will include classics of the genre, as well as material from current issues of the in the New Yorker, Slate, Atlantic Monthly, Vanity Fair, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, and other publications.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: Intro to Journalism, Intro to Creative Writing, or Narrative-Non Fiction.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-302 Nonfiction Writing

ENGL-303 Short Story Writing II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This workshop is for students seriously engaged in writing short stories. Students will refine their technical skills and work on the subtleties of style. Extensive readings are required.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
The department
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-203, or submitted writing sample and permission of instructor.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-306 Advanced Projects in Creative Writing

Spring. Credits: 4

This semester-long course is designed for students already at work on a longer project (a novel or novella, a short story collection, a collection of poems, longform creative nonfiction, a graphic novel, or a hybrid form). Students will build on the skills and insights gained in previous creative writing courses to draft, workshop, and revise a full-length creative manuscript. Workshop and revision will comprise much of our time, along with readings on craft by authors such as Lynda Barry, Italo Calvino, and Samuel R. Delany. Students will also have an opportunity to meet literary publishing professionals.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: ENGL-201 or equivalent.
Advisory: Interested students must complete this application: https://forms.gle/TzGB5tfBiQtGshXW9
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-311 Chaucer: Stories & Storytellers

ENGL-311CT Chaucer: 'The Canterbury Tales'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Known as a storyteller par excellence, Chaucer was also a famous reader of classical epic, romance, and philosophy. This research seminar will give students the opportunity to read the Canterbury Tales in light of the work's cultural, historical, and literary contexts. Throughout the semester, students will engage with Chaucer's tales and his favorite sources to examine and discuss his representations of gender and class, his perspectives on religious authority, his use of the English vernacular, and his commitment to poetry.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Prereq: ENGL-199.
Advisory: English 213 strongly recommended
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-312 Shakespeare

ENGL-312SF Shakespeare: 'Shakespeare and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will read plays by Shakespeare, watch films based on those plays, and study the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. 'Shakespeare' comes first, of course, both historically and as the source/inspiration for the films. Yet each film has its own existence, to be understood not just as an 'adaptation,' but also as the product of linked artistic, technical, and economic choices. Considering Shakespeare's plays as pre-texts (rather than pre-scriptions), we will look at early and recent films, both those that follow closely conventionalized conceptualizations of 'Shakespeare,' and those that tend to erase or emend their Shakespearean sources.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330SF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level, including ENGL-211.
Notes: does not meet English department seminar requirement; does not meet English dept pre-1700 requirement

ENGL-314 The Curious Middle Ages

Spring. Credits: 4

Curiosity suggests both a yearning for knowledge and the discernment of something unusual or strange. While influenced by Augustine's warning that worldly inquiry could endanger the pilgrimage of the soul, medieval literature contains many instances of curious looking. Exploring the medieval desire to know, this course considers how the period's tendencies toward spiritual and metaphysical thought are balanced against its fascinations with the observable world. We will study the ways allegories, travel narratives, romances, and dream visions intersect with natural philosophy, historiography, cartography, and architecture. Literary analysis is the basis for our investigative work to uncover the epistemological impulses that inform medieval art and literature. Some critical concepts will preoccupy us as we examine this body of literature as literature -- among them: lyric, history, romance, vernacular and secular poetry, courtly love, mysticism, and dream vision poetry.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English including ENGL-199.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-317 Studies in Renaissance Literature

ENGL-319 The Renaissance

ENGL-319CR The Renaissance: 'The Cunning Renaissance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In Renaissance English, "cunning" meant many more things than it does today: guile, but also wisdom, imagination, strategic sense, inventiveness, skill. This very diverse set of abilities is on display throughout early modern literature, in which we meet all sorts of sages, schemers, illusionists, and fools. What does it mean to be smart? What forms of knowledge are privileged above others? How is the idea of intelligence culturally constructed, how inflected by religion, gender, and class? Reading widely in the period and drawing also on modern thought, we will cover such topics as mental disability, moral knowledge, social dexterity, politicking, and artificial and animal intelligence.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Notes: meets English department pre-1700; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-319SR The Renaissance: 'Literature and Science, 1516-1674'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar traces intersections between literary art and scientific knowledge at the dawn of modernity, when the difference between "art" and "science" was anything but clear. We will read prominent works of English Renaissance literature (Shakespeare, Donne, Milton) alongside various scientific and philosophical writings (Lucretius, Bacon, Descartes) as well as major milestones of the Scientific Revolution (Vesalius, Copernicus, Galileo). In so doing, we will ponder what connects aesthetic and empirical forms of truth. Topics will include magic and the occult, alchemy, astronomy, anatomy and medicine, atoms and theories of matter, the scientific method, natural history, and technology.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in Renaissance studies.
Notes: meets English department pre-1700; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-321 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature

ENGL-321WD Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: 'William Wordsworth and George Eliot'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

William Wordsworth and George Eliot grew up in a revolutionary age: the American Revolution, the French Revolution, the Haitian Revolution, wars of independence and of imperial conquest, and, behind it all, the social transformations arising from the industrial revolution. Both Wordsworth and Eliot wrestled with how to adapt their art to these new realities: he introduced dramatically new content into poetry and experimented with a startling variety of poetic forms; she transformed the various prose genres to construct a novelistic form able to represent the totality of British society. By so doing, they forged a revolution in literary forms with the emergence of the modern lyric and the realist novel.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Prereq: 8 credits from English.
Notes: meets the English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-323 Gender and Class in the Victorian Novel

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will investigate how gender and class serve as structuring principles in the development of the Victorian novel in Britain, paying attention to the ways in which the form also develops in relation to emerging ideas about sexuality, race, nation, and religion. Novelists include Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, and Gaskell and we will read examples of domestic fiction, detective fiction, social realist novels, and the Victorian gothic.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333SS
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; does not meet English department seminar requirement

ENGL-324 British Literature Since 1945

ENGL-325 Victorian Literature and Visual Culture

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine literary texts that represent new forms of visuality in nineteenth-century Britain as well as examples of visual culture that provide a framework for reading Victorian culture in innovative ways. We will study nineteenth-century photography--portraiture, prison photography, imperial photographs, and private and popular erotic images--as well as novels and autobiographical writing that engage with new photographic technology and its transformation of the ways in which Victorians understood identity, politics, aesthetics, and representation. The course will take a similar approach to painting, literary illustration, political cartoons and caricature, and advertising.

Crosslisted as: CST-349VC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: Take 4 credits in English at the 300 level.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-328 Woolf, Auden, and Modernism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will chart the development of Modernism in poetry and prose by examining the careers of two of the most important writers in the first half of the twentieth-century: the novelist, Virginia Woolf and the poet, W. H. Auden. We will focus on the way both writers initially seek to wrestle into representation new content within the frame of pre-existing forms and, by so doing, discover that these forms are inadequate or buckle under the strain and need to be revised, renewed, and transformed.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman
Prereq: 8 credits from English.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-334 Asian American Film and Visual Culture

ENGL-334BG Asian American Film and Visual Culture: 'Beyond Geishas and Kung Fu Masters'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines contemporary Asian American film and visual culture through the lens of cultural recovery, self-invention, and experimentation. Focusing primarily on film and photography, we will explore issues of race and visuality, Hollywood orientalism, memory and postmemory, and racial impersonation and parody. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical and critical approaches. Artists may include Nikki S. Lee, Margaret Cho, Tseng Kwong Chi, Jin-me Yoon, Justin Lin, Binh Dahn, Richard Fung, Mira Nair, Deepa Mehta, and Alice Wu.

Crosslisted as: CST-349BG
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-338 Aesthetics of Racial Capitalism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Race is the modality in which class is lived," wrote the late cultural theorist Stuart Hall. This course takes Hall's axiom as a starting point for considering the racial, gendered, and sexualized character of capitalist domination. Throughout the course students will explore both the political economy and the cultural imagery of racial capitalism. One question we will grapple with is the following: if capital itself is as imperceptible and objectively real as gravity, what are the common tropes we use to apprehend its circulation? Is it the stock market ticker tape, the shipping container, or the industrial wasteland? Drawing on writers and artists of color from around the world, we will consider ways they offer cognitive maps of the gendered and sexualized contours of racial capitalism. Authors may include Octavia Butler, Chang-rae Lee, Leslie Marmon Silko, Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, and Ruth Ozeki. Visual artists may include Xu Bing, Otobong Nkanga, Allan deSouza, Rodney McMillian, Mark Bradford, Takahiro Iwasaki, Anicka Yi, and Candace Lin.

Crosslisted as: CST-349AR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
I. Day
Prereq: 8 credits in English or CST-200.
Notes: meets English department semiar requirement

ENGL-346 Irish Gothic

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This advanced seminar will study the gothic as a genre and as a malleable yet persistent discursive site in Irish literary and political tradition. From the eighteenth century to the present, the gothic has been used to explore aspects of Irish history, in particular colonialism. The course will focus on texts that engage with three primary problems that the Irish gothic is used to explore: violence and terror, famine, and vampirism as a political metaphor. We will read novels, short fiction, poetry, and archival newspaper writing, including work by Maturin, Edgeworth, Lady Wilde, Mangan, LeFanu, Stoker, Joyce, Bowen, Enright, Deane, Boland, and Heaney.

Crosslisted as: CST-346
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Martin
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-347 Modern Urban British Novel

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

As London and the British novel enter the new millennium, both are sites of competing histories, traditions, and agendas. This course will map the city's progress from the center of an empire to a node in the global world's economy, and chart the twentieth-century novel's movement from realism to postmodernism and beyond. Beginning by contrasting the realist London of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes with Virginia Woolf's modernist version in Mrs. Dalloway, we will go on to trace the development of the post-1945 British novel.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Alderman
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English including ENGL-199.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-349 Cosmopolitanism

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Nothing that is human can be alien to me." This is the motto of cosmopolitanism, a philosophy first formed by the Greeks, which emphasizes our common status as citizens of the world and urges us to value the universal as highly as the local. Today, this view can seem naïve: is it advisable, even possible, to privilege absent strangers and lofty ideals above the needs of those nearby? This course considers the promise and perils of cosmopolitanism through the lens of contemporary transnational literature-through representations of immigration, asylum, transnational capital, tourism, terrorism, and environmentalism. Authors may include Rushdie, Naipaul, Coetzee, Adichie, Hemon, and Bulawayo.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: does not fulfill the English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-350 Studies in African American Literature

ENGL-350TM Topics in African American Literature: 'Toni Morrison'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the work and the centralized black world of the last American Nobel laureate in literature, Toni Morrison. Morrison is the author of eleven novels and multiple other works, including nonfiction and criticism. In a career that has spanned over forty years and has informed countless artists and writers, Morrison's expansive cultural reach can hardly be measured accurately. In this course we will endeavor to critically analyze the arc and the import of many of Morrison's writings. Readings include: The Bluest Eye, Sula, Song of Solomon, Jazz, Playing in the Dark, Paradise, and A Mercy.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-341TM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Bailey
Prereq: 4 credits in English or Africana Studies.
Notes: meets English dept seminar requirement

ENGL-353 Readings in Literary Biography

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Biography is both a literary genre and a mode of literary scholarship. This course will explore some varieties of the biographical impulse in both fiction and nonfiction. We will begin with eighteenth-century models: Samuel Johnson and James Boswell. Then we will examine Freud's influence on Bloomsbury writers like Lytton Strachey and Virginia Woolf. We will conclude with experiments in biography by writers such as Gertrude Stein and Janet Malcolm, along with some attention to biographical writing today.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
C. Benfey
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the department.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-354 Vindicated: The Wollstonecraft-Shelley Circle

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The dynamic mother-daughter duo of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley is often read as part of the "Godwin-Shelley circle," a cadre of writers circulating around their respective literary husbands. This course will place them at the center of literary innovation, examining their expansive work in multiple genres. Asking what it means to be ardent and provocative women writers during this period, we will discuss their radical politics, their gender theories, and their ideas about literature intervening in the public sphere. We will also consider short pieces by others in their circle, potentially including Godwin, P. Shelley, Mary Hayes, Mary Robinson, Claire Claremont, and Byron.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-361 Advanced Creative Writing Topics

ENGL-361EX Advanced Creative Writing Topics: 'Beyond Measure: Experiments in the Music of Poetry'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The workshop will examine the overlapping impulses of poetry, music, and sound-making. Through the work of a variety of artists, such as LaMonte Young, John Cage, Mahalia Jackson, Beethoven, Gertrude Stein, Webern, Meredith Monk, Laurie Anderson, Phillip Glass, Nathaniel Mackey, Tracie Morris, Clark Coolidge, Fred Moten, Dylan Thomas, Allen Ginsburg, Harmony Holiday, and others, we will investigate the realm between language and music. We will explore how voice, rhythm, song, repetition, phrasing, musical form, and the management of time are vital to a poem's semantic content. This will be a generative writing workshop, with an emphasis on new composition.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Prereq: A 200-level creative writing course.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-361HY Advanced Creative Writing Topics: 'Hybrid Genre Writing'

Fall. Credits: 4

Students will read and discuss a diverse array of hybrid-genre works or writing that combines and coalesces two or more genres: poetry, fiction, criticism, and/or memoir. Some books will also cross media incorporating painting, photography, or film. Students will consider how drawing upon different prose, verse, and multi-media modes can complement and augment the way writers shape their personal and political stories and will complete writing, speaking, and other assignments designed to build toward a hybrid-genre work. Everyone will give and receive critique in a workshop environment, expand approaches to drafting, and revise work for the final assignment.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distrib. Rqmt; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Hong
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENGL-201.

ENGL-361PM Advanced Creative Writing Topics: 'Poetry and Image: Formations of Identity'

Spring. Credits: 4

With an emphasis on producing creative texts, the course will examine the parallel and often overlapping impulses of poetry and image-making (photography, painting, and other visual arts). We will explore concepts of identity through the work of artists such as Alice Neel, Mikalene Thomas, Claude Cahun, Cindy Sherman, Kehinde Wiley, Glenn Ligon, Catherine Opie, Kara Walker, Diane Arbus, Vivian Maier, and Nan Goldin. Writers will include Ocean Vuong, Danez Smith, Sherwin Bitsui, Robert Seydel, Ari Banias, Safia Elhillo, Gloria Anzaldua, Morgan Parker, Layli Longsoldier, Judy Grahn, Audre Lorde, Ronaldo Wilson, Shane McCrae, Adrienne Rich, David Wojnarowisz, Eileen Myles, and others.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333PM
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distrib. Rqmt; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Ace
Prereq: A 200-level creative writing course.
Notes: Meets the English department's seminar requirement.

ENGL-361SW Advanced Creative Writing Topics: 'Screenwriting'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The screenplay is a unique and ephemeral form that exists as a blueprint for something else: a finished film. How do you convey on the page a story that will take shape within an audio-visual medium? The screenwriter must have an understanding of both the language of narrative film as well as the general shape and mechanics of film stories. This advanced course will cover dialogue, characterization, plot, story arc, genre, and cinematic structure. We will analyze scenes from fictional narrative films -- both short and feature length -- and read the scripts that accompany these films. By the end of this course, each student will have written two original short films. In workshop style, the class will serve as practice audience for table readings of drafts and writing exercises.

Crosslisted as: FMT-340SW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Montague
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Film Studies.
Advisory: Preference will be given to majors. Application and permission of instructor required.

ENGL-362 Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group

Spring. Credits: 4

This seminar will examine the Bloomsbury Group, the most important British cultural formation in the first half of the twentieth-century. The group included artists, art critics, biographers, economists, literary critics, novelists, philosophers and translators such as Vanessa Bell, E. M. Forster, John Maynard Keynes, George Moore, Bertrand Russell, Lytton Strachey, and Virginia Woolf. We will emphasize the ways in which they sought to dismantle the artistic, political, and sexual repressions of the Victorian period and to replace them with new forms of art, community, and society.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
N. Alderman
Prereq: 8 credits in the English department.
Notes: meets English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-366 Love, Sex, and Death in the Anthropocene, or Living Through the Age of Climate Change and Other Disasters

Fall. Credits: 4

The "Anthropocene" has been defined as the era when humans exert change on the earth's climate, but this term has become a dynamo for theories, political discussions, and art about man's anthropocentric relation to the nonhuman world. This course will read theories of the Anthropocene alongside artistic contemplations of the shifting, ethical relations among humans, animals, and other beings of the world. How are we to live, die, and reproduce ourselves in a time when we have egregiously affected the earth? How does the critique of anthropocentrism shift our understanding of sex, gender, race, and the nonhuman? Finally, how does art speak within political conversations of climate change?

Crosslisted as: CST-349AN, GNDST-333AN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Singer
Prereq: 8 credits in English or Critical Social Thought.
Notes: meets English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-367 Topics in Film Studies

ENGL-367AD Topics in Film Studies: 'Adaptation: A Study in Form'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The Oxford English Dictionary defines "adaptation" as "the bringing of two things together so as to effect a change in the nature of the objects." Rather than studying adaptation as a project that attempts to reproduce an original work in another medium, our course considers the complex relationship between narratives and their retellings and revisions. In particular, we will focus on how such retellings permanently alter their so-called "source" material and how each incarnation of a given narrative offers us insight into and commentary upon a particular historical moment and its unique political and ideological challenges. We will also consider the ways in which literary and visual representations differ in their communicative and affective mechanisms, and challenge where we draw the line between "art," "history," and "entertainment.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330AD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English or in Film, Media, Theater.

ENGL-367CM Topics in Film Studies: 'Contemporary Masculinities on Stage and Screen'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores postmodern American masculinity as it is constructed and disseminated through contemporary film and theater. Students will study contemporary theories of masculinity as well as portrayals of masculinity, in its various forms, for both stage and screen. In addition, we will explore what is at stake (culturally, ideologically, and economically) in perpetuating certain masculine archetypes, and what "new" representations have arisen in the past few decades. Finally, we will consider the ways in which film and theater imagines masculinity to intersect with race, gender, and class, and the limitations of that representational archive.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330CM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Prereq: FMT-102 (or FLMST-201) or FMT-106 (or THEAT-100).
Notes: fulfills English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-372 Gender and War in American Narrative

Spring. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on depictions of war in the context of gender. When asked how we might prevent war, Virginia Woolf suggested that we must invent new language and methods rather than follow the path of the traditional "procession of educated men." What language emerges in works about the effects of war? Texts will include essays and films as well as selected works by writers such as Alcott, Whitman, Crane, Twain, Hemingway, Woolf, Silko, Morrison, and O'Brien.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333AM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits beyond the 100 level in English or Gender Studies.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-373 Women in American Literature

ENGL-373DH Women in American Literature: 'Desperate Housewives in 19th- through early 20th-century American Literature'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will explore visual and literary images of nineteenth through early 20th-century marriage and motherhood. Discussion of Virginia's Woolf's 'A Room of One's Own' and Barbara Welter's essay 'The Cult of True Womanhood' will serve as the springboard for our focus on representations of women in the home. We will incorporate a visit to the art museum, and will analyze film adaptations of some of the texts we read. The course will focus primarily on American literature, film, and art, with the exception of Ibsen's A Doll's House; selected written texts will include works by writers such as Hawthorne, James, Stowe, Gilman, Freeman, Chopin, Hurston, and Wharton.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333DH
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-373NT Women in American Literature: 'A Landscape of One's Own: Nature and Gender in American Literature (Nineteenth and Twentieth Century)'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on portrayals of women in nineteenth through mid-twentieth century America, particularly in the context of nature and landscape. We will explore how women, often objectified in visual images of the period, appropriated established devices or developed new images and structures to represent womanhood in their own terms. Texts will include selected poetry, sketches, autobiographical essays or memoirs, short stories, novels, paintings, films, and photography. With Thoreau as our springboard, we will focus on women who told the stories of their lives in the context of islands, deserts, prairies and forests of the United States.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333MM, ENVST-373WN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-373SC Women in American Literature: 'Landscape and Loss in 20th-21st Century American Narrative'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will focus on 20th-21st Century American narratives on landscape. In the context of a history tainted by destruction, and in the face of environmental concerns today, the course will explore the struggle to sustain an authentic connection with the natural world. Through a study of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, film, and art, students will address a range of questions. Does the history of loss within the American landscape carry particular challenges for writers and artists wishing to establish new definitions of what it means to work toward preservation? Does nature-writing in American narrative become a source of celebration, a love affair with landscape, or an expression of grief, a means of mourning? To what extent does gender, race, or class influence the shape of modern and contemporary narratives on the American landscape?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-374 Hitchcock and After

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330HA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film, Media, Theater and 4 credits in English.
Notes: meets English Department seminar requirement

ENGL-378 Another World Is Possible: Writing Utopias

Fall. Credits: 4

How and why do narrative artists envision whole new worlds? What is the role of fantasy in social change? How can we make art about social change in the middle of a global crisis? In this course we will investigate contemporary utopian fictions and their historical antecedents as models for our own utopian writing. We will encounter novels and films from various lineages, including Afrofuturist, anarchist, critical utopian, ecotopian, and feminist. Authors we may read include Sir Thomas More, Ursula K. Le Guin, Samuel R. Delany, Ernest Callenbach, Octavia E. Butler, Walidah Imarisha, Carolina De Robertis, and Margaret Kiljoy. Interdisciplinary research and collaboration will make up a substantial portion of the work of the course.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: 4 credits in creative writing and either 4 additional credits in English or 4 credits in Gender Studies, Africana Studies, Critical Social Thought, Latina/o Studies, or Environmental Studies.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement. This course is in conversation with Kate Singer's ENGL-366 Love, Sex, and Death in the Anthropocene, or Living Through the Age of Climate Change and Other Disasters.

ENGL-382 Topic

ENGL-382PW Topic: 'Once More With Feeling: Intimacies and Affects in a Posthuman World'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Affect theory offers a varied and rich critical language to explore how emotion circulates within and among human bodies-and nonhuman ones as well. If emotions operate through bodily changes and chemical exchanges, then animals and nonhumans might similarly be seen as bodies replete with affective materials in motion and at rest. In this course we will read through an array of affect theory from cognitive science, animal studies, and posthumanist debates on the affect of objects. We will consider how humans know what they feel (and when), how animals love, how forests think, and how affects might cross human and nonhuman boundaries.

Crosslisted as: CST-349PW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: Prior experience with theory is helpful but not necessary.
Notes: meets English Department seminar requirement

ENGL-389 Revolution and Change in the Age of Necropolitics

Spring. Credits: 4

The "age of revolution" saw revolts in the Black Atlantic world: Americans rebelled against the British; Native Americans opposed white colonists; bourgeoisie vied for power against the aristocracy; women decried patriarchal imprisonment; Latin American creoles resisted Spanish imperialists; and slaves threw off their masters. This course considers these diverse narratives of revolution as a series of social, political, and philosophical movements to change "biopolitics" (control of life) and "necropolitics" (control via death). We will read revolutionary tracts, slave narratives, and abolitionary literature alongside critical theory to consider how these authors offer ways of living and surviving Western, racial imperialisms.

Crosslisted as: CST-349NC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits combined in English, critical social thought, history, or Africana studies.
Notes: meets English department 1700-1900 requirement; meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-392 Advanced Topics in English

ENGL-392NP Advanced Topics in English: 'World Literature and the Nobel Prize'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Alfred Nobel intended for the Nobel Prize in Literature to be awarded to "the most outstanding work in an ideal direction." In this course, we will use the Nobel Prize in Literature as a way of thinking about the fields of World Literature and Global Anglophone Literature. We will read works by Nobel Prize winners such as Kazuo Ishiguro, Doris Lessing, Alice Munro, Kenzaburo Oe, and Toni Morrison and analyze cultural and critical theory by Arjun Appadurai and Rebecca Walkowitz. We will examine narrative form and cultural and historical contexts, while considering what these authors reveal about the changing sensibilities of the Academy and the construction of "world literature" today.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English.
Notes: Does not meet English department's seminar requirement

ENGL-392YB Advanced Topics in English: 'The Yellow Robot: Race, Fembots, and Sexuality'

Spring. Credits: 4

Saudi Arabia recently became the first nation to grant citizenship to a female cyborg, prompting criticism that the robot now has more rights than women in the country. This class will explore issues at the intersections of race, power, gender, sexuality, and technology. We will read theorists such as Wendy Chun and Lisa Nakamura on race and technology, as well as Anne Cheng's work on race, aesthetics, and the nonhuman. We will also consider films such as Ex Machina and The Ghost in the Shell against Koreeda's Air Doll, and Kwak Jae-Yong's Cyborg, She. How are intelligence and humanity proscribed by race? What do gender, sexuality, and race have to do with mechanized labor?

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333YB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Tan
Prereq: 8 credits in English, gender studies, or critical social thought.
Notes: meets English department seminar requirement

ENGL-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENVST-100 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the field of environmental studies and to some of the scientific, historical, political, economic and cultural aspects of environmental concerns. Through interdisciplinary lenses, we explore the complexities of many issues and problems such as climate change, threats to biodiversity, and toxic environments. In addition to fostering an understanding of their origins, the course focuses on potential solutions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Albertine, T. Farnham

ENVST-104 Renewable Energy

Spring. Credits: 4

We will examine the feasibility of converting the entire energy infrastructure of the US from one that is dependent on fossil fuels to one that utilizes mostly renewable sources of energy. We will examine the potential scale of energy production and the associated costs, natural resource requirements and land usage needs for both renewables, such as solar, wind and biofuel, and non-renewables, such as coal, natural gas, petroleum and nuclear. By applying extensive use of basic algebra and an elementary understanding of the physical processes underpinning each energy technology, we will arrive at a number of urgent conclusions about the challenges facing our energy infrastructure.

Crosslisted as: PHYS-104
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Arango

ENVST-150 Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies

ENVST-150DV Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Introduction to the Histories and Theories of Development'

Spring. Credits: 4

What is so compelling about the idea of development? Why does it fail much of the global south? Do colonialism and capitalism have anything to do with it? Why do hunger, poverty, inequality, unemployment, and ecological crises persist in the so-called developed world? What are the parameters of the proposed solutions to underdevelopment such as neoliberal market reforms versus those of alternative models? What are the connections between development and environmental issues? development and war? Can development be sustainable? Are gender and race incidental or central to these issues? This course engages these questions through readings, lectures, discussions, and writing assignments.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise

ENVST-150PH Introductory Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Introduction to Environmental and Public Health'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers a broad introduction to the problems and solutions in the field of environmental and public health. Students will read about and discuss issues that occur in both industrialized and developing countries. Topics include the biological, physical, and chemical agents of environmental contamination; methods used in epidemiology and toxicology to evaluate environmental hazards; policies currently in place to reduce health risks and protect populations from exposure; and emerging global environmental health problems.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Albertine

ENVST-181 From Local to Global: Food Justice and the Challenge of Feeding 10 Billion People

Fall. Credits: 4

Humans currently produce enough food to feed the 7.6 billion people on Earth. Despite this fact, 815 million people went hungry in 2017 and this number is on the rise. With a growing population, we will need to increase food production, but first we must fix our current food system and ensure equitable food access for all peoples. This class will frame the problem at the local and global scales by covering topics including: food security; food sovereignty; food justice; and the connections between race, food, and health. We will then investigate how to create an equitable and sustainable food system, with a focus on urban community gardening in cities and towns close to Mount Holyoke.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
J. Albertine
Notes: This course will include field trips on Friday afternoons. This course can be taken for 200-level credit through a community-based learning optional component.

ENVST-200 Environmental Science

Fall. Credits: 4

Most of the environmental challenges we face are complex and interdisciplinary in nature. This course introduces students to the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to both understand the interrelationships of the natural world, as well as to identify and analyze environmental problems and think critically about alternative solutions for addressing them. Key concepts from ecology, biogeochemistry, and other fields inform our study of climate change, water resources, soil sustainability, food production, and other topics. Fundamental and emerging issues are examined using regional case studies, hands-on problem solving, and field and laboratory experiments in this interdisciplinary field-based course.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Ballantine
Restrictions: This course is limited to Environmental Studies majors.; Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One 100-level lab science. Coreq: ENVST-200L.
Advisory: One course in statistics is recommended.
Notes: Pre-registration will open to environmental studies majors only. In the second week of pre-registration, remaining seats and waitlisting will be open to all sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

ENVST-210 Political Ecology

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course will explore the historical, political, economic, social, and cultural contexts in which human-environment interactions occur. We will cover critical topics and trends in the field of political ecology, from its early manifestations to more recent expansions. Using case studies from the global south and north, we will discuss factors that shape social and environmental change across scales from the personal to the global, and we will examine the role of gender, race, class, and power in struggles over resources. Students will become familiar with the academic debates in which political ecologists are engaged, and they will apply the concepts discussed in a case of their choice.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-222 Reading North American Landscapes

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We explore the origin and anatomy of North America's most distinctive landscapes, including many national parks and monuments. We "visit" spectacular locales, including Yosemite, Yellowstone, and the Grand Canyon. We also consider how the continent's geologic character has influenced human action and experience. By "reading" the land we can see the complex layering of natural and cultural histories that influence a "sense of place." Reading the land can also provide a sense of how various peoples have used and shaped Earth's surface differently, and how these differences have contributed to a spectrum of environmental impacts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Savoy
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 4 credits from geology or a related subject; or high school earth science.
Advisory: Priority given to students in Environmental Studies.
Notes: This course is reading intensive.

ENVST-233 Topics in Environmental Studies

ENVST-233CS Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Introduction to Environmental Entrepreneurship: Campus Sustainability'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Mount Holyoke has recognized our role in global resource use and has a strong sustainability mission, with the goal to become carbon neutral by 2037. This course is a project-based experiential learning course that will use the Mount Holyoke campus as a case study to find solutions. Entrepreneurial teams will identify environmental hotspots on campus through use of existing datasets as well as collect additional needed data. We will then identify solutions that can be implemented over the short-term and at minimal cost to increase campus sustainability as well as identify larger projects for the future. Students will use entrepreneurship methods to assess projects for cost and feasibility.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
J. Albertine
Prereq: Any 100-level ENVST course, or any EOS course, or FYSEM-110PH. Coreq: ENVST-233CSL.

ENVST-233EP Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Environmental Pollution'

Spring. Credits: 4

Humans are increasing the amount of pollutants in the environment, particularly through the burning of fossil fuels and other industrial practices. As human population increases exponentially, our consumption and production of waste and pollution do the same. This class will investigate where the pollutants come from, their presence in the environment, and the biological effects of these pollutants. There will be a special emphasis on how the pollutants that humans produce feed back to affect human health. While this class is primarily science based, we will also address topics in environmental justice and environmental policy.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Albertine
Prereq: ENVST-100, ENVST-150PH, or other 100-level science course.

ENVST-233PE Topics in Environmental Studies: 'Political Economy of the Environment'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course addresses environmental protection and environmental degradation, including both pollution and natural resource depletion. In addition to the neoclassical economic question of how scarce resources are allocated among competing ends, this course explores the political economy question of how resources are allocated among competing individuals, groups, and classes. Topics include the goals of environmental policy, globalization, poverty, natural assets, and climate policy. A fundamental conclusion is that the relationships between people and nature are largely determined by the relationships between people.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
M. Boyd
Prereq: ENVST-100 or ECON-110.

ENVST-240 The Value of Nature

Spring. Credits: 4

Through this seminar, students develop an in-depth knowledge of and articulate vocabulary for the significant and diverse ways that humans value the natural world - utilitarian, scientific, aesthetic, naturalistic, symbolic, ethical, and spiritual. We use these different typologies of human environmental values as frameworks for readings and discussion, extending our examination to historical and cultural variations in values, competing perspectives of the natural world, and other value concepts, including intrinsic and transformative value. We examine the concept of biophilia and probe the role values play in the concern over losses of biological diversity and its implications.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
T. Farnham
Prereq: ENVST-100.

ENVST-241 Environmental Issues

Spring. Credits: 4

In this course, we will explore the different facets of numerous environmental policy issues and review the substantive aspects, legal themes, and regulatory structure of the major federal environmental laws. The laws covered in this course include the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and others. The course objectives are for the student to learn the basic regulatory characteristics of the major laws and to become well-versed in the current environmental issues which we will focus upon throughout the semester, such as global climate change, ocean degradation, energy resources, and biodiversity loss.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
T. Farnham
Prereq: ENVST-100, or ENVST-150PH, or ENVST-150DV.

ENVST-242 Global-Local Inequality and the Environment

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will engage students in thinking about the dynamic relationship between inequality and the environment. We will examine some of the major theories, paradigms, concepts, policies, and programs that analyze, explain, predict or attempt to affect change in the global South. As we discuss the evolution of development theories and practices over time, we will reflect on how its theoretical underpinnings help us to understand policy and programmatic "successes" and "failures." The first part of the course introduces students to philosophical and theoretical debates about inequality and resource access, drawing on development theory to explore evolving approaches to integrate environment and development. We will consider complementary and contrasting perspectives about the causes of and solutions to global poverty and environmental degradation and reflect on how our assumptions shape what we "see" in specific sites, how we frame particular problems and what we suggest as solutions. As we trace approaches to sustainable development from global environmental politics to site-specific case studies, the second half of the course connects through a series of virtual conversations about inequality and the environment with the Mount Holyoke College program in Costa Rica.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Corson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: One course in geography or one related social sciences course.

ENVST-243 Rural Prosperity in the African Past

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course seeks to understand what relationships engendered rural prosperity in African communities in the past, and what processes of change have led millions of rural people to abandon their homes and livelihoods to join flows of migrants to cities and other nations. We examine African patterns of production over the long term and the transformation of African agriculture in the last two centuries, considering famine, the social and political organization of access to productive resources, and the relationship of rural and urban communities. We ask how rural prosperity might be recreated in the 21st century.

Crosslisted as: HIST-243, AFCNA-243
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
The department

ENVST-267 Reading and Writing in the World

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to reading and writing about "environment", this seminar will attempt an exchange across distinct approaches to observing and describing the world around us. Do lenses of culture, discipline, and gender impact how we see and experience nature, environment, and place? Course work will include reading such authors as N. Scott Momaday, Jamaica Kincaid, Leslie Marmon Silko, Mary Oliver, Terry Tempest Williams, Wendell Berry, Henry David Thoreau, Frederck Douglass; and many others; field trips; and writing assignments--weekly field notes and journals, analytical papers, and personal essays.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-267
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form. Please try to apply during advising week.

ENVST-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

ENVST-316 Restoration Ecology

Spring. Credits: 4

A key test of our ecological knowledge is whether we can successfully apply it to create or restore ecosystems that have been damaged or destroyed. As we take on the role of restoration ecologists this semester, we will use principles and methods of ecology, conservation biology, hydrology, soil science, and related disciplines to learn about the theory, practice, and politics of ecosystem restoration. This course emphasizes fieldwork, interdisciplinary teamwork, and ecological planning to evaluate and design restoration projects in our surrounding communities and regional landscapes. On a few occasions, meetings may last until 5:05 pm so that we can go on fieldtrips that are farther from campus.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
K. Ballantine
Prereq: ENVST-200 or at least 8 credits of 200 or 300-level laboratory science.

ENVST-317 Perspectives on American Environmental History

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We explore the history of human-environment interactions in North America from precolonial times to the present from different cultural perspectives. How have such human activities as migration, colonization, and resource use depended on or modified the natural world? How have different cultural perceptions of and attitudes toward environment shifted through time and helped to reshape American landscapes? Case studies include ecological histories of Native America and Euro-America, slavery and land use, wilderness and conservation, and environmental racism and social justice. In addition to historical documents, we also consider scientific studies, literature, visual records, and oral tradition.

Crosslisted as: HIST-317
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form. Please try to apply during advising week. Priority given to juniors and seniors in ENVST, HIST, and GEOG.

ENVST-321 Conference Courses in Environmental Studies

Selected topics in areas of environmental interest, determined by faculty expertise and student needs. Study in small groups or by individual students working with faculty.

ENVST-321CP Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Political Economy of the Environment: Capitalism and Climate Change'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Can an economic system predicated on infinite growth achieve sustainability on a finite planet? This question will likely define the twenty-first century. This course aims to grapple with this paradox, examining the relationships and tensions between the globally dominant form of economy - capitalism - and global climate change. We will explore the interwoven rise of capitalism and emergence of fossil fuel energy, as well as the global expansion of capitalism and the connections between resources, economic growth, and political power. We will engage with various theoretical approaches to capitalism-environment relations, such as metabolic rift theory, the second contradiction of capitalism, and the production of nature thesis. These theories provide insight into recent forms of capitalism (i.e. neoliberalism) and the increasing degradation and commodification of the environment. We end by studying contemporary debates, examining institutions and policies seeking to manage climate change from with liberal-capitalist frameworks, the emergence of the "green economy", and the politics of climate denialism, concluding with alternatives economies and the climate justice movement. This course will provide students with theoretical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding economy-environment relationships.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-321EQ Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Food Equity and Empowerment' Change'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course uses a critical lens to examine the conflicts around equity and justice in our food systems, from production to consumption. Using race, ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic factors as the lens through which to examine the impacts associated with how we grow and consume food, this course seeks to understand an alternative to the dominant Western narrative on food systems. As a class, we will engage with readings, discussion and actual hands-on participation with food equity issues in the Pioneer Valley, so that we can reflect on our own power and privilege in the food system and come to a more holistic understanding of the challenges within the field.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
O. Aguilar
Prereq: 8 credits in Environmental Studies or Geography including ENVST-100.

ENVST-321HC Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Human Health and Climate Change'

Fall. Credits: 4

Climate change presents a global public health problem, with serious health impacts predicted to manifest in varying ways in different parts of the world. Through this course, we will investigate these health effects which include increased respiratory and cardiovascular disease, injuries and premature deaths related to extreme heat, weather, and other disaster events, and changes in the prevalence and geographical distribution of food- and water-borne illnesses and other infectious diseases. We will critically review the literature documenting recent and current impacts and predictions for the future. We will also look at solutions in place for adapting to these changes.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
J. Albertine
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: ENVST-200.

ENVST-321TX Conference Courses in Environmental Studies: 'Toxic Entanglements: Environmental (In)Justice in the United States'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Toxic water in Flint, Michigan. Oil pipelines through sacred sites in North Dakota. These manifestations of environmental injustice and inequality are only the most recent incarnations of larger legacies. Environments are never simply natural or given: they are imbued with unequal entanglements of gender, race, class, and power. Environmental justice asks questions about the ways in which environments are produced, and the relations of risk, harm, benefit, access, privilege, domination, oppression, and liberation therein. In this course, we will study the theory and practice of environmental (in)justice in the United States. We will briefly explore histories of environmental injustice in the U.S. (from colonization and slavery, to industrialization and pollution); past and current struggles over the siting of production facilities, toxic waste, and pollution; and recent events around water (be they floods, toxicity, or protection): Hurricane Katrina, Flint, and Standing Rock. We will pay particular attention to questions of food and justice, examining gender, race, and class in agricultural labor, corporate power in agribusiness, food deserts, food access/health and white privilege, and gender in alternative community food movements.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits from a related subject.

ENVST-335 Wetlands Ecology and Management

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Although they cover ~0.6% of the earth's surface, wetlands perform more ecosystem services per hectare than any other ecosystem type. Alarmingly, over half of the earth's wetlands have been lost to agriculture and development. With these wetlands were also lost the valuable ecosystem functions wetlands perform. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine the biogeochemical, ecological, societal, and regulatory aspects of wetland ecosystems. Group discussion of primary scientific literature, as well as independent experimental design and the writing of a research proposal are core components. Field trips will sometimes keep us until 5:05 pm, and will provide an opportunity to explore these fascinating ecosystems in person.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
K. Ballantine
Prereq: ENVST-200 or at least 8 credits of 200- or 300-level laboratory science.

ENVST-338 History, Race, and the American Land

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Environmental justice is a key concern today. Yet ties between "race" and environment in what is now the U.S. have existed for centuries. In this research seminar we will explore how this country's still-unfolding history, and ideas of race and nature, have marked the land, this society, and each of us as individuals. We will consider Indigenous, colonial European, and African senses of Earth; origins of placenames; contested terrains; migration and displacement; and other topics revealing the place of race. We'll examine often-unrecognized connections, such as the siting of the nation's capital and the economic motives of slavery. None of these links is coincidental and all touch us today.

Crosslisted as: HIST-338
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
L. Savoy
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: ENVST-317.
Advisory: You must apply for admission to this course by completing the online application form. Priority given to juniors and seniors in ENVST, HIST, and GEOG.
Notes: This course is reading intensive.

ENVST-342 Living in the Anthropocene: Development, Technology, Futures

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The concept of the Anthropocene (the "human epoch") signifies that human activity has become the dominant physical force on the planet. Mainstream narratives envision three phases of the Anthropocene: industrial origins (1800 - 1950); global expansion and the nuclear age (1950 - 2000+); and an emergent third phase marked by massive shifts in land-use and biodiversity. This course undertakes a critical examination of the Anthropocene concept. We will analyze debates over geological demarcation, the term itself and the "anthropos" it embodies, and eco-modernist conceptions of a "good" Anthropocene. We aim to historically contextualize the socio-technical phases of the Anthropocene (industrial revolution, post-WWII global expansion, and contemporary globalization), situating them as processes emerging within a specific political-economic context (capitalism). Finally, we examine struggles over the socio-ecological entanglements shaping its future directions: urbanization, industrialized agriculture, genetic technology, and geoengineering/Earth System management. This course explores what it means to live in an era where a subset of one species can determine the conditions of possibility for life on the entire planet.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Surprise
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

ENVST-343 Applied Environmental Geology

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This field-based course focuses on assessing the environmental impact of applied road salt in two local hill towns. Each week we will leave campus to collect snow and water samples along the main road corridors for subsequent lab analysis. Because this course is all about road salt and snow we will brave the coldest and snowiest conditions to collect our samples. Each student will pursue their own independent research project but will work collaboratively with other students in the class.

Crosslisted as: GEOL-343
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Werner
Prereq: GEOG-203 or ENVST-200. Coreq: ENVST-343L.
Advisory: Warm clothes and a good attitude are the main prerequisites for this course.

ENVST-373 Nature and Gender

ENVST-373WN Nature and Gender: 'A Landscape of One's Own: Nature and Gender in American Literature'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will focus on portrayals of women in nineteenth through mid-twentieth century America, particularly in the context of nature and landscape. We will explore how women, often objectified in visual images of the period, appropriated established devices or developed new images and structures to represent womanhood in their own terms. Texts will include selected poetry, sketches, autobiographical essays or memoirs, short stories, novels, paintings, films, and photography. With Thoreau as our springboard, we will focus on women who told the stories of their lives in the context of islands, deserts, prairies and forests of the United States.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-373NT, GNDST-333MM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Glasser
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from the English department.

ENVST-390 Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies

Fall. Credits: 4

This is the capstone course of the environmental studies major. The course explores linkages among the diversity of disciplines that contribute to the environmental studies major, illustrates how these disciplines that contribute to the environmental studies major are used in environmental decision making, enables students to inform one another's roles as environmentalists, and provides students with opportunities to develop individual and cooperative projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
T. Farnham
Restrictions: This course is limited to Environmental Studies majors.

ENVST-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

EOS-210 Opportunities, Impact and Social Entrepreneurship

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Problem identification and analysis, opportunity recognition, and engaging with the local manifestation of global challenges is at the foundation of addressing social and environmental challenges, developing beneficial social impacts, and being engaged in all aspects of entrepreneurship. Students will learn about global-local intersection and about addressing significant problems through team projects to create an action, business, social enterprise or organization that involves local stakeholders and creates solutions. Project-based learning with readings, lectures, and classroom discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-229 Enterprise Startups and Social Entrepreneurship

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This is a project-based experiential learning course teaching entrepreneurial teams to rapidly build, test, and cycle through models on the way to discovering and implementing an organization, designing and providing a product or service, and offering a solution to a global-to-local problem. Students will learn about and engage in the creation and building process, while exploring and discovering key issues in social impact, organizations and groups, creative solutions, economics, and finance. The course will adapt the Lean LaunchPad methodology, involve case-studies, and provide research and analytical articles.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-239 Fundamentals of Business Organizations and Finance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will create and manage organizations, learn from topical lectures, readings and case studies, and hear from guest speakers. The course will cover core organizations: not-for-profits, "C" corporations, "S" corporations, partnerships, and the LLC (limited liability company) plus special variations like workers cooperatives and social venture variations known as benefit corporations and L3C companies. Students will also learn how to analyze and present financial information and gain competency with basic spreadsheets and analytical tools. Finally, students will consider organizations in their social contexts, discussing the relationship of organization types to social issues at global and local scales.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-249 Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Business

Fall. Credits: 4

This course uses the traditional approaches of moral philosophy to explore ethical challenges and obligations faced by individuals, businesses, and organizations in an increasingly complex global environment. Through the consideration of philosophical theories and particular cases we will explore issues such as the nature of a business or organization (are they the kinds of things that have rights and responsibilities, or can be harmed?); rights and responsibilities of workers, managers, and owners; morally acceptable risks; ethical issues in marketing; and making ethical choices in a global business environment.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-260EB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Sizer

EOS-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EOS-295P Independent Study with Practicum

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Instructor permission required.

EOS-299ND Topic: 'Individuals and Organizations'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course focuses on individual and small-group behavior in the organizational setting. The class will focus on: (1) understanding human behavior in an organizational context; (2) understanding of oneself as an individual contributor and/or leader within an organization, and ways to contribute to organizational change; (3) intergroup communication and conflict management; and (4) diversity and organizational climate.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-212
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
B. Packard
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-310 Social Entrepreneurship Capstone

Spring. Credits: 4

Project-based learning course: students bring ideas, projects, and plans to develop toward implementation. Learn about organization startup in social and environmental context. Students engage in class discussions and attend short lectures and, working individually or in teams, develop projects to an implementation stage. Results include having a well-designed solution that delivers real benefit to identified stakeholder(s).

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman, V. Pastala
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EOS-210 or EOS-229.

EOS-349BC Topic: 'History of British Capitalism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a research seminar, designed to introduce students to classic and recent debates on the "history of capitalism" and to support original research on a broad array of topics related to the social and cultural history of economic life. Rather than take British capitalism as exemplary of modernization we will situate that which was particular about the British case against the pluralities of capitalism that have evolved over the past three centuries. Topics include revolutions in agriculture, finance, commerce and manufacturing; the political economy of empire; the relationship between economic ideas, institutions and practice; and, the shaping of economic life by gender, class and race.

Crosslisted as: HIST-357, CST-349BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

EOS-349MV Topic: 'Motivation'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course we will examine multiple theories of motivation and their relevance across a range of organizational settings (including corporations, special programs, and schools or colleges). How do we spark interest in a new subject or inspire people to undertake a challenging project? How do we sustain persistence in ourselves and others? This course is relevant for students interested in motivation, whether for attainment (such as within in human resources, talent development, or management) or for learning (whether for students, teachers, or leaders). Because motivation is closely linked to learning and achievement, in addition to well-being and purpose, we will also consider these topics and more.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-337MV
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in psychology or entrepreneurship, organizations, and society (EOS).

EOS-349NQ Topic: 'Organizations and Inequality'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In Organizations and Inequality, we analyze how organizations create, reproduce, and also potentially challenge social inequalities. Drawing on different organizational perspectives, students will engage the challenges of ethical action in a complex world marked by competing rationalities and deep inequalities. Students will also research an organization of which they are a member and develop their own case study.

Crosslisted as: SOCI-316NQ
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
E. Townsley
Prereq: SOCI-123.

EOS-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

FMT-102 Introduction to Film Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course teaches the basic concepts, vocabulary, and critical skills involved in interpreting film. Through readings and lectures, students will become more informed and sophisticated observers of the cinema, key examples of which will be screened weekly. While the focus will be on the form and style of narrative film, documentary and avant-garde practices will be introduced. The class will also touch upon some of the major theoretical approaches in the field.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Restrictions: This course is limited to first-years and sophomores.

FMT-103 Talking Pictures: An Introduction to Film

Spring. Credits: 4

Some of the best feature-length films of the past century have commanded our attention and imagination because of their compelling artistry and the imaginative ways they tell stories visually and verbally. This course closely studies narrative films from around the world, from the silent era to the present, and in the process it introduces students to the basic elements of film form, style, and narration. Some of the films to be considered are: Battleship Potemkin, Citizen Kane, Contempt, The Bicycle Thief, Ugetsu, Rear Window, Woman in the Dunes, The Marriage of Maria Braun, Days of Heaven, and Moulin Rouge!.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-104
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
P. Staiti

FMT-104 Introduction to Media Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the critical study of media, focusing on electronic media, digital technologies, and network cultures. We will analyze the aesthetics, politics, protocols, history, and theory of media, paying attention to the ways they create and erase borders; affect how we form and articulate identities; invade privacy while providing a platform for exploration; foster hate speech and progressive movements alike; and participate in capitalist economies and the acceleration of climate change. While tracing the global flows of media creation, distribution, and consumption, we will also consider the different issues that arise in diverse national and local contexts.

Crosslisted as: CST-104
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
B. Ballina, H. Goodwin

FMT-106 Introduction to Theater

Fall. Credits: 4

This course offers the student a study and practice of theater as a collaborative art. Course includes the analysis of the dramatic text in terms of the actor; the director; the scenic, costume, lighting, and sound designers; and technicians. Close analytical readings of play texts and critical/theoretical essays will be supplemented by attending theater productions both on and off campus and by staging students' own theatrical projects.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder

FMT-131 Costume Construction

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course take students through the theatrical process of creating clothing and accessories for the stage. Topics covered are hand sewing techniques, fabric identification and use, and clothing alterations . The course will explore basic pattern drafting and draping, and some accessory construction. Students will work from costume renderings to build and alter clothing for Rooke Theater productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Bergeron
Notes: lab; materials fee $50

FMT-132 Lighting Design I

Fall. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and practice of lighting design for the theatre. This course will cover the basics of light, lighting equipment and how to develop a design for a theatrical production. Students will have the opportunity to use the Black Box Light Lab to create their own lighting designs from selected scenes of plays and musicals and learn the basics of programming a computerized lighting board. Students enrolled in this class will automatically be signed up for the Theatre Arts Department Light Prep Crew for the semester, where students learn to hang and focus lights on the Rooke Stage for the department's mainstage productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Z. Ash-Bristol

FMT-133 Introduction to Lighting and Sound Design

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and practice of lighting and sound design for the theater. This course will cover the basic tools and techniques of designing light and sound and provide an understanding of the designer's role in the collaborative process of producing a show. Students will have the opportunity to create their own lighting and sound designs in the Black Box classroom and present them to the class. In addition to class time students are required to complete 24 hours of light prep crew -- this is an extension of the class where students will learn how to hang and focus lights, read a light plot, and work as a lighting team on the Theater Department main stage productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Dubin
Notes: lab

FMT-137 Introduction to Technical Theatre

Fall. Credits: 4

This course will examine the materials and techniques used in building and operating theatrical scenery. It will include prop building, rigging, and welding for the theater. Students will learn the skills to work in the scene shop interpreting scenic designs for department productions.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Z. Ash-Bristol
Notes: lab; $50 materials fee. Theater tickets and any design supplies are the responsibility of the student

FMT-230 Intermediate Courses in History and Theory

FMT-230AG Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'American Gothic'

Fall. Credits: 4

An examination of the gothic - a world of fear, haunting, claustrophobia, paranoia, and monstrosity - in U.S. literature and visual culture. Topics include slavery and the gothic; gender, sexuality, and the gothic; regional gothic; the uncanny; cinematic and pictorial gothic; pandemic gothic. Authors, artists, and filmmakers may include Dunbar, Elmer, Faulkner, Gilman, Hitchcock, Jackson, Kubrick, LaValle, Lovecraft, McCullers, Morrison, O'Connor, Parks, Peele, Poe, Polanski, Romero, and Wood.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-243
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: English 240 or 241 recommended

FMT-230BC Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Bollywood: A Cinema of Interruptions'

Spring. Credits: 4

Indian popular cinema, known commonly as Bollywood, is usually understood to have weak storylines, interrupted by overblown spectacles and distracting dance numbers. The course explores the narrative structure of Bollywood as what scholar Lalitha Gopalan calls a "constellation of interruptions". We will learn to see Bollywood historically, as a cultural form that brings India's visual and performative traditions into a unique cinematic configuration. We will analyze a selection of feature films, read scholarly articles, participate in debates, write guided assignments, and pursue independent research papers in order to understand Bollywood's uniqueness in relation to world cinema.

Crosslisted as: ARTH-290BC
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

FMT-230CC Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Cinema and the City'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course offers an historical survey of film theory, from the work of its earliest authors and practitioners at the birth of the 20th century (who first struggled to define the medium), to those who are working still to elucidate the place of the cinema in relation to new media in its ever-evolving and ever more complex place in culture. As a way of focusing the discussion of the various theoretical positions, we will watch and discuss films that represent that most modern of phenomena--the city.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: One of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FMT-230CN Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Latin American Cinema'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers a broad introduction to the history, politics and aesthetics of Latin American cinema through some of its most influential films. We address the revolutionary styles of agit-prop, Neo-Realism and Third Cinema, as well as Hollywood-style melodrama. The course also familiarizes students with the basic terminology, concepts and approaches of film studies.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-240CN
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: SPAN-212 or native fluency in Spanish.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

FMT-230CW Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-215, GNDST-204CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English

FMT-230EF Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Ethnographic Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

Anthropologists have made films since the origins of the discipline and have long debated the role of film in the production of knowledge about others. This course explores the history, evolution, critiques, and contemporary practices of ethnographic film. We will consider key works that have defined the genre, and the innovations (and controversies) associated with them; we will engage documentary, observational, reflexive, and experimental cinema; and we will consider Indigenous media as both social activism and cultural reproduction. We will learn about film as a signifying practice, and grapple with the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation.

Crosslisted as: ANTHR-216EF
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Thorner
Prereq: ANTHR-105, or FLMST-201 or FLMST-202, or FMT-102 or FMT-103.

FMT-230FA Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Fascism in Plain Sight'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course examines fascism from a visual perspective. Students learn about the history of the phenomenon through the lenses of cinema, television, and performance. The course begins with an overview of fascism that spans from 1920s Europe to the present. What exactly is fascism? What is its relationship to newly emergent populisms (often called "fascist") and their own emphasis on spectacle? How does fascism visualize race, immigration, gender, sexuality, and violence? The course focuses mainly on fascism's manifestations throughout the Spanish-speaking world. That is, what do Latin America and Spain teach us about its malleability and adaptability?

Crosslisted as: SPAN-240FA, CST-249FA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: SPAN-212 or fluency in Spanish with permission.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

FMT-230HP Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Histories of Performance I'

Fall. Credits: 4

A survey of world performance history, including: the evolution of human language and consciousness; the rise of oral, ritual, and shamanic performance; religious and civic festivals; and imperial theater practices that position the stage at the dangerous intersection of religious worship, public taste, royal patronage, and government censure. Understanding performance as both artistic practice and social institution, this course emphasizes the role performance has played in changing audiences and as a cultural and political force in various societies. We explore not only how performances were created--in terms of design, dramaturgy, architecture, and acting--but also for whom, and why.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Holder

FMT-230HR Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Histories of Performance II'

Spring. Credits: 4

A historical survey of dramatic texts and world performance traditions from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, with attention given to: the influence of print culture on early modern theatrical movements; the rise of nationalism and the creation of dramatic genres; and the effects of industry and technology on experimental modernist forms. Understanding performance as both artistic practice and social institution, this course emphasizes the role performance has played in changing audiences and as a cultural and political force. As such, we explore not only how performances are created--in terms of design, dramaturgy, architecture, and acting--but for whom, and why.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Holder

FMT-230LX Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Latinx Media'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the recent history of Latinx media production and representation in the United States, linking the varying meanings of Latinidad to critical shifts in US and Latin American media landscapes. The course highlights vital exchanges across national and linguistic markets which inform the production of media by and about Latinxs.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
B. Ballina

FMT-230MC Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'The Musical Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores the American Musical Film from its first appearance in the late 1920s in early experiments with sound, through the films of Busby Berkeley and the MCM Musicals to its more recent revival in films such as Baz Luhrmann's 'Moulin Rouge.' The course also examines musical films from other national cinemas that either comment self-reflexively on the genre and its American context and/or expand common definitions of the genre.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: FMT-102 (or FMT-103), or FLMST-201 (or FLMST-202).

FMT-230MU Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Music and Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is for all who stay to the end of the credits, purchase soundtracks, and argue over who should have won the Oscar for Best Score, along with anyone else interested in the undervalued importance of music to the general effect of a motion picture. We will explore and discuss the myriad ways in which these two media interact. The course will focus on classic scores by Herrmann, Morricone, and Williams, as well as the uses of pre-existing music in films of Kubrick and Tarantino.

Crosslisted as: MUSIC-220
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Sanford
Prereq: MUSIC-100, MUSIC-102, MUSIC-103 or MUSIC-131, or one Film Studies course.

FMT-230NC Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Social Media: Networked Cultures'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Social media connect communities, inform us about friends' lives, and give us a platform on which to share ideas and form identities. Beyond that, social media play an increasingly conspicuous role in national and transnational politics, from Arab Spring to the viral spread of fake news around the 2016 US election. While social media connect people across the globe to an unprecedented degree, this course will explore how they also reveal divisions and borders, as well as alarming transgressions of borders, that complicate any utopian visions of a "global village." Throughout, we will be attuned to how corporate and governmental interests shape and are shaped by social media communities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
H. Goodwin

FMT-230RA Intermediate Courses in History and Theory:'Reel America: History and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the social and cultural history of the American film industry since the 1890s. The course surveys the evolution of Hollywood cinema from the silent era through the so-called classical period and through the post-World War II breakup of the studio system.

Crosslisted as: HIST-283RA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
D. Czitrom
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

FMT-230SK Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Shakespeare'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A study of some of Shakespeare's plays emphasizing the poetic and dramatic aspects of his art, with attention to the historical context and close, careful reading of the language. Eight or nine plays.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-211
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

FMT-230TW Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Twentieth-Century Fashion'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course is on the development of fashion and wearable art from the end of the nineteenth century to the year 2000. The course provides an overview of styles and a closerlook at the work of individual artists including Charles Frederick Worth, Paul Poiret, Mario Fortuny, Elsa Schiaparelli, Coco Chanel, Cristobal Balenciaga, Emilio Pucci, Mary Quant, Rudi Gurenreich, Alix Gres, Yves Saint Laurent, Christian LaCroix, Issey Miyake, Hussein Chalayan, Jean-Paul Gaultier, Anna Sui, and Vivienne Westwood, most of whom have also designed iconic costumes for theater or film. Lectures will be accompanied by PowerPoint presentation and where possible original examples of clothing will be shown.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James

FMT-230WC Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'History of World Cinema Through 1960'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers an historical survey of the cinema as a developing art form and a means of communication. We will examine the history of this international medium from its 19th-century beginnings through the mid-20th century. The national and thematic focus of the course shifts through the semester. For example, we will focus on U.S. film in studying the earliest developments in film technology and narrative, and on Soviet and French films to study the formal and social experimentation of the 1920s. The course provides a background for understanding film history and pursuing further studies in the field.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz

FMT-230WF Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'Global Film and Media After 1960'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines films and topics central to the study of global cinema since 1960. We will begin with the New Waves of France, Italy, England, and Japan, and Direct Cinema of the '60s and '70s in the U.S. We will explore films of Third Cinema in Latin America, Asia and Africa in the late '60s and '70s, and examine films of New Zealand and Australia from the '70s to the current moment, with an emphasis on stories that center indigenous peoples. We also will focus on significant film movements of the last three decades, such as New Queer Cinema in the U.S. and New Cinema of East and Southeast Asia. Analysis will focus on formal and stylistic techniques within a political and social context.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
B. Ballina
Prereq: One of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.
Notes: There are film screenings for this course.

FMT-230WM Intermediate Courses in History and Theory: 'History of World Media'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course looks at the history of global broadcast media from 1945 to 2010. We will focus on radio and television, with consideration of the role digital technologies have played in increasing global connectivity and the convergence of previously separate media formats. Students will learn how global media infrastructures came into existence over the airwaves, via undersea cables and via satellite networks. We will study the circulation of television shows and formats across national boundaries. We will also trace and analyze evolving representations of race, gender, and sexuality on television and in the creative responses of audiences and fan communities.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Goodwin

FMT-240 Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice

FMT-240AC Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Acting I'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course will focus on basic Stanislavski techniques: concentration, imagination, relaxation, objective/action, and beats/scene analysis. Each student will apply these concepts to one open scene, one monologue and one realistic contemporary scene.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
M. Ofori, N. Tuleja

FMT-240AT Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Acting II'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

A continuation of techniques developed in Acting I. Concentration is on scene work with 'classic' and contemporary realist playwrights, i.e., Chekhov, Ibsen, Williams, Churchill, Kane, etc. Students will perform at least four scenes using the Stanislavski method as their base. Practical tools explored in class are intended to offer the student greater vocal, physical, and imaginative freedom and clarity, as well as text analysis skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja, The department
Prereq: FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105).

FMT-240AX Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Acting for Film and Media'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course builds on the techniques and skills covered in Acting I and Acting II and applies them to acting for the camera. Through a series of classroom exercises and scene study, students will focus on expanding their range of emotional, intellectual, physical, and vocal expressiveness for the camera. Students will learn camera acting techniques by being in front of the camera as much as possible, as well as serving as "crew" for their classmates' scenes. The class will include extensive scene memorization, class discussions, and written and discussion-based performance critique.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105).

FMT-240CD Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Costume Design'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

An introduction to the art and work of the costume designer in the performing arts. Students will learn how a costume designer analyzes a script, approaches research, renders costume sketches, and helps to shape a production.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
A. Walker
Notes: Lab; $50 materials fee. Any additional design supplies and materials are the responsibility of the student.

FMT-240CM Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Stage Combat'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to help the actor discover a full awareness of their body so it can be used as an effective tool in creating and performing stage combat. Through a series of classroom exercises and performances this course will focus on giving students a strong foundation in stage combat techniques, including basic martial training, unarmed combat, quarterstaff, and sword and dagger/shield work. Students must be comfortable analyzing scenes of violence from contemporary film and stage and be prepared to work in a highly physical setting.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105).

FMT-240DF Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Costume Design for Stage and Film'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to the history, art, and techniques of designing costumes for stage and narrative film. Students will learn how a designer approaches a script, how the designer's work supports the actors' and the director's vision and how it illuminates a production for the audience. Students will have the opportunity to develop their visual imaginations through the creation of designs for stage and film scripts. They will engage in play analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, drawing, rendering, and other related techniques and methodologies.

Crosslisted as: ARTST-226DF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Advisory: Some drawing and painting skills along with an interest in costume history are recommended but not required.

FMT-240DR Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Directing'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course is designed to be an introduction to the fundamental theories and principles of directing for the stage. Visual theory, text analysis, collaborative techniques, and organizational strategies are examined and applied in class exercises, including the direction of a major scene. Each student will be required to cast, rehearse, and present to the public a fully realized scene by the end of term. Directing is a complicated activity that requires you to do and be many things, and this course will help you lay the foundation to discovering your own process.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: FMT-106 (or THEAT-100) or FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105).

FMT-240MP Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Movement for Performance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to a range of physical techniques for creative expression in performance. Through a series of classroom exercises, readings and performances, students develop a process for reducing habitual tensions, enabling them to find maximum effect with minimum effort, connect their movement to imagery and text and increase the strength, flexibility and dynamic qualities of their physical expression. Techniques are drawn from a wide variety of movement pedagogies including, but not limited to, Zarrilli, Feldenkrais, Oida and Pisk. This course will require outside rehearsals for class performances as well as one research project on a major movement practitioner.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105).

FMT-240PE Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'African Performance Aesthetics'

Fall. Credits: 4

This class explores African approaches to performance, premised on the interdisciplinarity of theater in many African societies. We take our inspiration from centuries of apprentice-style artist training in some indigenous West African societies. The evolution of oral and popular performance traditions into literary theater has also necessitated a similar trend in the training of the modern actor. The primary object of this class is to be able to embody a plethora of idiomatic expressions. Thus, we will move to the energy of the drums, we will train the ears to transmit the complex musicality of several sonic elements and raise our voices in song and apply them in scene explorations. Ultimately, we intend to unlock new ways of using our minds, bodies, and voices as conduits of exciting storytelling.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-241PE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Ofori

FMT-240PW Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Playwriting'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course offers practice in the fundamentals of dramatic structure and technique. Weekly reading assignments will examine the unique nature of writing for the theater, nuts and bolts of format, tools of the craft, and the playwright's process from formulating a dramatic idea to rewriting. Weekly writing assignments will include scene work, adaptation, and journaling. The course will culminate in a significant writing project. Each class meeting will incorporate reading student work aloud with feedback from the instructor and the class. Students will listen, critique, and develop the vocabulary to discuss plays, structure, story, and content.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-205
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. Horwitz
Prereq: One course in Film, Media, Theater, or Theater Arts, or a creative writing English course.
Notes: Cannot be taken at the 300 level.

FMT-240SD Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Scene Design for Theater and Film'

Fall. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce the history, art, and techniques of designing sets for theater and film. Students will learn how sets have been created in the past, how a designer approaches a script, how a designer's work supports the director's vision, how it illuminates a production for the audience, and what methods and techniques are used in the execution of the process. Students will have the opportunity to exercise their visual imaginations, through the creation of designs for a script. They will engage in script analysis, research, collaborative discussion, sketching, technical drawing, model building, and related techniques and methodologies.

Crosslisted as: ARCH-203
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
V. James
Notes: Lab; $50 materials fee. Any additional design supplies and materials are the responsibility of the student.

FMT-240SG Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Stage Management'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of what a stage manager does and why a stage manager is integral to any theatrical production. Students will understand the technical and artistic skills required of a stage manager, and will examine a dramatic text from a stage manager's perspective. Through group activities and in-class projects, students will use the text to execute stage management duties during the pre-production, rehearsal, and performance process. This will include creating paperwork, taping out a ground plan, notating blocking, prompting, running a tech rehearsal, creating a prompt book, and calling cues.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Z. Ash-Bristol
Prereq: FMT-106 (or THEAT-100).
Notes: Theater tickets, supplies, and materials are the responsibility of the student.

FMT-240VP Intermediate Courses in Production and Practice: 'Introduction to Video Production'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course provides a foundation in the principles, techniques, and equipment involved in video production. Students will make several short videos over the course of the term as well as one final piece. We will develop our own voices while learning the vocabulary of moving images and gaining production and post-production skills. In addition to technical training, classes will include critiques, screenings, readings, and discussion.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Montague
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: FMT-102 (or FLMST-201).
Advisory: Application and permission of instructor required. Application found here: Application
Notes: A lab fee may be charged

FMT-282 Theater Practicum

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

Fall 2020 Productions:
FMT-282-02: Much Ado About Nothing
Spring 2021 Productions:
FMT-282-01: The Language of Angels
FMT-282-02: Machinal
This course is open to any student cast in a mainstage production or serving as a stage manager, assistant stage manager, or assistant director. The student is expected to attend all rehearsals and performances under the supervision of the director. Rehearsals include table reads, blocking and staging, scene work, run-throughs, dress rehearsals, technical rehearsals, invited dress, which culminates in performances for the public. Outside work includes line memorization, character work, and scene preparation. Total contact hours range anywhere from 75-125 over the course of the production.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Ofori, N. Tuleja
Instructor permission required.
Advisory: by audition or interview only
Notes: Repeatable for credit. Meets Humanities requirement if taken for 4 credits.

FMT-284 Theater Practicum: Costumes

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

The practicum covers crew for hair and makeup or wardrobe on a production. The student fulfilling a run crew must be present for all technical rehearsals and performances plus a training session scheduled before the start of tech. No previous experience is necessary for any of these positions; training will be provided as part of the practicum.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Bergeron
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Repeatable. Contact Costume Shop Manager for specific dates and times.

FMT-286 Theater Practicum: Lighting and Sound

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course is for students interested in the production crew positions listed below. No previous experience is necessary for any of these positions; training will be provided as part of the practicum. The student will need to be present for all technical rehearsals and performances and a training session scheduled before the start of tech. Light Board Operator: Program and run the light control board under the guidance of the Lighting Designer and Stage Manager. Sound Board Operator: Program and run the sound board and sound computer under the guidance of the Sound Designer and Stage Manager. Follow Spot Operator: Operate a follow spot under the guidance of the Lighting Designer and Stage Manager. Must be comfortable with heights. Projection Operator: Program and run the projection equipment and computer under the guidance of the Projection Designer and Stage Manager.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Z. Ash-Bristol
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Repeatable. Contact Lara Dubin (Lighting & Sound Supervisor) for the specific dates and times.

FMT-288 Theater Practicum: Scenic Run Crew

Spring. Credits: 1

This course is for students interested in working on Scenic Run Crew. No previous experience is required for this position; training will be provided as part of the practicum. Students will need to be present at all technical rehearsals and performances and will need to help with the strike of the set for the final performances.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Z. Ash-Bristol
Instructor permission required.
Notes: Repeatable. Contact Shawn Hill (Technical Director) for specific dates and times.

FMT-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

FMT-330 Advanced Courses in History and Theory

FMT-330AD Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Adaptation: A Study in Form'

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

The Oxford English Dictionary defines "adaptation" as "the bringing of two things together so as to effect a change in the nature of the objects." Rather than studying adaptation as a project that attempts to reproduce an original work in another medium, our course considers the complex relationship between narratives and their retellings and revisions. In particular, we will focus on how such retellings permanently alter their so-called "source" material and how each incarnation of a given narrative offers us insight into and commentary upon a particular historical moment and its unique political and ideological challenges. We will also consider the ways in which literary and visual representations differ in their communicative and affective mechanisms, and challenge where we draw the line between "art," "history," and "entertainment.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-367AD
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in English or in Film, Media, Theater.

FMT-330AT Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'African Theater'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course introduces the oral traditions, important playwrights, and aesthetic innovations in postcolonial literary theater in some African societies. The oral theater traditions of Africa are an example of the innate human quest to perform and will eventually be the basis for understanding some of the innovations made in African literary theater. We shall also focus on writings by African writers and writers of African descent who deal with the post-colonial conditions of Black Africa and the African Diaspora. This class is designed to serve as a window into the continent of Africa: its people, its ideas, triumphs, struggles, and the complex histories emerging from its vastness and diversity.

Crosslisted as: AFCNA-341AT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
M. Ofori
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in Film, Media, Theater, or Theater Arts, or Africana Studies.

FMT-330AV Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Artists vs. Audiences'

Fall. Credits: 4

Usually, an artist produces a work, and then an audience experiences that work. However, sometimes audiences influence what a work means and even how an ongoing story unfolds. This course focuses on works of popular, serialized art in which the possibilities for artist/audience interaction are great, and so is the potential for conflict. We look at serial novels, film series, television shows, and new media (such as TikTok), among others. What are the rights of artists to control their works? What rights do audiences have to alter or create new works based on an existing work? What should we do when these rights conflict? What makes a "bad fan" bad? When do audiences become artists?

Crosslisted as: PHIL-375AV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
J. Harold
Prereq: 8 credits in Philosophy or 4 credits in Philosophy and 4 credits in Film, Media, Theater.

FMT-330CM Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Contemporary Masculinities on Stage and Screen'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course explores postmodern American masculinity as it is constructed and disseminated through contemporary film and theater. Students will study contemporary theories of masculinity as well as portrayals of masculinity, in its various forms, for both stage and screen. In addition, we will explore what is at stake (culturally, ideologically, and economically) in perpetuating certain masculine archetypes, and what "new" representations have arisen in the past few decades. Finally, we will consider the ways in which film and theater imagines masculinity to intersect with race, gender, and class, and the limitations of that representational archive.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-367CM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Rodgers
Prereq: FMT-102 (or FLMST-201) or FMT-106 (or THEAT-100).

FMT-330EA Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Envisioning Apocalypse'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With ever more dire news about our planetary future hitting the headlines regularly, what better time to look at how human beings past and present have envisioned the demise of the earth or our species? In this course we will study representations of apocalyptic futures from illuminated manuscripts, from illustrated poetry, and from science fiction films that waver between hope for escape and doomsday scenarios. Along the way we will also take seriously nonfiction representations of global crisis, analyzing how phenomena like climate change and galactic collision are represented across media forms, including infographics, visual models, digital memes, and documentary films.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Goodwin
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: FMT-102 (or FLMST-201) or FMT-104 (or FLMST-220MD).

FMT-330EX Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Women Experimental Filmmakers'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar examines experimental cinema made by women from the early 1950s, during the earliest years of the movement known as the American Avant-Garde, through the 1990s. While the class will read feminist film theory and see the work of such well-known filmmakers as Yvonne Rainer, Sally Potter, and Chantal Akerman, we will also examine the less familiar but highly influential films of women working in the home movie or diary mode, with particular emphasis on the work of Marie Menken.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333VV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: One of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FMT-330GH Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Ghosts, Specters, and Hauntings: Mediating the Dead'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course considers the connections between media as channels for communication and expression, on the one hand, and mediums as those who claim to have contact with the dead, on the other. Students will study the ways communication and performance media, from Shakespearian theater, to films and photographs of deceased loved ones, to legacy accounts on Facebook, have served as conduits of the dead and even spawned occult practices. The course will address: how do theater, film, and other media bridge us to what has been lost and animate our connections to those who have died? How do ghostly media ask us to confront a past that has been buried?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Goodwin
Prereq: 8 credits in Film, Media, Theater including Intro to Film or Intro to Media.

FMT-330HA Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Hitchcock and After'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course will examine the films of Alfred Hitchcock and the afterlife of Hitchcock in contemporary U.S. culture. We will interpret Hitchcock films in a variety of theoretical frames, including feminist and queer theories, and in shifting historical contexts, including the Cold War. We will also devote substantial attention to the legacy of Hitchcock in remakes, imitations, and parodies. Hitchcock films may include Spellbound, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, and The Birds; additional works by Brooks, Craven, and De Palma. Readings in film and cultural theory; screenings at least weekly.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-374
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Young
Prereq: 4 credits in Film, Media, Theater and 4 credits in English.
Notes: meets English Department seminar requirement

FMT-330PA Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Natural's Not in It: Pedro Almodóvar'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course studies the films of Pedro Almodóvar, European cinema's favorite bad boy turned acclaimed auteur. On the one hand, students learn to situate films within the context of contemporary Spanish history (the transition to democracy, the advent of globalization, etc.) in order to consider the local contours of postmodern aesthetics. On the other hand, the films provide a springboard to reflect on larger theoretical and ethical debates related to gender, sexuality, consumer culture, authenticity, and authorship.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-340PA, GNDST-333PA, CST-349PA
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
J. Crumbaugh
Prereq: 8 credits in Spanish, Film Studies, Critical Social Thought, and/or Gender Studies.
Notes: Weekly evening screenings. Taught in English.

FMT-330RC Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Reflexivity in the Cinema'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Some of the most compelling films in the history of the moving image have been those that make the viewer aware of the processes of their own production. Breaking away from the tradition of what Robert Stam calls the "art of enchantment," they call attention to themselves for reasons that range from the playful to the philosophical to the political. Some of the directors whom we will consider include: Chantal Akerman, Wes Anderson, Julie Dash, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Federico Fellini, Jean-Luc Godard, William Greaves, Buster Keaton, Spike Lee, David Lynch, Fanta Régina Nacro, and Preston Sturges.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Blaetz
Prereq: 8 credits in Film, Media, Theater (or Film Studies) including one of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FMT-330SE Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'A Rebel with a Camera: the Cinema of Ousmane Sembene'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Born in 1923 in Senegal, the writer/filmmaker Ousmane Sembène is one of the rare witnesses of the three key periods of contemporary African history: the colonial period; the period of struggle for political and economic independence; and the period of effort to eliminate neocolonialism through the rehabilitation of African cultures. This course is entirely devoted to the works of Ousmane Sembène and will explore the key moments of his life, his activism in European leftist organizations, his discovery of writing, and most of all the dominant features of his film work.

Crosslisted as: FREN-341SE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FMT-330SF Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Shakespeare and Film'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will read plays by Shakespeare, watch films based on those plays, and study the plays, the films, and the plays-as-films. "Shakespeare" comes first, of course, both historically and as the source/inspiration for the films. Yet each film has its own existence, to be understood not just as an "adaptation," but also as the product of linked artistic, technical, and economic choices. Considering Shakespeare's plays as pre-texts (rather than pre-scriptions), we will look at early and recent films, both those that follow closely conventionalized conceptualizations of "Shakespeare," and those that tend to erase or emend their Shakespearean sources.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-312SF
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Holder
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits from English beyond the 100 level, including ENGL-211.

FMT-330ST Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'The Italian Stage Between Social Mobility, Politics, and Tradition'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores Italian theater from the 1700s to today with particular attention to social mobility, women's rights, politics, and class conflict. Authors include classics such as Goldoni, Pirandello, DarioFo, Franca Rame, Dacia Maraini, Eduardo De Filippo, and more.

Crosslisted as: ITAL-341ST
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
O. Frau
Prereq: Two courses in Italian, Classics, English, Theater, or Music.
Notes: This course is taught in English. Students who desire to take it for Italian credit will meet separately with the Professor Frau for designated sessions, in Italian.

FMT-330SV Advanced Courses in History and Theory: 'Media and Surveillance'

Fall. Credits: 4

With corporations using our data to anticipate our desires and counterterrorism units tapping into our communications, we are increasingly embedded in a surveillance society. This course considers practices of surveillance across media platforms, from smartphones, fitness trackers, and baby monitors to the biometric technologies that determine who may cross borders. We will explore how different governments, corporations, and individuals use new media to surveil others, as well as the ways racism and transphobia are inscribed in surveillance practices. We will also discuss and try out protective measures and various subversive practices of "sousveillance.

Crosslisted as: CST-349SV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
H. Goodwin
Prereq: One of the following: FMT-102, FMT-103, FMT-230CN, FLMST-201, FLMST-202, or FLMST-203.

FMT-340 Advanced Courses in Production and Practice:

FMT-340AU Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Audition Techniques'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for the challenges that accompany auditioning for film and theater. During the semester students will be asked to work on a series of monologues (4-6) that range from classical to contemporary in style. Time will also be spent on cold readings, taped auditions, resume and headshot workshops, and singing auditions. This is an advanced level course and is intended for students interested in pursuing audition both at Mount Holyoke College and outside of academic institutions. The pace will be brisk and students will be required to perform or present material every week.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: FMT-240AC (or THEAT-105) and one of the following: FMT-240AT, FMT-240CM, FMT-240MP, FMT-340AY, THEAT-205, THEAT-215CM, THEAT-215MP, or THEAT-305.

FMT-340AY Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Acting III: Styles'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This performance-intensive course will focus on specific styles, ranging from the Greek, to Shakespeare, to non-realism. Through a series of classroom explorations, students will learn how to craft a believable character, using the gesture, vocal, and physical language of certain styles including but not limited to: chorus work, soliloquies, and scenes.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
N. Tuleja

FMT-340CR Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Creative Incubator'

Spring. Credits: 4

The Creative Incubator is a transdisciplinary laboratory of creative explorations. The fundamental objective of this class is to democratize the creative process. As such we shall collectively engage with a wide variety of art forms and artistic processes that will hopefully serve as inspiration for our own creative agency. The class also adopts a highly collaborative approach which deemphasizes the idea of the "disciplinary expert." As a theme-driven and project-based lab, each semester we shall nurture ideas from their inception until they culminate into events. Each project will be approached with a desire for inquiry and risk taking, and a desire to attain the ultimate collective goal.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Community-Based Learning
M. Ofori
Prereq: 8 credits in Film, Media, Theater.

FMT-340SP Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Advanced Performance Studio'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed for students with a strong grasp of acting, directing, design, film production, and anything in between. This course will focus on creating one major performance, using the talents and interests of all members of the class. The platform for performance will depend on whether we are on campus, remote, or a combination of the two. This will be a fast-paced course meant for students serious about theater, media and film, and who are passionate about working in a collaborative environment to create a unified whole.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: At least 8 credits above the 100 level in Film, Media, Theater performance or production.

FMT-340SW Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Screenwriting'

Fall. Credits: 4

The screenplay is a unique and ephemeral form that exists as a blueprint for something else: a finished film. How do you convey on the page a story that will take shape within an audio-visual medium? The screenwriter must have an understanding of both the language of narrative film as well as the general shape and mechanics of film stories. This advanced course will cover dialogue, characterization, plot, story arc, genre, and cinematic structure. We will analyze scenes from fictional narrative films -- both short and feature length -- and read the scripts that accompany these films. By the end of this course, each student will have written two original short films. In workshop style, the class will serve as practice audience for table readings of drafts and writing exercises.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-361SW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Montague
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: 8 credits in Film Studies.
Advisory: Preference will be given to majors. Application and permission of instructor required.

FMT-340VN Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'En Garde, A Study of Stage and Screen Violence'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

All Drama is Conflict. This course investigates how dramatic conflict is represented in theater, television and film and examines its effect on the audience. Through a series of readings, class discussions, and viewings including, but not limited to, Romeo & Juliet, The Duelists, and Fight Club, students will attempt to answer the question: what is it about human nature that makes us fascinated by violence as a form of entertainment?

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
N. Tuleja
Prereq: 8 credits in Film, Media, Theater (or Theater Arts).

FMT-340VP Advanced Courses in Production and Practice: 'Advanced Projects in Video Production: Short-Form Narrative'

Spring. Credits: 4

Intended for advanced Film, Media, Theater students, this course will explore fictional narrative filmmaking through a rigorous script-to-screen process. Students will write, shoot and edit a short (8-minute) fictional narrative film in small groups. In addition to weekly online screenings of short and feature narrative films, the class will consist of multi-weekly Zoom synchronous sessions led by the professor, including lectures on advanced narrative filmmaking techniques, film discussions, script readings and critiques of footage and various cuts.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
E. Montague
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: FMT-240VP or FLMST-210VP.
Advisory: Application and permission of instructor required. Application available through department website.
Notes: Class will be taught virtually. Students living off-campus within the United States (including any Five College students) will be mailed equipment.

FMT-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

FREN-101 Elementary French I

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Learn to speak, understand, read and write authentic French in record time. We will use a multimedia approach that accesses language via video, audio and text. The immersive environment students experience will equip them to make active use of the language and provide insight into French and Francophone cultures.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Alquier, N. Holden-Avard
Prereq: Placement test required even if no previous study of French; score 0-100.
Advisory: FREN-101 is designed for students with no previous training in French or a maximum of one year of French at the high school level. All students must take the online French placement test to register for the class.
Notes: Students who have done strong work in FREN-101 may accelerate to FREN-201 with the approval of their instructor.

FREN-102 Elementary French II

Spring. Credits: 4

Students will develop their speaking, understanding, reading and writing skills in French. The multimedia approach will provide students with an immersive environment where they will engage actively with the language and culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Alquier, N. Holden-Avard
Prereq: FREN-101 or placement test.
Notes: Students may select whichever lab fits their schedules, as class content will be the same across sections.

FREN-201 Intermediate French

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Communication and culture in the global French-speaking world. We will explore different media and documents that will enable students to express themselves both orally and in writing in a wide variety of contexts. Students will consolidate and expand their skills and engage in creative activities in literary as well as colloquial French.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Alquier, C. Shread, The department
Prereq: FREN-102 or FREN-199, placement score of 200-350, or department placement.

FREN-203 Advanced Intermediate French

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course will improve students' writing and speaking skills in French and develop their ability to read and analyze texts. Course materials include authors and films representing cultures of the French-speaking world. Written and oral expression are strengthened through weekly essays, class discussion, and comprehensive grammar review.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Alquier, C. Le Gouis C. Shread
Prereq: FREN-201, placement score of 350-450, or department placement.
Notes: Note: FREN-203 provides a strong foundation for continued study of French and for study abroad (see http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/french)

FREN-215 Intermediate Level Courses in Culture and Literature: Introduction to the Literature and Culture of France and the French-Speaking World

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces students to literature and culture from a variety of perspectives. It will increase confidence and skill in writing and speaking; integrate historical, political, and social contexts into the study of literary texts from France and the French-speaking world; and bring understanding of the special relevance of earlier periods to contemporary French and Francophone cultural and aesthetic issues. Students explore diversified works - literature, historical documents, film, art, and music - and do formal oral and written presentations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Le Gouis, C. Shread, The department
Prereq: FREN-203, placement score of 450 or higher, or department placement.

FREN-219 Intermediate Level Courses in Culture and Literature: Introduction to the French-Speaking World

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course introduces the literatures of French-speaking countries outside Europe. Readings include tales, novels, plays, and poetry from Africa, the Caribbean, Canada, and other areas. Discussions and short papers examine the texts as literary works as well as keys to the understanding of varied cultures. Students will be asked to do formal oral and written presentations.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: FREN-203, placement score of 450 or higher, or department placement.

FREN-225 Intermediate Level Courses in Culture and Literature: Introduction to Contemporary Culture and Media of France and the French-Speaking World

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to contemporary popular culture in France and the French-speaking world, largely through the study of recent (post-1990) best-selling novels, popular music, and feature films. Students will be asked to give oral presentations based on current materials gathered from the Internet and/or French television and to participate actively in class discussion.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
A. Alquier
Prereq: FREN-203, placement score of 450 or higher, or department placement.

FREN-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

FREN-311 Period Courses

The usual periodization of French literature and culture is by century. Some period courses focus on the characteristics of specific centuries. Others focus on artistic or intellectual movements: gothic, Renaissance, romantic. All period courses, whatever their conceptual framework, integrate texts and historical contexts.

FREN-311DN Period Courses: 'The Detective Novel in France'

Spring. Credits: 4

The French detective novel found its origins in Poe and in the disillusionment and malaise of the increasingly urban universe of the nineteenth century. It generally centered on a dark, mysterious Parisian atmosphere that spoke to a growing public awareness of the worlds of crime and of the police. Realist novelists, in particular Dostoevsky, enriched the genre's conventions, but the detective novel evolved beyond realism as it moved into the twentieth century, combining unsettling social critique with reassuringly flawless reasoning.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Le Gouis
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, 219, 225, 230, or permission of department chair and course instructor.

FREN-321 Genre Courses

This interdisciplinary seminar will focus on a comparative study of Romance languages or literatures. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Seminar discussions will be conducted in English, but students wishing to obtain language credit are expected to read works in at least one original language. Papers will be written in either English or the Romance language of the student's choice.

FREN-321LT Genre Courses: 'Romance Languages Translate'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar explores Romance languages, literatures and cultures through the prism of translation. By comparing translations from Spanish, Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Romanian between each other and into English, we will map out the boundaries, intersections and middle grounds of this language family. Students will engage with the different traditions of translation studies in these languages and critically analyze translators' paratexts. Selecting an individual translation project in a Romance language of their choice, through a process of revision and collaboration, each student will produce both a polished translation and a commentary explaining challenges and choices.

Crosslisted as: ROMLG-375LT, ITAL-361LT, SPAN-360LT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Shread
Advisory: Two courses in culture and literature at the 200 level.
Notes: Students wishing to obtain 300-level credit in French, Italian, or Spanish must read texts and write papers in the Romance language for which they wish to receive credit.

FREN-321MT Genre Courses: 'The Mind of the Traveler: Journeys, Expeditions, Tours'

Spring. Credits: 4

Travel literature has always been a precious source for the study of culture, politics, arts and, last but not least, people. From Tacitus to Marco Polo, from Stendhal to Camilo Jose Cela, we will read and discuss authors who traveled for political, personal, and recreational reasons. We will also pay special attention to tales of emigration and immigration in the third millennium.

Crosslisted as: SPAN-360MT, ITAL-361MT, ROMLG-375MT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
O. Frau
Advisory: for language majors; two courses in culture and literature at the 200-level
Notes: Note: Students wishing to obtain 300-level credit in French, Italian, or Spanish must read texts and write papers in the Romance language for which they wish to receive credit.

FREN-331 Courses on Social and Political Issues and Critical Approaches

These courses examine a definable phenomenon--an idea, a movement, an event, a mentality, a cultural structure or system, an historical problem, a critical mode--relevant to the civilization of France or of French-speaking countries. Readings from a variety of disciplines shed light on the particular aspect of thought or culture being studied.

FREN-331LM Courses on Social and Political Issues and Critical Approaches: 'Reading "Le Monde"'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Founded after the liberation of Paris near the end of World War II at the behest of General de Gaulle, Le Monde is the premier French newspaper, famous for its in-depth analysis of domestic and international topics and for its provocative opinion pieces. In this course we will examine the history and evolution of the paper; we will then read each week a selection of pieces across a range of fields including domestic and international politics, society, economics, business and the arts. Through the reading and study of Le Monde, students gain a distinct French perspective on current affairs; advanced language skills in contemporary French, and up-to-theminute access to French culture.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
C. Le Gouis
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FREN-331MD Courses on Social and Political Issues and Critical Approaches: 'La Mode'

Fall. Credits: 4

Fashion is both a creative and a commercial enterprise. We will examine iconic French designs and designers, haute couture, the concept of brands, fashion media, and industry as a backdrop for understanding the aesthetic and socioeconomic dimensions of French fashion, and the way in which trends mirror contemporary values and culture. Issues discussed will include French cultural movements (the mechanics and dynamics of cycles, trends, and fads), the various market segments of the French fashion industry, the impact of globalization, as well as innovative French fashion and sustainability. The course may include events and talks.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
A. Alquier
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FREN-341 Courses in Francophone Studies

These courses study nonmetropolitan French-speaking cultures and literary works written in French outside Europe. Areas of focus are one or more of the following regions: Africa, the Caribbean, or Canada.

FREN-341FS Courses in Francophone Studies: 'Women and Writing in French-Speaking Africa'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores writings by women in French-speaking Africa from its early beginnings in the late 1970s to the present. Special attention will be given to social, political, gender, and aesthetic issues.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333FP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: 12 credits in French including two courses at the advanced level, or permission of department chair and instructor.

FREN-341HT Courses in Francophone Studies: 'The Haitian Literary Tradition: Revolution, Diaspora, and Writing in French Now'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course engages with the rich tradition of French writing from Haiti. Beginning with Emeric Bergeaud's Stella (1859), the first novel of the first Black republic, students will explore the history of Haitian writing across literary genres and movements, including the Indigénisme that anticipated Négritude. We will study this tradition both on the island and abroad. Diasporic authors from the period of the Duvalier dictatorship include Dany Laferrière, famous as both the first Haitian and the first Quebecois to enter the Académie française, and Marie Vieux-Chauvet. In Haiti's contemporary literary scene, we focus on women writers such as Yanick Lahens, Kettly Mars and Marie-Célie Agnant.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
C. Shread
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FREN-341NE Courses in Francophone Studies: 'Revisiting the Negritude Movement: Origins, Evolution, and Relevance'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In the interwar period, 1920-1940, black students from Africa and the Caribbean met in Paris to pursue their education. Galvanized by the colonial situation at home and the political situation in France, Aimé Césaire (Martinique), Léopold S. Senghor (Sénégal), and Léon Damas (French Guyana) formed the cultural movement called Négritude. This course will survey the emergence, goals, evolution, achievements, and legacies of that movement. Discussions will be based on major texts by the founders. Their influence on the works of a new generation of African and Caribbean writers will also be examined.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: 12 credits in French including two courses at the advanced level, or permission of department chair and instructor.

FREN-341PA Courses in Francophone Studies: 'Paris dans l'Imaginaire Africain'

Spring. Credits: 4

Colonial relations have not only been a contest over land ownership but were also always centered around the question of who has the right to represent whom. This course will examine how, from the fifties and sixties, African students in France have represented France and Paris in their narratives. Readings will include novels and travelogues.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225, or permission of department chair and course instructor.

FREN-341SE Courses in Francophone Studies: 'A Rebel with a Camera: the Cinema of Ousmane Sembene'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Born in 1923 in Senegal, the writer/filmmaker Ousmane Sembène is one of the rare witnesses of the three key periods of contemporary African history: the colonial period; the period of struggle for political and economic independence; and the period of effort to eliminate neocolonialism through the rehabilitation of African cultures. This course is entirely devoted to the works of Ousmane Sembène and will explore the key moments of his life, his activism in European leftist organizations, his discovery of writing, and most of all the dominant features of his film work.

Crosslisted as: FMT-330SE
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
S. Gadjigo
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FREN-351 Courses on Women and Gender

These courses explore cultural, literary, and social issues relating to women and gender identities in France and French-speaking countries. Topics may include women's writing, writing about women and men, the status of women, feminist criticism, and

FREN-351SE Courses on Women and Gender: 'Every Secret Thing'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will examine contemporary autobiographical narratives written by women, with a particular focus on authors whose works include multiple autobiographical texts of various genres: fictional, nonfictional, and semifictional. We will analyze the ways in which these authors present their life stories, especially its traumatic or secret episodes, and the ways in which their works discuss the process of that presentation and of memory itself. Themes that are common to these autobiographical texts include: relationships with family, education, sexuality, class, and love. In addition to literary texts, we will analyze in detail several autobiographical films made by women.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Rivers
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225.

FREN-351VR Courses on Women and Gender: 'Viragos, Virgins, and Visionaries'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, we will study the three most celebrated French female saints: Jeanne d'Arc, Thérèse de Lisieux and Bernadette de Lourdes. Their stories are similar: ordinary young women to whom extraordinary things happened, who became symbols of France and inspired a rich verbal and visual iconography. Yet they are profoundly different: Joan was a warrior, Thérèse a memoirist, Bernadette a visionary. We will study the facts of their lives, in their own words and those of others, but also the many fictions, semi-fictions, myths and legends based on those lives. We will analyze a number of films and visual images as well as literary and non-literary texts in our attempt to understand these cases of specifically female, specifically French sainthood.

Crosslisted as: GNDST-333VR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Rivers
Prereq: Two of the following courses: FREN-215, FREN-219, FREN-225

FREN-361TR Courses in Advanced Language Study: 'Atelier de Traduction'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed to give students practical, hands-on experience in the translation, from French to English, of a literary work. We will begin the semester with readings in translation theory before moving on to the selection (by students) of a literary text. Students will work collaboratively in teams on a collective translation; teams will meet on a weekly basis with the professor for a detailed review of the work in progress. At the end of the semester, each team will submit the definitive version of their translation as well as a paper reflecting on the particular linguistic challenges encountered and their resolution thereof.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
C. Rivers
Prereq: Two of French 215, 219, 225 and one 300-level course in the French department.

FREN-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

FYSEM-110 First-Year Seminar

FYSEM-110AM Art and Words

Fall. Credits: 4

True, a picture is worth a thousand words, but how do we know which words to use exactly? In this seminar, we will focus on the work of language in relation to the visual arts, and learn to distinguish between different kinds of writing, including art history, art criticism, poetry and fiction. We will visit the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum and the Skinner Museum, and develop provocative ideas about original works of art. We will practice critical thinking and writing on our own, and work collaboratively on various projects. We will find a deeper relationship between words and the arts by expanding our definition of writing to include speaking thoughtfully, listening actively, and cultivating leadership skills by striking idea-driven discussions on the arts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Sinha
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110AT The Art of Resistance

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the visual and sonic history of resistance movements in the United States from the American Revolution to Black Lives Matter. Through the close study of art objects and music, engagement with primary source material and group discussions, first-year students will develop adept visual and cultural literacies alongside more traditional written and verbal registers.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Sparling Williams
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110AV Women, Politics, and Activism in U.S. History

Fall. Credits: 4

From the founding of the United States to the present, how have women taken the lead to act on their visions of a just, righteous, or sustainable world? Where have they planted their feet on colonized ground and insisted on their own sovereignty, freedom, or citizenship? When have they agitated successfully for fundamental change, whether from homes, fields, and factory floors, or from the halls of power? This course addresses conflicting perspectives within women's politics, with attention to histories of racism, radicalism, feminism, and conservatism.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Renda
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110CM Coming of Age on Screen

Fall. Credits: 4

In this course we will trace the representation of teenage girls in television and film from the 1950s to the present as a way to better understand how moving images shape culture. We will look closely at the notion of "entertainment" and at the ways in which moving image texts create ways of seeing and meaning.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Blaetz
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110CP What's to Be Done About Capitalism?

Fall. Credits: 4

From the writings of Adam Smith in the 18th century to present-day arguments by Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the benefits and costs of capitalism in human society have been hotly debated. Do the benefits of capitalism outweigh the costs? Is it possible or desirable to "tame" markets to maintain their good elements while minimizing the harm? How has a debate dominated by Europeans and North Americans considered or overlooked perspectives from the rest of the world? In exploring these questions, we will engage with some of the key thinkers on capitalism from Adam Smith and Karl Marx through major thinkers in both the developed and developing world to the present day.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Mitchell
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110EQ Disaster Science: Earthquakes, Floods, and Volcanoes

Fall. Credits: 4

This course explores the sometimes catastrophic intersection of geology with people's lives. Earthquakes, volcanoes, and floods are geologic events; they are also natural hazards that pose significant challenges to communities in high risk areas. Where are these risky areas? Why? Is it possible to predict when and where catastrophic geologic events will occur? How do we assess geological risks? Using case studies from around the world, we explore these three natural hazards in the context of evolving geologic research on plate tectonics and climate change.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Markley
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110GF God, Free Will, and Morality

Fall. Credits: 4

This first year seminar is a critical thinking boot camp. Students will learn to charitably interpret, logically reconstruct, and critically evaluate arguments. The arguments come from classic and contemporary readings in philosophy about God, free will, and morality. We will focus on questions such as: Does God exist? Is it rational to believe in God? What should I do if I want to do the right thing? When is it ok to criticize other cultures? How much do I owe to others? Do we have free will? Can we ever be held responsible for anything? Students will come out of the class better thinkers, better writers, and better equipped to tackle difficult questions like these with rigor and care.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Vavova
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110GR Greek Tragedy, American Drama, and Film

Fall. Credits: 4

The Greeks, beginning with Homer, saw the world from an essentially tragic perspective. The searing question of why human societies and the human psyche repeatedly break down in tragic ruin and loss, particularly in the conflicts of war and in the betrayal of personal bonds of love and friendship, fascinated them as it still does us. The most consistent themes that emerged from such examination are the tragedy of self-knowledge and illusion, the tragedy of desire, the tragedy of crime and redemption, and tragedy as a protest against social injustice. This course examines the critical influence of the three most important Athenian dramatists, Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, on the works of Nobel winner Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller and important filmmakers, who have tried to recreate the powerful atmosphere and impact of the Greek tragic theater or reworked the tragic themes of classical myth for their own purposes in the modern age.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
B. Arnold
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110HD Childhood

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Did you really learn everything you needed to know in kindergarten? In this course we will explore how children's development, with a focus on early childhood (ages 0-8), is shaped by the family, school, community, cultural, and policy contexts in which they participate and live. We will read research conducted by psychologists, sociologists, and education researchers, as well as investigate representations of childhood in popular media and literature.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
J. Jacoby
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110HX The History of Space Exploration

Fall. Credits: 4

This class will delve into the history of space exploration starting with the 1960 space race between the United States and the Soviet Union. The class will continue to follow the last 60+ years of space exploration across the globe, changing from a competitive endeavor between the U.S. and the Soviet Union to the global cooperative venture it is today. Topics will include but not be limited to manned missions, technology such as unmanned rovers and high-resolution cameras, exploration missions such as Voyager, and the search for life. The class will include readings such as a fiction novel, appropriate science articles, and other relevant material. Students will be required to write several short papers and do several presentations over the semester. This class will be conducted using a seminar format where topics are introduced through various means and explored through discussion.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. McGowan
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110ID Shapeshifting and the Idea of Change

Fall. Credits: 4

How do we change? What happens when we cannot change and want to, or change when we would rather not? How can we induce changes, individually, collectively, environmentally to occur? This seminar examines the figure of shapeshifting -- bodies and beings that change their shapes- -- to think about how we alter our material reality and language, or how it alters us. Special attention will be given to fiction and creative nonfiction narratives of transition, illness/disability, environmental disaster, and afro-futurism.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Singer
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110IP Gender and Nation in Irish Poetry

Fall. Credits: 4

In this first-year seminar, we will read Irish poetry from 1798 to the contemporary moment, examining how a variety of poets engage with urgent questions of gender and nation as well as the gendered tropes of nationalism. We will pay particular attention to interventions by feminist and queer poets and Irish poets of color who resist and in some cases revolutionize dominant poetic traditions and forms. Poets will include Lady Jane Wilde, James Clarence Mangan, W.B. Yeats, Oscar Wilde, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Nuala Ni Domhnaill, Mary Dorsey, Doireann Ní Ghríofa, Nyaradzo Masunda, and Sinead Morrisey.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Martin
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110LG Slang: Community/Power/Language

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

Language is a living system. It grows and changes, despite efforts to preserve it. This course examines how slang participates in these changes. What separates slang from standard language, and who sets the standard? Through readings in linguistics and literature, this course examines how we use language to connect, create, and control.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Shea
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110LR Language as a Source of Identity

Spring. Credits: 4

Have you ever wondered how a language's socio-historical and political context shape our everyday language? Would you like to explore how a language or linguistic variation may have shaped experiences in your life and the lives of the ones around you? In this course, we'll explore how language ideologies, at different historical times and places, have an impact on our current language identities and community belonging. We'll first focus on Spanish in contact with indigenous languages, then Spanish in the U.S., and we'll finish by exploring your own language experience.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
E. García Frazier
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110MM Women and Music: Sounding Community

Fall. Credits: 4

This course surveys music in a range of women's, and womxn's, communities and ensembles--from medieval convents and "all-girl" swing bands to Cuba's Ibbu Okun and the Transcendence Gospel Choir. While the focus will be on Western art music, we will also encounter music from Afghanistan and the First Nations, working songs and playground songs, and rock/pop groups and DJ collectives. Performers will visit the class, and we will learn about the history of music ensembles at Mount Holyoke College. You do not need to be a musician or know how to read music; listening across cultures and genres, we will contemplate the opportunities and challenges of womxn-only spaces for music in the twenty-first century.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Mueller
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110NA The Imitation of Nature

Fall. Credits: 4

The imitation of nature has been one of the inspiring principles of human thought and technical advancement across the ages. Following the threads that link the ancient theories of Aristotle to the Renaissance inventions of Leonardo Da Vinci, in this course we explore the complex interaction between humans and nature, up to the contemporary development of artificial intelligence and robotics.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
M. Lovato
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110PC Op-ed: Writing on Politics, Culture, and the Arts

Fall. Credits: 4

We will read and discuss current writing on politics, culture and the arts. Drawn from a variety of print and online sources (including The New Yorker, Arts and Letters Daily, and Bomb), subjects will range from literature, cinema, and art to international politics, crime, and celebrity culture. Using strategies and techniques learned from the readings, students will write essays and articles of their own.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
P. Scotto
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110PD The Politics of Disruption

Fall. Credits: 4

Uber, Twitter, Facebook, Google -- smart technologies have transformed our world, disrupting old patterns of life, communication, work, and politics. As new technologies push us into an uncertain future, thinking critically about the positive and the negative effects of disruption has never been more important. Using a variety of materials, ranging from political philosophy and historical case studies to popular articles, podcasts, television and film, this course will help students develop their college-level critical thinking skills through exploratory and argumentative writing, personal reflection, engaged learning, and analytical discussion.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Hilton
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110PE Performing the Self

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

How do we represent ourselves as we document our lives and communicate with others? In this seminar we will move beyond critiques of selfie culture, instead analyzing self-representation as an important avenue for forming identities. We will study forms of self-representation across history and will focus on visual and new media as platforms for performing selfhood. Students will discuss the politics and aesthetics of self-fashioning across these media forms, and will execute multiple forms of self-expression, including the argumentative essay, the op-ed, the blog post, and the tweet.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
H. Goodwin
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110PS Self-Portraiture

Fall. Credits: 4

How do we represent ourselves? How can the self -- that is to say, subjective experience, private life, identity, consciousness -- be translated into written form? How, in turn, does writing fashion and construct the self? Throughout history, authors and thinkers have engaged these questions in countless texts and textual forms -- in essays, confessions, autobiographies, and poetry. This seminar will sample influential and innovative works of literary self-portrayal from around the world, exploring how a wide variety of writers have rendered themselves in language, narrative, and text. Authors may include Augustine, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Joyce, Nabokov, and Plath.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
S. Roychoudhury
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110PT Politics and Truth

Fall. Credits: 4

What is the relationship between truth and politics? Does democracy require truth or pervert it? Can truth thrive in any type of government? What's really at stake here? In this course, we will explore a variety of classic texts, ranging from such authors as Plato to Karl Marx to Hannah Arendt to Martin Luther King, Jr. to contemporary feminist theorists. We will focus on developing the ability to reflect on your own beliefs, analyze authors' arguments, and to articulate and defend your own perspective.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. Markovits
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.
Advisory: for students in their first two semesters at the College only

FYSEM-110RT Reproductive Rights and the State

Fall. Credits: 4

What is the role of governments in regulating human reproduction? How has this changed throughout the 20th and 21st century? Is reproduction an area of our private lives that should be left outside the realm of government? Or is the state actually needed to safeguard our reproductive rights? This course analyzes the history of reproductive policies in the US and compares it with cases from the global South. From family planning to population control, from woman's right to reproductive justice, we will analyze the evolution of language to name this policy arena and the way this has affected policy design. Through the use of a variety of primary and secondary sources, this course will help students improve their critical thinking, argumentative writing, and analytical skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Fernandez Anderson
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110SX Sexuality and Society

Fall. Credits: 4

What is the impact of what is included and excluded in formal sex education programs? What does it mean to maintain good sexual health? How does sexual identity relate to behavior and attraction? As a class, we will explore sexuality at an individual, interpersonal, community, and societal level. Primary topics will include sex education, sexual identity, health, consent, relationships, and media portrayals of sexuality.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Flanders
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110TG Transgressive Music

Fall. Credits: 4

The seminar will introduce and discuss various musical works and genres that fall under rock critic Ann Powers' definitions of 'Violator Art,' exploring them within the context of their wanton and disturbing appeal, as well as their often scandalous social impact. Topics will include the Second Viennese School, free jazz, protest music, punk rock, hip-hop, works such as J. S. Bach's 'Cantata No. 179,' Strauss's 'Salome,' Stravinsky's 'Le Sacre du printemps,' Billie Holiday's 'Strange Fruit,' George Crumb's 'Black Angels,' and artists such as Laurie Anderson, the Sex Pistols, Missy Elliot, and Nirvana.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
D. Sanford
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.
Notes: Students should be prepared for mature themes and some coarse language.

FYSEM-110TS The Work of Translation

Fall. Credits: 4

Mount Holyoke's mission is "purposeful engagement in the world" but in a multilingual world, our goal can only be achieved with the help of translators and interpreters. As the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts a 46% increase in translation work 2012-2022, this course will consider tranlastion as a scholarly, professional and lay activity. Challenging stereotypes of translation as derivative or faulty, we reflect on the wealth of languages and cultures at Mount Holyoke College and how the curriculum depends on the work of translation. Students discuss what is gained, lost or simply transformed in translation. This introduction to translation studies is especially valuable to students with a background or interest in languages.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
C. Shread
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110UN Underworlds (and Otherworlds)

Fall. Credits: 4

Associated with darkness, disorder, and death, the underworld can seem like a realm of punishment. But beneath its darkness, literary underworlds are sites for a character's evolution. This term, we'll see how narratives variously adapt the underworld topos. Underworlds and otherworlds connote supernatural encounters and obstacles, but they also represent realms of heightened rationalism or optimistic possibility. We'll ask what happens in a hero's passage through an underworld or otherworld that cannot happen anywhere else? How do underworlds expose challenging historical, social, psychological, and philosophical problems? And what happens when the underworld is not an exterior locus but an interior condition? Our principal method of analysis will be the close reading of texts and film.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
W. Yu
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110UW Awakenings

Fall. Credits: 4

An exploration of writing, primarily fiction, by U.S. women from around 1900 to now, focusing on the theme of awakenings. We will examine how women writers represent political awakenings, transformations of physical embodiment and psychological consciousness, and discoveries of new literary forms. We will read a diverse group of writers and and foreground interpretive frameworks of race, gender, and sexuality. Authors may include Bechdel, Chang, Chopin, Cisneros, Davis, Dunbar-Nelson, Egan, Far, Gilman, Hurston, Larsen, McCullers, Morrison, Stein, Truong, Wharton, and Yamamoto.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
E. Young
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110VM Memory and Violence

Fall. Credits: 4

We explore the memorialization of victims and survivors of mass atrocity and systemic violence, including dictatorships, displacements, genocide, poverty, and war. What are the distinctions between the cultural, historical, political, and experiences of those affected by mass and systemic violence? How do victims and survivors become agents in the process of reconciliation, reconstitution, and reconstruction of social relationships? We focus on case studies drawn from the Holocaust, genocides in Rwanda, Cambodia, and Bosnia, disappearances under dictatorships in Chile and Spain, and the current situation of refugees crossing the Mediterranean Sea and the US-Mexican border.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110VT Jack the Ripper and the Making of Late-Victorian London

Fall. Credits: 4

In the summer and fall of 1888, a series of gruesome murders captured the attention of Londoners and brought questions of class, gender, race and social-economic change to the forefront of public debate. Though the culprit was never identified, Jack the Ripper became synonymous with the perceived dangers of late-Victorian London. Using newspapers, periodicals, police archives, and other sources from the period, this course will set students on an historical investigation of the "Whitechapel Murders," seeking to understand the event, its historical context, and the way historians have interpreted its meaning.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

FYSEM-110XT 1619: U.S. Slavery and Its Legacy

Fall. Credits: 4

This seminar will examine The New York Times' 1619 Project -- an examination of slavery in the historical and ongoing political and social development of the United States -- from many sides. Beginning our approach of this work as a body of scholarly and popular writing, we will critically scrutinize how these arguments are presented and why they do or do not work in their current forms, questions that will include the criticism of the series voiced by professional historians. The seminar is geared for students not only interested in learning about how slavery has shaped diverse aspects of American life, such as its arts, music, economics and politics, but also how authors, write and make arguments for the reading public.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Aslam
Restrictions: Mount Holyoke first-year students only, by placement.

GEOG-105 World Regional Geography

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course surveys the major geographic regions of the world in terms of environmental features and resource distributions, economic mainstays, population characteristics, cultural processes, social relationships, and patterns of urbanization and industrial growth. In addition to these topical foci, we use various sub-fields of geography to animate different regions. This approach provides a sense of depth while we also pursue a breadth of knowledge about the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Houston

GEOG-107 Introduction to the Physical Environment

Fall. Credits: 4

A systematic introduction to the ecological processes operating on the surface of the earth, their spatial variation and their contribution to the spatial patterning of life on earth. The course stresses interactions among the earth's energy balance, weather, ecological resources and human impacts on environmental systems.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
T. Millette

GEOG-202 Cities in a Global Context

Spring. Credits: 4

Cities are dynamic landscapes informed by myriad economic, political, social, environmental, and cultural processes. This course delves into the forces of urbanization and examines how cities have been investigated, built, experienced, and lived in throughout history and around the globe. By accenting a geographic perspective and drawing upon an array of theoretical ideas and empirical examples, this class grapples with the fascinating complexities of the urban context.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Houston

GEOG-204 Human Dimensions of Environmental Change

Fall. Credits: 4

Using regional case studies from across the world, this course examines some of the causes and consequences of human-induced environmental changes. The course explores the fundamental relationships and processes involved in human-environmental interactions; the various impacts that humans have had over time upon soils, water, flora, fauna, landforms, and the atmosphere; and possible alternative development strategies that could create a balance between human needs and environmental sustainability

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
G. Kebbede

GEOG-205 Mapping and Spatial Analysis

Spring. Credits: 4

Provides a comprehensive introduction to maps, including their design, compilation, and computer production. Introduces students to the principles of abstracting the Earth's surface into spatial databases using GIS, remote sensing, and Global Positioning Satellites.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
T. Millette

GEOG-206 Political Geography

Spring. Credits: 4

Systemically studies political phenomena and their geographic expression, at a variety of spatial scales -- national, regional, and international. Major themes include nation-state formation, boundary, territory, and ethnic issues, regional blocs and spheres of influence, and conflicts over access to and use of resources.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
G. Kebbede

GEOG-208 Global Movements: Migrations, Refugees and Diasporas

Fall. Credits: 4

The voluntary and involuntary movement of people around the globe is the focus of this course on migrations, refugees, and diasporas. Questions of borders, nativism, transnationalism, the global economy, and legality thread through this course as we consider the many social, cultural, environmental, economic, and political factors shaping decisions to leave a home or homeland. Historical and contemporary case studies, compelling theoretical texts, and geographic perspectives on these topics collectively animate our discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
S. Houston

GEOG-210 GIS for the Social Sciences and Humanities

Fall. Credits: 4

This course introduces the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other geospatial technologies in the social sciences and the humanities. The student will learn to collect, process, and analyze quantitative data within the spatial (geographic) context where they occur. Course content may include research topics from current faculty.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Marcano
Advisory: Proficiency with computers and quantitative data analysis

GEOG-213 Sustainable Cities

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Based on present estimates, for the first time in human history, more people now live in urban than rural areas, and population growth projections for the next century indicate that most growth will take place in urban areas. Given this context, this course examines the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of urban sustainability. Topics explored in the course include urban and ecological systems, air and water quality, green design, energy and transportation systems, demographic trends, climate change impacts, and the role of technology in promoting urban sustainability.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
T. Millette

GEOG-217 The African Environments

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The course provides an integrated analysis of biogeography, environmental change, and hydrology within each of the biomes found in the African continent: forest, savanna, desert, coast, wetland, mountain, and Mediterranean environments. It also discusses the impact and significance of human activity on African environments by exploring debates about land degradation, climate change, biodiversity and depletion, and conservation and development.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
G. Kebbede

GEOG-224 Atmosphere and Weather

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides a detailed introduction to the earth's atmosphere with particular emphasis on the troposphere extending from the surface to 10km in elevation. Topics include the earth's solar energy budget, atmospheric pressure and wind systems, global and local meteorological processes, and weather forecasting. The class will make significant use of meteorological data and satellite imagery taken from NOAA's National Weather Service to study seasonal weather patterns, rain and snow events, and catastrophic hurricanes.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
T. Millette
Prereq: Any 100-level natural science course.
Advisory: Students who have taken high school earth science but not a college-level natural science course are welcome to request instructor permission to enroll.

GEOG-230 Environmental Soil Science

Spring. Credits: 4

Introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils and their relationship to environmental quality, agricultural production, and land management. This course will also describe the processes of origin and development of soils as natural entities and how they affect the different ecosystems where they are located. Some field work required.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Marcano
Prereq: Any 100 or 200 level science course or GEOG-107.

GEOG-241 Topics in Geography

GEOG-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GEOG-304 Planning and the Environment

GEOG-304UP Planning and the Environment: 'Urban Planning'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course examines in detail the fabric of urban and suburban settlement and commerce in the pre and post WW II U.S. Field trips to the greater Springfield area are used to allow students to develop firsthand understanding of interactions between urban and suburban areas and to recognize the major changes to the human landscape driven by suburbanization and urban abandonment. This class will examine the section of Springfield slated for the MGM Casino Development.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
T. Millette
Prereq: Any 200-level Geography course.

GEOG-313 Third World Development

Fall. Credits: 4

Offers an interdisciplinary perspective on social, economic, and political features of contemporary development in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, regions referred to as the Third World or the South, and provides an introduction to theoretical origins and definitions of economic growth, development, and underdevelopment. It then addresses more specific aspects of development such as trends in population growth, migration, and urbanization; agrarian change; livelihood strategies and aspects of social welfare such as health, education, and shelter; poverty and the environment; and social justice. The latter part of the course draws extensively on selected case studies.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
G. Kebbede
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: One course in geography or one related social sciences course.

GEOG-319 Africa: Problems and Prospects

Spring. Credits: 4

This course intends to offer an interdisciplinary perspective on selected contemporary development problems in Africa south of the Sahara. Central to the course will be an examination of the social, economic, and political consequences of colonialism, the physical resource base and ecological crisis, agrarian systems and rural development, gender relations and development, urbanization and industrialization, and the problems and prospects of regional cooperation and integration.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
G. Kebbede
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: One course in geography or one related social sciences course.

GEOG-320 Research with Geospatial Technologies

Fall. Credits: 4

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing are essential tools for geographic analysis in both the biophysical and social sciences. This course uses a semester-long project that includes field and laboratory instruction to allow students to develop hands-on skills with spatial data and analysis software. Students will be able to present potential employers with a portfolio containing examples of their ability to develop and execute a GIS/remote sensing application project.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
T. Millette
Prereq: GEOG-205 or GEOG-210.

GEOG-325 Conflict and Displacement in Africa

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course provides an analytical approach to the study of civil/armed conflicts and displacement in post-independent Africa. Using cases from West Africa, Horn of Africa, and the Great Lake region, the course examines geographic, political and economic contexts in which armed conflicts occur by identifying and evaluating competing explanations of the underpinnings of civil conflicts. It analyzes the role of some of the widely debated features of Africa's civil conflicts, including systems of governance, impact of natural resources, questions of sovereignty and self-determination, construction and manipulation of ethnic/cultural identities, impact of religion, and regional inequalities.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
G. Kebbede
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors

GEOG-328 Climate Migration

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar focuses on climate change-induced human migration from both theoretical and applied perspectives. It examines the predicted scope of this population movement and considers international instruments that could shape responses to this growing category of migrants. A set of contemporary case studies from around the world animate our investigation into what it means to adapt to an altered environment and inform our questions about responsibility for climate change. Throughout the semester, students will grapple with the complex environmental, economic, cultural, and political intersections of migration and Earth's changing climate system.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
S. Houston
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in a related 200-level social science course

GEOG-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

GEOG-399 Getting Ahead in Geology and Geography

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course provides mentoring for geology and geography majors as they pursue internships, summer jobs, independent research, graduate study, and careers. Experiences include: resume and communication workshops; self-reflection and sharing opportunities for students returning from internships, work experiences, and semesters abroad; guidance on preparing for, selecting, and applying to graduate school; and unconditional support for career exploration.

Crosslisted as: GEOL-399
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Markley
Restrictions: This course is limited to Geography and Geology majors and minors
Notes: Repeatable. Credit/no credit grading. Course meets on Fridays after Earth Adventures

GEOL-103 Oceanography

Spring. Credits: 4

Because more than seventy percent of our planet is covered by oceans, the study of marine systems is crucial to our understanding of Earth History and life on the planet. We will examine chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes in the oceans at a variety of scales in time and space. We will explore how the Earth's oceans formed, how they provided the foundations for life, and how they continue to affect weather and climate, stabilize global chemical cycles, erode coastlines and provide access to resources. We will conclude the semester with a discussion of the human impact on the ocean environment including sea level rise, acidification, coral bleaching and over-fishing.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Werner
Advisory: Potential Environmental Studies and Geology majors should consider taking GEOL-123 concurrently with this course.

GEOL-107 Environmental Geology

Fall. Credits: 4

The only planet known to sustain life, Earth provides all the resources that sustain us, yet at the same time it can be an unpredictable and sometimes dangerous home. Floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and other natural processes challenge our ingenuity, while we also contend with self-induced problems such as pollution, desertification, and even global climate change. This course examines earth processes, how these affect our lives, and how we can best live with and sustain our environment. May be taken for 200-level credit with permission of instructor.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Dunn
Advisory: Potential Environmental Studies and Geology majors should consider taking GEOL-123.

GEOL-108 Precious Drops: The Geology of Groundwater and Fossil Fuels

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Are we running out of drinking water? Is fracking safe? When is peak oil? This course is a basic geology course that focuses on two earth materials we use every day: fresh water and fossil fuels. We cover where groundwater is found and why, the depletion and contamination of groundwater, and some major aquifers. We will also explore the formation, worldwide distribution, and extraction of coal, oil, and natural gas. This course introduces students to physical and historical geology, focusing particularly on plate tectonics and sedimentary basins, with attention to current events and illustrations from around the world.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Markley
Advisory: Potential Environmental Studies and Geology majors should consider taking GEOL-123 concurrently with this course.

GEOL-109 History of Life

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Life forms have inhabited the surface of our planet for most of its history. Earth, as a result, has a strange geology unlike that of any other known planet. In this course we will examine the interrelations between life processes and Earth's crust and atmosphere, and how these relationships interact to generate the geology of the planet. By means of hands-on analysis of rocks and fossils, we will study the origin and evolution of life, the diversification of complex life forms, the appearance of large predators, and the causes and consequences of oxygenation of the atmosphere.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. McMenamin
Advisory: Potential Environmental Studies and Geology majors should consider taking GEOL-123 concurrently with this course.

GEOL-116 Art in Paleontology

Spring. Credits: 4

Paleontological art brings ancient organisms back to life. In this course we will consider the role that "PaleoArt" itself plays as a mode of scientific discovery. Beginning with an analysis of the pioneering paleoart of Charles R. Knight, we will examine how paleoartists have uncovered key information about prehistoric life well in advance of its recognition by the scientific community. In a collaborative class project, we will identify the best and most representative works for a possible display somewhere on campus. For individual final class projects, students may choose between a research paper and presentation, and their own paleontological artwork in any visual medium. For the latter, students will be able to utilize resources of the Fimbel Maker and Innovation Lab.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. McMenamin

GEOL-123 Methods in Earth Science

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course provides a hands-on introduction to earth science and methods in geology. Students will learn the fundamental tools of the trade and explore local geology. Interactive laboratory work will include projects on groundwater contamination, landfill siting, geologic hazards, and earth materials. Students will also develop skills in reading topographic and geologic maps.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Advisory: This is an excellent stand-alone introduction to the geosciences, and also works very well if taken concurrently with any 100-level geology course.

GEOL-126 The Cambrian Explosion

Fall. Credits: 4

The origin of animals was arguably the most important event in earth history. In this course we will review the history of earth, learn basic geology, and then examine the problem of the origin of animals by studying Mount Holyoke College's superb and unique collection of Proterozoic and Cambrian fossils. The emergence of animals has been called the Cambrian explosion. We will examine what this means for our understanding of evolution as we evaluate hypotheses proposed to explain the relatively sudden appearance of more than half of known animal phyla during the Cambrian event.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. McMenamin

GEOL-131 Introduction to Hydrology: A Data Perspective

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Understanding hydrology (the distribution and movement of water at the earth's surface) is critical for resource management and climate modeling. With an eye toward these applications, we will use observational data to explore the components of the water cycle (precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and streamflow) and the physical processes that govern them. Lectures and hands-on computer exercises are aimed at students with interests in earth and environmental science or data science. No previous experience is necessary. Students will receive an introduction to statistics, computer programming, data visualization techniques, and available environmental data sources.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department

GEOL-133 Mass Extinction, Dinosaurs and Ecological Recovery

Spring. Credits: 4

Beginning in Precambrian time over a half billion years ago, mass extinctions have periodically decimated earth's biota and left the biosphere in ruins. For example, both the Permo-Triassic and the End-Cretaceous mass extinctions reshaped life on earth and initiated new geological eras. In this course we will examine why mass extinctions occur and study the ways in which the biosphere recovers from mass extinction events. We will also evaluate the claim that we humans are causing a mass extinction and examine proposals regarding the steps we might take to hasten biospheric recovery.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. McMenamin
Prereq: Any one course in biology, chemistry, environmental studies, geology, or physics.

GEOL-137 Dinosaurs

Fall. Credits: 4

The first dinosaur fossils to be recognized in North America, footprints of the creatures, were found in South Hadley. The very first dinosaur species described by a woman researcher, and one of the most ancient dinosaur species in the United States (Podokesaurus holyokensis), was discovered close to the Mount Holyoke campus. In this course we will learn the main types of non-avian dinosaurs, compare them to other ancient and modern vertebrates, assess their relationship to birds, debate their physiology (cold-blooded or warm blooded?), examine the ecology of the world they inhabited, and by means of field work, rock drilling and excavation, resume the search for a new specimen of Podokesaurus. To complete the final project, students will select a dinosaur species and study its geological age, geographic distribution, environmental preferences, ecological roles, feeding and reproductive strategies, and body form as they review the history of attempts to reconstruct their adopted dinosaur.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
M. McMenamin

GEOL-141 Making the Past: Geosciences in the Makerspace

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

The great German paleontologist Dolf Seilacher once remarked that "drawing enforces careful observation." As a consequence, Seilacher drew all of the illustrations for his influential scientific publications. Taking Seilacher's insight into three dimensions, in this course we will utilize Mount Holyoke's Makerspace to reconstruct ancient organisms. Studies have shown that well-crafted reconstructions of ancient creatures contribute substantially to improved scientific interpretation of their functional morphology, behavior and paleoecological role(s). We will use Makerspace resources, Pixologic's Sculptris, 3D printing and other tools to improve our understanding of the morphologies and activities of ancient organisms, while gleaning information derived from the rock record to analyze their ancient morphologies and behaviors.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. McMenamin

GEOL-201 Rocks and Minerals

Fall. Credits: 4

In this course you will learn to recognize the common rock-forming minerals and principal rock types, and to understand their origins, properties, associations, and geological significance. Observational skills and hand sample identification will be emphasized in lab.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Dunn
Coreq: GEOL-201L.
Advisory: Students must have either a one-year high school earth science class or any 100- or 200-level geology course or GEOG-107.

GEOL-202 History of Earth

Spring. Credits: 4

This course explores the evolution and interaction of life, rocks, oceans, and air during the past 4 billion years of earth history. Some topics covered are: the geologic time scale, significant events in earth history, ice ages and greenhouse atmospheres, continental drift, extinctions and radiations of flora and fauna, the geology of the anthropocene, and absolute and relative dating of rocks. Oral presentations and writing assignments focus on the design and testing of earth science hypotheses, critical analysis of recently published research on earth history, and proposal writing.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Markley
Prereq: One 100-level Geology course.

GEOL-203 The Earth's Surface

Fall. Credits: 4

The surface of the Earth is a history book of past environmental change. Every hill and valley, every erosional feature and every deposit is the result of processes acting at the Earth's surface. In this course we study these processes (e.g. glaciers, rivers, slopes, coastlines, arid regions, frozen ground, cave formation, soil development and groundwater) to understand how they work and to understand the resulting landforms and deposits. With this understanding we can then observe different landforms and deposits and infer past processes (i.e. environments of deposition). Field work and trips allow students to explore first-hand the processes that have created and modified the Earth's surface.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Werner
Prereq: One 100-level Geology course. Coreq: GEOL-203L.

GEOL-210 Plate Tectonics

Fall. Credits: 4

Plate tectonic theory explains the origins of volcanoes and earthquakes, continental drift, and the locations of mountain belts and oceans. This course focuses on the geometry of plate tectonics. Topics include mid-ocean ridge systems, transform faults, subduction zones, relative plate motion, earthquake analysis, triple point junctions, and stereographic projection. Work includes individual research projects on active plate boundaries.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
M. Markley
Prereq: Any 100-level Geology course.
Advisory: Comfort with geometry and trigonometry required.

GEOL-211 Uranium

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

From the A-bomb to zircon, uranium has revolutionized humanity's destructive potential and wisdom about time. Uranium is the planet's heaviest naturally occurring element, and it transforms by both radioactive decay and nuclear fission. This course uses computer modeling to explore these two transformations and what we make of them, specifically: the age of the earth, high-precision dating of recent geologic and climate events, nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and radiation and health. Writing and reading assignments focus on science communication for a general audience.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Markley
Prereq: One course in Chemistry, Geology, Math, or Statistics.

GEOL-224 Sedimentary Geology

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Sedimentary rocks provide us with repositories of fresh water, hydrocarbons, and other critical raw materials, as well as geological evidence for the history of planet earth. This course will introduce students to the study of sedimentary rocks and their environments of deposition, with a focus on the varied processes of sediment accumulation. We will employ the principles of stratigraphic analysis and correlation to interpret ancient environments, paleoclimate, and paleogeography, and use these tools to probe the characteristics of sedimentary basins. Field trips will introduce a variety of analytical techniques used to study sedimentary rocks.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. McMenamin
Prereq: Any one course in biology, chemistry, environmental studies, geology, or physics.

GEOL-227 Groundwater Geology

Spring. Credits: 4

The demand for and the contamination of groundwater resources are major environmental concerns. To better understand the dynamics of the groundwater system, we will cover topics including the hydrologic cycle, surface and subsurface hydrology, groundwater resource evaluation, and groundwater contamination.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
A. Werner
Prereq: One Geology course or ENVST-200. Coreq: GEOL-227L.

GEOL-240 Geological Resources and the Environment

Spring. Credits: 4

This course surveys the geology and exploitation of important mineral deposits and energy resources. We will discuss factors that govern the economics of their production and the environmental implications of their extraction and use.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Dunn

GEOL-247 Environmental Modeling & Statistics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Models are simple representations of the real world, which can be used to convey information, generate and test hypotheses, and make predictions about what will happen in the future. This course introduces students to the art and science of modeling natural systems, as well as their mathematical and statistical foundations. Students will gain experience in asking research questions, creating hypotheses, collecting and arranging data, and designing computer models (in R) to address a variety of environmental problems. This course will include lecture and hands-on computer exercises and is aimed at students with interests in earth and environmental science or data science.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
The department
Prereq: One of the following: STAT-140, GEOG-107, GEOL-107, ENVST-200, BIOL-223, or COMSC-101.

GEOL-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

GEOL-322 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

Spring. Credits: 4

This course covers mineralogical and chemical compositions, classification, genesis, and mode of occurrence of igneous and metamorphic rocks, including relationships between rock-forming processes and global plate tectonics; labs involve the study of representative rock suites in hand specimen and thin section, introduction to analytical techniques and in-depth coverage of mineral optics.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
S. Dunn
Prereq: GEOL-201 and CHEM-150. CHEM-150 may be taken concurrently. Coreq: GEOL-322L.

GEOL-326 Seminar: Global Climate Change

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Earth's dynamic climate system is rapidly changing. This course will introduce you to the science behind climate change predictions as they apply to past, present, and future changes in our earth's climate. We will also discuss how, over the course of time, we adapted to these changing conditions with a specific focus on water resources and natural disasters, including floods, droughts, and hurricanes that have been predicted to intensify in response to ongoing climate change.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Prereq: One Geology or Environmental Studies course at the 200-level.

GEOL-333 Structural Geology and Orogenesis

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course covers the basic techniques of field geology and structural analysis. Lectures concentrate on field techniques, stress, strain, faulting, folding, rock strength, deformation mechanisms, and multidisciplinary approaches to mountain building (orogenesis). Many labs are field trips that involve data collection. Weekly writing assignments focus on presenting original research and distinguishing between observations and interpretations.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Markley
Prereq: GEOL-123 and GEOL-201. GEOL-201 may be taken concurrently. Coreq: GEOL-333L.

GEOL-342 Seminar in Geology

Seminars offer directed study and discussion of one or more selected topics in geology. Topics vary from year to year. Consult the department for information about future seminars.

GEOL-342DV Seminar in Geology: 'Death Valley Field Course'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This seminar will cover selected topics on the geology of Death Valley region, California. We will meet for two hours per week up until spring break, then embark on a nine-day field trip to Death Valley National Park, March 2021. A participation fee is required. Students will be responsible for researching particular topics and presenting a final report.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Markley, M. McMenamen
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: Two geology courses.

GEOL-342HY Seminar in Geology: ''Geology and Hydrology Underfoot'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

To avoid the worst of climate change we must wean ourselves from fossil fuels and develop and use more sustainable methods of heating and cooling. Is it possible to replace our central heating plant with heat from earth? What are the rocks that underlie campus and how does ground water move through them? In this course we will learn about the geology of the Connecticut Valley to better understand the geology under our campus. Using borehole geophysical and temperature data collected from a deep well on campus, we will correlate the borehole stratigraphy with the regional valley stratigraphy and we will assess the hydrology and geothermal potential of the geology beneath campus.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
M. Markley, A. Werner
Prereq: One of the following: GEOL-201, GEOL-202, GEOL-203, GEOL-224, GEOL-247, ENVST-200. Coreq: GEOL-342HYL.

GEOL-342PE Seminar in Geology: 'Plastics in the Environment'

Fall. Credits: 4

Plastics are a part of everyday life. They are inexpensive, lightweight, last forever, and are accumulating in the environment. Macro-plastics are killing whales and micro-plastics are ingested by plankton. Studies have found micro-plastics in remote areas of the planet and in rainwater indicating wide-scale atmospheric transport and deposition. This seminar is aimed at understanding plastics as a material, how they are used, the ways they enter the environment, the ecological and health impacts and potential solutions to the problem. There will be weekly readings with faculty or student-led discussions. A term paper on a plastics topic of your choice will culminate the course.

Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
A. Werner
Prereq: 8 credits in the sciences.

GEOL-343 Applied Environmental Geology

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This field-based course focuses on assessing the environmental impact of applied road salt in two local hill towns. Each week we will leave campus to collect snow and water samples along the main road corridors for subsequent lab analysis. Because this course is all about road salt and snow we will brave the coldest and snowiest conditions to collect our samples. Each student will pursue their own independent research project but will work collaboratively with other students in the class.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-343
Applies to requirement(s): Math & Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning
A. Werner
Prereq: GEOG-203 or ENVST-200. Coreq: GEOL-343L.
Advisory: Warm clothes and a good attitude are the main prerequisites for this course.

GEOL-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

GEOL-399 Getting Ahead in Geology and Geography

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

This course provides mentoring for geology and geography majors as they pursue internships, summer jobs, independent research, graduate study, and careers. Experiences include: resume and communication workshops; self-reflection and sharing opportunities for students returning from internships, work experiences, and semesters abroad; guidance on preparing for, selecting, and applying to graduate school; and unconditional support for career exploration.

Crosslisted as: GEOG-399
Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Markley
Restrictions: This course is limited to Geography and Geology majors and minors
Notes: Repeatable. Credit/no credit grading. Course meets on Fridays after Earth Adventures.

GNDST-101 Introduction to Gender Studies

Fall and Spring. Credits: 4

This course is designed to introduce students to social, cultural, historical, and political perspectives on gender and its construction. Through discussion and writing, we will explore the intersections among gender, race, class, and sexuality in multiple settings and contexts. Taking an interdisciplinary approach to a variety of questions, we will consider the distinctions between sex and gender, women's economic status, the making of masculinity, sexual violence, queer movements, racism, and the challenges of feminist activism across nations, and possibilities for change. We will also examine the development of feminist theory, including its promises and challenges.

Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
R. Barnes, C. Gundermann, J. Luce, S. Smith

GNDST-201 Methods and Practices in Feminist Scholarship

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a class about doing research as a feminist. We will explore questions such as: What makes feminist research feminist? What makes it research? What are the proper objects of feminist research? Who can do feminist research? What can feminist research do? Are there feminist ways of doing research? Why and how do the stories we tell in our research matter? Some of the key issues and themes we will address include: accountability, location, citational practices and politics, identifying stakes and stakeholders, intersectionality, inter/disciplinarity, choosing and describing our topics and methods, and research as storytelling. The class will be writing intensive and will culminate in each student producing a research portfolio.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
J. Luce
Prereq: GNDST-101.

GNDST-204 Women and Gender in the Study of Culture

GNDST-204BD Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Body and Space'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course focuses on the issues surrounding body and space through installation, performance, and public arts. Students explore the possibilities of body as an energetic instrument, while investigating the connotations of various spaces as visual vocabulary. The self becomes the reservoir for expression. The course examines the transformational qualities of the body as the conduit that links conceptual and physical properties of materials and ideas.

Crosslisted as: ARTST-266
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
R. Hachiyanagi
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Advisory: No previous studio experience required.
Notes: Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for some of the cost of course materials.

GNDST-204CP Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Trap Doors and Glittering Closets: Queer/Trans* of Color Politics of Recognition, Legibility, Visibility and Aesthetics'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In 2014, Time magazine declared the "Transgender Tipping Point" as a popular moment of transgender people's arrival into the mainstream. Using a queer and trans* of color critique, this course will unpack the political discourses and seeming binaries surrounding visibility/invisibility, recognition/misrecognition, legibility/illegibility, belonging/unbelonging and aesthetics/utility. How might we grapple with the contradictions of the trapdoors, pitfalls, dark corners and glittering closets that structure and normalize violence for some while safeguarding violence for others? This course will center the 2017 anthology Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility.

Crosslisted as: CST-249CP
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
R. Hwang
Prereq: One course in Gender Studies or Critical Social Thought.

GNDST-204CR Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Critical Latinx/ Indigeneities'

Fall. Credits: 4

an evolving field, Latina/o Studies has begun to critically and comparatively question the terms of Indigeneity in relation to Native communities in the U.S. land mass. This course seeks to understand the emergence of critical Latinx/Indigenous perspectives as they relate to Latinas/os/xes in the United States, and their uneven connections to various transnational forms of Indigeneity rooted in ancestral land-based ties in the United States, Mexico, and Central and South America. We will examine current discussions of Chicanidad, migrant Indigeneity, colonialisms, empire, and Indigenous sovereignty.

Crosslisted as: LATST-250CR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Madrigal

GNDST-204CW Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Androgyny and Gender Negotiation in Contemporary Chinese Women's Theater'

Fall. Credits: 4

Yue Opera, an all-female art that flourished in Shanghai in 1923, resulted from China's social changes and the women's movement. Combining traditional with modern forms and Chinese with Western cultures, Yue Opera today attracts loyal and enthusiastic audiences despite pop arts crazes. We will focus on how audiences, particularly women, are fascinated by gender renegotiations as well as by the all-female cast. The class will read and watch classics of this theater, including Romance of the Western Bower, Peony Pavilion, and Butterfly Lovers. Students will also learn the basics of traditional Chinese opera.

Crosslisted as: ASIAN-215, FMT-230CW
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Multicultural Perspectives
Y. Wang
Notes: Taught in English

GNDST-204EM Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Embodiment in Theory: Precarious Lives from Marx to Butler'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We examine the writing of major nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century theorists, such as Marx, Nietzche, Freud, Dubois, Arendt, Fanon, Foucault, Butler, and others through the lens of embodiment. Rather than read theory as an abstract entity, we explore how theory itself is an embodiment of actual lives in which human beings experience life as precarious. What are the social conditions that create vulnerable bodies? How do thinkers who lived or are living precarious lives represent these bodies? Through a series of case studies based on contemporary examples of precarity, we examine the legacy and materiality of critical social thought.

Crosslisted as: GRMST-231EM, CST-249EM
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
K. Remmler

GNDST-204ET Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Rovers, Cuckqueens, and Country Wives of All Kinds: The Queer Eighteenth Century'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With the rise of the two-sex model, the eighteenth century might be seen to be a bastion of heteronormativity leading directly to Victorian cis-gender binary roles of angel in the house and the bourgeois patriarch. Yet, beginning with the Restoration's reinvention of ribald theater, this period was host to a radical array of experimentation in gender and sexuality, alongside intense play with genre (e.g., the invention of the novel). We will explore queerness in all its forms alongside consideration of how to write queer literary histories.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-232
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Notes: This course is part of a two-semester sequence with Nonbinary Romanticism, but students are encouraged to take either course separately.

GNDST-204GV Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Gendered Violence from Medieval to Contemporary Spain'

Spring. Credits: 4

This survey course will review the complex interaction of gender and violence as a personal and institutional issue in Spain from Medieval times to the present. What are the ideological and sociocultural constructs that sustain and perpetuate violence against women? What are the forms of resistance women have put into play? Among the texts, we will study short stories by Lucanor (thirteenth century) and María de Zayas (seventeenth century), song by Bebé and movie by Boya&iacuten (twentieth century), contemporary news (twenty-first century), and laws (from the thirteenth century to the present).

Crosslisted as: SPAN-230GV
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities; Language
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
N. Romero-Díaz
Prereq: SPAN-212.
Notes: Taught in Spanish.

GNDST-204NB Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Nonbinary Romanticism: Genders, Sexes, and Beings in the Age of Revolution'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With the onslaught of American, French, Haitian, and South American revolts and revolutions, the Atlantic world, much of Europe, and its colonial/industrial empire were thrown into a period of refiguring the concept of the raced, national, and gendered subject. This course considers what new forms of gender, sex, sexuality, and being were created, practiced, or thought, however momentarily, in this tumultuous age. Specific attention is given to conceptions of nonbinary being (of all varieties). Authors may include E. Darwin, Equiano, Wollstonecraft, Lister, M. Shelley, Byron, Jacobs.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-233
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
K. Singer
Notes: This course is a second part of a two-course sequence with ENGL-232/GNDST-204ET, but each may be taken separately. Contact the instructor for permission if you have not taken ENGL-232 or GNDST-204ET.

GNDST-204QT Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Queer and Trans Writing'

Spring. Credits: 4

What do we mean when we say "queer writing" or "trans writing"? Are we talking about writing by queer and/or trans authors? Writing about queer or trans practices, identities, experience? Writing that subverts conventional forms? All of the above? In this course, we will engage these questions not theoretically but through praxis. We will read fiction, poetry, comics, creative nonfiction, and hybrid forms. Expect to encounter work that challenges you in terms of form and content. Some writers we may read include Ryka Aoki, James Baldwin, Tom Cho, Samuel R. Delany, kari edwards, Elisha Lim, Audre Lorde, Cherríe Moraga, Eileen Myles, and David Wojnarowicz.

Crosslisted as: ENGL-219QT
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
A. Lawlor
Prereq: ENGL-201 and 4 credits in Gender Studies

GNDST-204RP Women and Gender in the Study of Culture: 'Race, Racism, and Power'

Fall. Credits: 4

This course analyzes the concepts of race and racism from an interdisciplinary perspective, with focus on Latinas/os/x in the United States. It explores the sociocultural, political, economic, and historical forces that interact with each other in the production of racial categories and racial "difference." In particular, we focus on racial ideologies, racial formation theory, and processes of racialization, as well as the relationship between race and ethnicity. The course examines racial inequality from a historical perspective and investigates how racial categories evolve and form across contexts. The analysis that develops will ultimately allow us to