Summer and January Courses

Roberto Mugnani, Director

Amy Nichols, Senior Administrative Assistant


Merrill House
413-538-3478
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/professional-graduate/courses

Overview and Contact Information

During the summer and in January, graduate and undergraduate courses are offered through Mount Holyoke's Professional and Graduate Education (PaGE) programs. Courses are available for academic credit, professional development, and personal enrichment. 

Courses are open to students from any college or university as well as to community members. Students who are already enrolled in a PaGE Master's degree program do not need to submit a separate application to register for summer or January courses.

Students enrolled in Mount Holyoke's Bachelor of Arts programs are welcome to apply and enroll in summer and January course offerings. Credits earned by undergraduate students are not automatically applied towards degree requirements.  Credits earned through PaGE courses must qualify as transfer credits per the College's usual transfer credit policies in order to be applied toward the Bachelor of Arts degree. Grades and GPA appear on a Mount Holyoke non-matriculated student transcript and do not appear on the Mount Holyoke undergraduate or graduate transcripts.

All courses, workshops, seminars, and institutes offered through Mount Holyoke’s Professional and Graduate Education (PaGE) programs are coeducational.

Susan Daniels, Graduate, Professional Actor Training, Drama Studio London, B.A., Mount Holyoke College

Rick Feldman, M.P.A., University of Massachusetts Amherst

Leora Fridman, M.F.A., University of Massachusetts Amherst

Janelle Gagnon, M.A., Mount Holyoke College

Holly Graham, Ed.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst

Nicole Gilbert Cote, M.S., University of Massachusetts Amherst; M.A., Mount Holyoke College

Jeffrey Guiel, J.D., Western New England College School of Law

Darren Hamilton, Ph.D., University of Southampton

James Hanson, M.A.T., Mount Holyoke College

Himali Jayathilake, Ph.D., Wayne State University

Cheryl Lavigne, M.A., Mount Holyoke College

Yan Ma, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Amy Martin, Ph.D., Columbia University

Matteo Pangallo, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst

Lorna Ritz, M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art

Tom Schiele, M.A., Simmons College

Mark Shea, Ph.D., Michigan State University

Gary Snyder, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology

Noah Tuleja, M.F.A., Indiana University

Nicole Michaud Wild, Ph.D., University at Albany, State University of New York

All courses, workshops, seminars, and institutes offered through Mount Holyoke's Professional and Graduate Education (PaGE) programs are coeducational.

Students who are already enrolled in a PaGE Master's degree program do not need to submit a separate application to register for summer or January courses. 

To apply as a non-degree student for summer or January courses, students will need to submit an application via the online application.

Financing

Please see Graduate Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid for further information.

Course Offerings

X.ART-246 Introduction to Contemporary Art

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

In this course, by drawing on methods that have risen to prominence in art history since its "global turn," we will emphasize the historical contexts for various art currents. We will analyze the diverse artistic, discursive, and economic practices that have constituted contemporary art around the world since 1980. While studying artists from six continents, the class also will examine the venues in which contemporary art is exhibited. Topics will include artists in Port-au-Spain, Trinidad, and Nigeria; public art in Marfa, Texas, and Moscow; biennials in Sao Paulo and Shanghai; and art fairs in Sharjuah and New Delhi.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
A. Gilvin

X.ART-252 Color Theory: A Travelogue in Color

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This is a rigorous course that enables artists to deepen how 'seeing' nature translates to a flat surface, while maintaining the illusion of depth. Coupled with exploring paint, or oil crayon, emphasis rests on expanding drawing skills. Continual observation from actual paintings in the Museum are available to us. Artists can work from either a model, or a still-life.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Ritz

X.BIOL-207 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy with Lab

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will study the structures that allow vertebrates to perform basic functions in an evolutionary context. We will connect the functions with day-to-day challenges for vertebrates, and we will discuss disruption such as disease and trauma. In lab we will dissect fresh frozen and formaline preserved vertebrates emphasizing mammals. A willingness to work with such preserved material is critical to your success in class. Students are expected to work in groups during class time, as well as read required chapters BEFORE class. This class requires you to memorize the names of several structures in a functional context.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
P. Brennan
Coreq: X.BIOL-207L.

X.BIOL-228 Human Physiology with Lab

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

With humans as our primary model system, we will cover cellular and general tissue physiology and the endocrine, nervous, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and renal organ system. Primary emphasis is on functional processes in these systems and on cellular and molecular mechanisms common across systems. Students will engage in class problems, lectures, and laboratory activities designed to strengthen knowledge of physiological concepts and of fundamental scientific, quantitative, and analysis skills.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Gill
Coreq: X.BIOL-228L.
Advisory: Human Anatomy I expected, but not required.

X.BUS-418 Project Management for Nonprofits and Social Entrepreneurs

Credits: 2

There is one clear skill that all exceptional project managers (PMs) possess, "the ability to formulate alternatives." Those PMs with either the innate or developed ability to provide multiple solutions to problems and further create contingency plans if their solutions are not successful, find themselves working on projects that are delivered on-time, at or under-budget, and within the functional and/or technical satisfaction of their customer. Your goal is to identify and begin to develop this ability during this course. More importantly, it will provide you a platform to continue to grow, refine and implement this skill all under the umbrella of good project management approaches and practices. You will be able to identify, plan, schedule, cost estimate, implement and manage projects of virtually any size.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
E. Furfine

X.BUS-429 Building Effective Organizations

X.BUS-429CU Building Effective Organizations: 'Inclusion and Cultural Competency'

Credits: 2

Research indicates that organizations with greater diversity and inclusion outperform their peer organizations in terms of financial performance, innovation, and the ability to develop talent. In order to build an inclusive organization, it is critical that leaders are able to understand how to effectively engage and support culture and diversity in their organizations. In this course students will learn to define, assess and enhance cultural competence in their own work, their organizations and in community efforts. Student will examine case studies, learn to conduct a strategic audit, and build a cultural competency toolkit that will focus on relevant foundational and strategic issues.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Rich

X.BUS-431 Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This project-based course is designed for learning startup entrepreneurship methods from the idea stage to start-up, for commercial or social impact ventures (not-for-profit or for-profit). Students will learn about topics such as lean startup methods, market planning, development, finances, organization configurations, collaboration building, a customer and stakeholder and team- building and leadership to be able to apply them to practice in their own venture. Further study will include entrepreneurship, women in business, social impact, economic impact, and opportunity analysis.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
R. Feldman

X.CHEM-101 General Chemistry I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Introduces and develops fundamental concepts in chemical science, including stoichiometry, reactions in aqueous solutions,atomic structure, and chemical bonding. The laboratory emphasizes basic skills and quantitative chemical measurements.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
H. Jayathilake
Coreq: X.CHEM-101L.
Advisory: basic arithmetic, algebra, calculator use

X.CHEM-201 General Chemistry II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics include thermochemistry and thermodynamics; quantitative treatment of chemical equilibrium with applications to acid-base, solubility, and electron-transfer reactions; and chemical kinetics. Laboratory emphasizes analytical skills and experimental assessment of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
H. Jayathilake
Prereq: CHEM-101 with grade of C or better. Coreq: X.CHEM-201L.

X.CHEM-202 Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 4

Introduces organic chemistry, emphasizing the principles governing broad classes of reactions. Topics include stereochemistry, nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions, the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and ethers, and an introduction to infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Laboratory work includes synthesis, practice in the techniques of distillation, crystallization, chromatography, molecular modeling, and identifying unknown organic compounds by chemical and spectroscopic means.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
G. Snyder
Prereq: CHEM-201 with grade of C or better. Coreq: X.CHEM-202L.

X.CHEM-302 Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 4

A continuation of Chemistry 202 that addresses the chemistry of aromatic compounds, the carbonyl group, and a number of other functional groups. Examples drawn from compounds of biological interest. The laboratory includes organic synthesis and the identification of unknown compounds by chemical and spectroscopic means.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
D. Hamilton
Prereq: CHEM-202 with grade of C or better. Coreq: X.CHEM-302L.

X.CMPTC-101 'Computer Science 101': Problem Solving and Object-Oriented Programming

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Computers are used every day for an enormous variety of tasks, from playing games and chatting with friends to transferring billions of dollars, delivering radiation treatments, and controlling the electrical grid. Computer programs are an essential ingredient in allowing for this grade diversity of applications. In this course, you will learn to create your own programs based on core programming concepts and analytical problem solving approoaches. You will develop dynamic programs first using Adobe Flash CS4 and AS3 (ActionScript 3), the technology behind many Web applications. The last portion of the course will teach you Java, a very popular modern programming language. We assume no prior study of computer science. Programming intensive.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
A. DeFlumere
Coreq: X.CMPTC-101L.

X.CMPTC-109 iDesign Studio

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Designers are continually innovating ways of incorporating technology into today's world, from projections of performance dresses to "smart" purses that sense a missing wallet. The recent emergence of low-cost, user-friendly components is making this new world of design accessible to a broad community. In this course, students will think critically about products already in the marketplace and will be given the tools to create their own designs. A sequence of hands-on workshops on electronics basics and microcontroller programming will provide the surprisingly minimal level of comfort and background in technology required to produce prototypes of these designs.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
A. St. John

X.CMPTC-162 Introduction to Robotics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

From warfare to surgery to transportation, robots are permeating every aspect of modern life. In this course, students will explore the history and current state of robotics while designing, programming and building a robot of their own. Readings will trace the history of robotics from Rossum's Universal Robots to Predator Drones. Using the Arduino open-source microcontroller, students will develop techniques for handling analog sensor input and interacting with an uncertain environment. Ideal for computer science students interested in electronics, historians of technology, and artists who want to add interactive components to their work. This course will require a significant investment of time outside of class, but no prior experience with electronics or programming is required.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement

X.CMPTC-209 Interactive Design

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

Would you like to see your environment come to life? This course will focus on the basics of generating meaningful interactions between humans and machines. We will cover the design and construction of robots that can sense and react to their environment, and we will develop programs that detect faces and react to people in real time. This course is ideal for art students who want their works to move and interact, theater students who want to create an interactive space for performance, or anyone who wants to make their world a little richer with machine intelligence.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Baker
Advisory: Experience with coding will be valuable.

X.COMM-405 Speaking with Confidence: Leadership for Women

Credits: 1

This course helps women professionals develop effective oral communication skills necessary for delivering keynote speeches, panel presentations, conference talks and other public speaking situations. Drawing on a variety of theatre techniques used by experienced actors to relax, focus their message, and connect with an audience, this course will coach students in the art of confident and powerful communication. Students will be guided to uncover their unique strengths, develop an authentic and personalized speaking style, and overcome obstacles to delivering their message. Working closely together in a safe and supportive environment, students will complete the course with the presentation of an inspiring speech.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
S. Daniels
Advisory: Geared toward women professionals.

X.COMM-413 Building Bridges: Facilitating Courageous Conversations

Credits: 2

Building the capacity of groups to dialogue, create, and collaborate is an essential skill in professional settings across our region, nationally, and globally. This course offers a critical introduction to the principles and the role of intergroup dialogue and facilitation in creating transformative spaces for groups to explore differences and commonalities, increase awareness as individuals and as members of various social groups, build authentic relationships and identify actions that foster perspective taking and empathy. Through intergroup dialogue, role-play exercises, and assigned readings, participants will actively learn to engage in courageous conversations and facilitate groups across social divides to work together more effectively, collaboratively and compassionately.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement

X.ENGL-211 Shakespeare and Race

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Through characters such as Othello, Shylock, and Aaron the Moor, this course will explore how Shakespeare staged, to borrow Hamlet's phrase, the "theater of others". We will focus upon how Shakespeare's plays represent race and racial relationships in the early modern context. How do his plays both reinforce and critique socially and culturally constructed assumptions about race? How do they both draw upon and subvert or challenge dramatic conventions of race and why? What can we learn about race and attitudes towards race, in Shakespeare's time and our own, from the questions raised by his plays and their histories of theatrical interpretation and critical response?

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Pangallo
Advisory: Introductory literature course, particularly a Shakespeare course.

X.ENGL-227 Jane Austen in Adaptation

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Jane Austen's work stands almost as its own subgenre in the evolution of the novel. Happening at a moment of transitions, her work can be read formally as a bridge between the experiments of eighteenth century realism and what was just to come in the Victorian novel. Although she is often admired for her humor and satire around marriage and sex, the novels also engage with aesthetics, epistemology, and sensibility: political ideas about what constitutes beauty, what it means to know something, and how much one should feel. We will read the completed novels, some of her influences and contemporaries, and critical and theoretical contexts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
J. Pyke

X.ENVST-142 Ecology Through Animal Tracking of Visual Literacy

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

This course will provide students with a field-based understanding of animal ecology, through the lens of animal tracking. The bulk of our time will be spent in the field visiting local habitats. In each habitat, we will discuss the interactions among animal, plant, and abiotic components occurring there. Students will be expected to make progress on their ability to identify and interpret animal tracks and sign. This course will entail considerable winter hiking. Students will need to bring lunch, warm clothes and boots and should be prepared for long days in cold, wet, and strenuous conditions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Mercier

X.HUM-116 A Hands-On History of the Book

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 1

Every book tells a story - not just the story in the pages, but the story of those pages. How has the book's physical nature changed over time and what are the connections between its material form, meaning, and value within specific historical contexts? What forces have shaped the book's physical nature, and why have these had the effects that they have had? This course will introduce students to the new interdisciplinary field known as "the history of the book". Our course will involve hands-on work with old, rare, and intriguing books and manuscripts.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Pangallo
Notes: Field trip 1/11 from 9am - 12pm

X.LANG-101CH Intensive Elementary Chinese I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This intensive course emphasizes development of oral proficiency as well as gradual acquisition of reading and writing skills. Students will achieve: ability to distinguish, to pronounce, and to write accurately all the individual syllables in the phonetic romanization system (Hanyu pinyin) of modern standard (Mandarin) Chinese; ability to communicate effectively with the basic sentence patterns and vocabulary words introduced in the course; ability to converse on simple topics with considerable accuracy and fluency; ability to recognize/write approximately 350 characters and to read passages in the simplified character form; ability to write sentences and short paragraphs.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Y. Liu, Z. Wang

X.LANG-101JP Intensive Elementary Japanese I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course is designed for students who have never previously studied Japanese. The course will introduce the overall structure of Japanese, basic vocabulary, the two syllabaries of the phonetic system, and some characters (Kanji). The course will also introduce the notion of "cultural appropriateness for expressions," and will provide practice and evaluations for all four necessary skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
W. Tawa

X.LANG-102JP Intensive Elementary Japanese II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course follows Elementary Japanese I. The course will continue to introduce the notion of "cultural appropriateness for expressions," and will provide practice and evaluations for all four necessary skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
W. Tawa
Prereq: Intensive Elementary Japanese I or equivalent.

X.MEDIA-411 Visual Literacy and Media

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

Most of us are constantly inundated by visual messages, but do we know or understand the design, intent and the impact of these communications? This intensive, interdisciplinary course provides theories and tools to critically analyze, interpret and read/understand visual messages presented through a variety of forms of media, such as film, photography, video, digital games, and the internet. Students will develop critical and cultural visual literacy analysis skills mainly through the language of cinematic conventions such as composition, lighting, movement, editing and symbolism in Chinese film and apply them to other cultural contexts and their own lives. They will also examine the role and influence of media and how social dimensions such as gender, race, class and ethnicity are portrayed.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Y. Ma

X.MEDIA-429 Media Production Topics

These courses offer conceptual knowledge and basic design principles as well as hands-on instruction to use digital media tools such as video, audio, podcasting, websites and other emerging technologies. Each topics course will be unique in its application of one or more media platforms, but they will all be designed for the production of dynamic, high quality and compelling content that is ready for dissemination.

X.MEDIA-429VP Media Production Topics: 'Video Production'

Credits: 2

This is a hands-on foundational class exploring every step of video production for educators, artists and other professionals in the community who want to create engaging, eye-catching videos. We will cover all of the components of production, including aesthetics and mechanics, narrative development, the role of audio, and the conceptual and technical aspects of editing. You are invited to come with a story to tell or a product, service or brand to promote. Plan to dedicate a significant amount of time outside of class sessions to readings, viewings, and practical assignments to expand your perspective of the power of communication through video. Students will complete a series of in-class exercise pieces, and each will make a short video as a final project.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
M. Polish
Notes: Please come to class with your own external hard drive with a minimum capacity of 500GB, and also bring any equipment with video capabilities that you would like to use, including cell phones, tablets, DSLR cameras, camcorders, etc. A limited number of cameras may also be available to share.

X.PHYS-101 Physics I

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This algebra-based introduction to physics covers kinematics, force, Newton's laws, equilibrium, momentum, energy, conservation laws, gravitation, rotation, and oscillations. Jointly with the Physics 2 course, it will provide a good preparation for the physics components of the MCAT.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
The department
Coreq: X.PHYS-101L.
Advisory: Math competency up through but not necessarily including calculus

X.PHYS-151 Physics II

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This is the second half of the algebra-based introductory physics sequence. Topics, drawn largely from the MCAT syllabus, include fluids and elasticity, thermodynamics, sound and light waves, electricity and magnetism, and atomic structure.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
H. Hatch
Coreq: X.PHYS-151L.
Advisory: Math competency up through but not necessarily including calculus

X.PSYCH-100 Introduction to Psychology

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to Psychology. How do we make decisions, form attachments, and learn a language? Can we inherit schizophrenia? Why are we fearful of some situations and not others? What factors influence the way we form attitudes or develop prejudices? This course addresses such questions to provide an overview of current research in psychology.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Gilbert Cote

X.PSYCH-210 Social Psychology

Credits: 4

This course surveys a range of topics within social psychology. How do other people influence us? How do people perceive one another? How do attitudes develop and change? Under what conditions do people conform to, or deviate from, social norms? We will survey concepts across several areas of social psychology with an emphasis on empirical research evidence.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Gilbert Cote

X.PSYCH-230 Human Development Throughout the Lifespan

Credits: 4

This course surveys human development from conception and infancy, through childhood and adolescence, and into late adulthood. Through consideration of major theories and current research, we will discuss the core issues of human development within the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive domains. Through guided discussion, readings, and activities, we will journey through the rapid physical and cognitive development of infancy; explore adolescence and the search for identity; examine moral reasoning in young adulthood; appraise the classic theoretical approaches to midlife changes; and attempt to define "successful aging" in late adulthood. These topics, among many others, will be addressed through a lifespan perspective as we endeavor toward understanding the remarkable human developmental experience.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Lee
Notes: The course is designed to fulfill requirements for those pursuing credit within the social sciences, education, and health fields (however, students should check with their department to ensure course approval). Students of any field or level are welcome.

X.PSYCH-236 Adolescent and Adult Development

Credits: 4

When we think of human development, we often think of the period between infancy and late childhood. However, contemporary research contends that we continue to develop in crucial ways across the "other" 3/4 of our lifespan. This course surveys human development from adolescence to late adulthood through consideration of major theories and current research relating to social, emotional, and cognitive domains. We will journey through adolescence and explore the search for identity, examine moral reasoning in young adulthood, appraise the classic theoretical approaches to midlife changes, define "successful aging" in late adulthood, and identify issues that surround death and bereavement.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
C. Lee

X.SOCAN-253 Sociology of 9/11

Credits: 4

You will explore the cultural and political impact of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. The media's role in constructing meanings will be a main organizing focus of the course. Using readings, discussions, assignments, and films, the course will allow you to form a picture of how 9/11 changed America and beyond.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
N. Michaud Wild
Prereq: SOCI-123.

X.WRTNG-106 Blank Slate and Blank Page: Generative Writing

X.WRTNG-106JA Blank Slate and Blank Page: Generative Writing

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 2

In this course we will learn to see the opportunity in the blank page & in the outlines of the sculpture that lies within the blank slate. We will learn strategies to give ourselves the structure we need to get started. We'll work with daily prompts for writing in various creative genres, using the visual, the somatic, and the written to get us started. We'll create prompts for one another & reflect on what is most effective to get us started & keep us moving. At the end of the course, you will have a collection of prompts you can use moving forward, as well as a whole collection of rough draft work to revise on your own time.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Fridman
Advisory: A minimum of one course in freshman composition, an equivalent, or proof of waiver of such a course would be ideal in order to make sure students have English reading and writing fluency.
Notes: Please note that this is a two-credit, writing-intensive course. We will do quite a bit of work in just over two weeks, so be prepared to commit to reading and writing. It is imperative that you stay on track with assignments, which will build on each other. If you fall behind with reading or assignments, you will have difficulty completing the course.

X.WRTNG-106SM Blank Slate and Blank Page: Generative Writing

Credits: 4

Do you struggle to get started on papers or creative projects? Do you love writing and want to express yourself, but feel intimidated by the blank page? In this course we will learn to see the opportunity in the blank page and in the outlines of the sculpture that lies within the blank slate. We will learn strategies to give ourselves the structure we need to get started. We'll work with daily prompts for writing in various creative genres, finding our feet via different themes each week, from ekphrastic prompts to collaboration, corporeal writing to imitation. We'll create prompts for one another and reflect on what is most effective to get us started and keep us moving. At the end of the course, you will have a collection of prompts you can use moving forward, as well as whole collection of rough draft work to revise on your own time. In the last week of our course we'll have the opportunity to learn workshopping technique and begin revising new work and providing useful, thoughtful feedback to our peers.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Fridman
Advisory: This course is appropriate for those with lots of experience in writing and for those with very little experience -- the purpose of the course is to generate your own momentum in ways that will be useful for to our in both creative and academic writing. English reading and writing fluency (a first-year course in composition or equivalent).
Notes: Please note that this is a four-credit writing-intensive course. We will do quite a bit of work in just over six weeks, so be prepared to commit to reading and writing. It is imperative that you stay on track with assignments, which will build on each other. If you fall behind with reading or assignments, you will have difficulty completing the course.

X.WRTNG-201 Introduction to Creative Writing

Credits: 4

We will learn to use words as creative medium by exploring examples of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, by writing, by experimenting with our own writing, an by responding to one another's work. At the end of the course, you will have a revised manuscript in a genre you choose, experience writing in multiple genres, a vocabulary for the craft of writing, a literary community, a notebook of ideas to keep you going, and the ability to give and receive constructive feedback. It is imperative that you stay on track with assignments, which will build on each other. If you fall behind with reading or assignments, you will have difficulty completing the course.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Fridman

X.WRTNG-406 Creative Inquiry and Writing a Research

Credits: 2

This course will immerse students in writing as informal research practice. Taking as our starting point contemporary American writing addressing the labor conditions of late capitalism, we will examine strategies for creative inquiry used to document and research topics not normally or officially investigated. Due to the length of this course, we'll focus particularly on short forms and generating new writing, as opposed to revision and critique. Topics to be discussed will include research as community building, fragment as form, and the collapsing of high vs low culture in contemporary American experimental writing. Students will write into a variety of forms modeled by readings from Jill Magi, Bhanu Kapil, Dodie Bellamy, Brandon Brown and Stephanie Young, among others.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
L. Fridman
Advisory: English (reading and writing) fluency is required. Previous experience with creative writing is advised, but not required.
Notes: Requirements of the coure will include daily class participation including reflective and critical posts, as well as a final portfolio of original writing.